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Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy; Wheltons of County Cork and Galveston, Texas

My wife's father, Patrick Whelton, was born on August 18, 1901, in Desert (Catholic parish and Poor Law Union of Clonakilty), county Cork, Ireland. His parents were Matthew (Tadhg) Whelton and Ellen Donovan.

The civil parish of Desert includes most of the Catholic parishes of Clonakilty and Darrara, in the Diocese of Cork and Ross. See: County Cork Roman Catholic Records, Cork—Civil and Catholic Parishes, and Cork Civil Parish - Catholic Parish cross reference list. There were no Wheltons listed in Desert in Griffith's Valuation of 1848–1864, but there were 5 Welton families there, including William Welton who was probably my wife's great-great grandfather. There were two Whelton families in the parish of Templeomalus, which adjoined Desert to its immediate east, 6 Whelton families in the nearby parish of Abbeymahon, and several more in other nearby parishes. Abbeymahon is #1 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, immediately south of the parish of Timoleague, and immediately northwest of Lislee; Templeomalus parish is #63 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, one parish removed to the east of Abbeymahon, and to the southeast of Timoleague. See my section below on Griffith's Valuation—County Cork.

My wife's father, Patrick Whelton, was issued a British passport, with the endorsement "Travelling to United States of America," by the "Branch Passport Office, Liverpool" on February 9, 1921, and it was endorsed by the American Consulate at Cork (Queenstown) Ireland on February 15, 1921. Notations on the passport say "New York - March 4, 1921" and "Galveston - April 6, 1921." The Ellis Island website shows that Patrick Whelton arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the Cedric on February 24, 1921. He was a single male, a "Farm Labourer," age 19, who could read and write, British nationality, Irish race, from Clonakilty, county Cork, Ireland. In the box for "The name and complete address of nearest relative or friend in country whence alien came" was: "Mother, Mrs. Whelton, Dessert, Clonakilty, Co. Cork." His final destination was listed as Flushing - L. I. - New York. His mother's maiden name (not shown on the passport) was Ellen Donovan.

My wife's mother, Anne Kilroy, was issued a passport by the Irish Free State, Passport Branch of the Department of External Affairs, in Dublin, on February 12, 1927. Quota Immigration Visa No. 24507 was issued to her by the American Consul in Dublin on April 11, 1927.

My wife's parents, Patrick Whelton and Anne Kilroy, met on the boat that brought Anne (Nancy) Kilroy to the United States for the first time in 1927. Patrick Whelton was returning from a visit to Ireland. Nancy went to a home of a relative, probably of her brother and sister-in-law, Peter Kilroy and Catherine (Kate) Hoban Kilroy, in Cleveland. Patrick returned to his job as a fireman in Galveston. They continued their friendship by correspondence, and they were married in St. Cecilia Catholic Church in Cleveland, Ohio, on June 26, 1929. Witnesses were Domenic Kilroy and Matilda Kilroy. A record of the marriage of Nancy Kilroy and Patrick Whelton will be found at volume 157, page 171, page match 29, of the records of the Probate Court of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, which are on the Internet under Historical Marriage License Index, 1810 - April 1998. Application 245352 was filed and a marriage license was issued in Cuyahoga county, Ohio, on June 20, 1929. The groom was listed as Patrick Whelton, age 27, with an address of 3549 E. 157th Street, born in Ireland, to Mathew Whelton and Ellen Donovan, whose occupation was "fireman." The bride is listed as Nancy Kilroy, age 29, with an address of 2943 East Overlook, born in Ireland, to Edward Kilroy and Bridget Kilroy, with no occupation listed. The Reverend E. A. Kirby (of Kinsman Road) returned the document with a certification that he had performed the marriage on June 26, 1929. Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810–1973 on Ancestry.com.

The newly married Wheltons returned to Galveston, Texas, where they are listed in the 1930 census of Galveston on 25th street (roll 2334, page 2B).

Some history of the Kilroy family in county Mayo and the United States will be found on my page: The Kilroy Connection.

 

 Table of Contents 

Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy in Galveston

The 1930 census of Galveston, Texas, lists Patrick and Annie Whelton, my wife's parents, living in a rented house at 1119 25th Street:

Patrick Whelton (head), age 28, married at age 27, born in Ireland to parents born in Ireland, emigrated in 1921, naturalized, fireman (railroad) (roll 2334, page 3B).

Annie Whelton (wife), age 30, married at age 29, born in Ireland to parents born in Ireland, emigrated in 1927 (papers pending).

The 1940 census of Galveston lists this family at a home worth $3500 that they owned at 5301 Avenue R (Enumeration district 84–35, block 455, sheet 16-A, lines 6–11; page 31 or 48):

(1940) Patrick Whelton (head), age 38, married, born in the Irish Free State, naturalized, lived in the same house on April 1, 1935, 60 hours worked during the week of March 24–30, 1940, fireman, city fire department, earned $1400 in wages in 1939.

Nancy Whelton (wife), age 40, married, born in the Irish Free State, naturalized, engaged in housework at home.

Edward F. Whelton (son), age 9, born in Texas, attending school, completed 3rd grade.

Ellen M. Wheton (daughter), age 8, born in Texas, attending school, completed 1st grade..

Maurice P. Whelton (son), age 6, born in Texas, attending school, had not com;pleted a grade..

Mathilda A. Whelton (my wife Teel), age 3, born in Texas, had not attended school.

Patrick and Nancy Whelton had six children:

Edward Francis Whelton, born in Galveston on August 8, 1930, died in Galveston on June 25, 1984; never married.

Ellen Mary Whelton, born in Galveston on February 2, 1932, died in Galveston on April 8, 1985; never married. [See Galveston County Births 1932]

Maurice Patrick Whelton, born in Galveston, on July 14, 1934. Married Elaine Brown on February 16, 1957, in Albany, New York. [See Galveston Co. TX - Births, 1934] Their children are:

Michael, born Oct. 14, 1959
Dennis, born July 3, 1960, died July 6, 1960
Gregory, born Sept. 5, l961
Denise, Born August. 27, l963
Diane, born August 27, l963
Bridget born June 3, l965

Matilda Ann (Teel) Whelton, born in Galveston on July 1, 1936; married Hugh McGough on October 6, 1956, in Galveston, Texas. [See Galveston Co. TX - Births, 1936] Their children, all of whom were born in Seattle, are:

Nancy McGough, born July 1, 1957
Thomas McGough, born April 15, 1960
Mary McGough, born December 8, 1964

Rose Marie Whelton, born in Galveston on August 29, 1941, died in Galveston on December 2, 1942. [See Galveston County, Texas - Births 1941]

Patrick Joseph Whelton, born in Galveston, on January 30, 1944. [See Galveston Co. TX - Births, 1944]. He married Sharron Rose Brown in Galveston in 1966. They have two sons, Jeff (christened Jeffery Joseph) and Paul (christened Joseph Paul). Jeffery Joseph Whelton was born in Galveston on November 21, 1966. Jeff has started a Whelton Genealogy and History website, which at this point is graced mostly with pictures of his wife, Stephanie, and children Kathryn and Thomas Joseph (born November 23, 2001, 9 lbs. 4 oz., and 21 inches long!). Jeff's brother, Joseph Paul Whelton was born in Galveston on July 29, 1970.

Patrick Whelton, the father of these children (and my father-in-law), died in Galveston on June 3, 1959. Here is an obituary from the Galveston Daily News of Thursday, June 4, 1959 (page 25):

Patrick Whelton
Dies in Infirmary

Patrick Whelton, 57, died in St. Mary’s Infirmary at 4:09 p. m. Wednesday.

A resident of Galveston since 1921, he was a member of the local fire
department 27 years and was born August 18, 1901, in County Cork,
Ireland.

He was a member of the Knights of Columbus 30 years and was also a
member of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church.

Survivors include his wife Nancy of Galveston; two daughters, Miss
Ellen Whelton of Dallas and Mrs. Teel McGough of Seattle, Wash.; three
sons Edward, Maurice P., both of Houston and Patrick of Galveston; a
sister, Mrs. Joe East of Galveston; three brothers, Stephen of New
York City, Matthew of the U. S. Air Force in London, England, and John
of County Cork, Ireland; a grandchild, nieces and two nephews.

Funeral arrangements will be announced by Malloy & Son funeral home.

The mother, Anne (Nancy) Kilroy Whelton, died in Galveston on October 25, 1986. [See Vital Records - Galveston County, Tx - Deaths 1986] They are buried with two of their children, Edward and Ellen, in Calvary Cemetery, in Galveston. For a listing of several of the Whelton deaths in Galveston, go to Texas Death Records from 1964 thru 1998.

A sister and two brothers of my wife's father, Patrick Whelton, are buried in Calvary Cemetery, Galveston: Hannah W. (Whelton) East (October 18, 1903–August 26, 1982) and her husband Joe East (June 4, 1892–October 18, 1979); Michael Stephen Whelton (January 15, 1905–November 29, 1990); and Matthew Whelton (July 4, 1906–November 29, 1978). M. Stephen Whelton is listed as Michael S. Whelton in the Social Security Death Index. Neither Stephen nor Matthew married. They both had resided briefly in Galveston after their retirement. They died in Jersey City, Hudson county, New Jersey, where they resided together. Both were buried in the family plot in Galveston. A younger brother, John Whelton, stayed in Ireland.

Maps of the town Clonakilty and Timoleague, County Cork.

The West Cork, Ireland, web page, lists Whelton (and Houlihan) among "well known family surnames with roots in West Cork." The Wheltons came from the area of west Cork centered around the towns of Clonakilty and Timoleague. An understanding of the geography of the area is helpful in understanding the references to places in Ireland from which the Wheltons came. The bay immediately west of Kinsale Bay on the Atlantic coast of county Cork is Courtmacsherry Bay, with the town of Timoleague at the head of the bay. The next bay to the west is Clonakilty.

Here is a Detailed Map of the Clonakilty Area (long download). with the town of Timoleague in the upper right hand corner of the map. Here is a list of Clonakilty townlands, including Desert and Darrara. (Both these items are on the excellent website of John Hayes, Fáilte Romhat.) On the map, Desert appears about 1 kilometer east of the town of Clonakilty, just across the head of Clonakilty Harbour. The town of Darrara, where my wife's grandfather is buried, is 2 kilometers east by northeast by Desert. The name of the town is misspelled on the map as Darrary. Lisnagun Fort (as spelled on the map), where an ancient ring fort has been reconstructed, is to the immediate east, and the burial ground is to the immediate south. See Lios-na-gCon. Here is an excerpt from Clonakilty—West Cork Ireland:

"Lisnagun Fort & Souterrain Passages

"Only one mile from Clonakilty town is the restored site of an ancient fort, Lis na-gCon, which means 'Fort of the Hound'. On this site there is a replica of the type of thatched mud dwelling typical of the period, inside a fortified ring. The souterrain passage has been dug out, and it is possible to go underground where people have been sheltered with their valuables in the event of an attack by hostile tribes."

Lios-na-gCon (Ring Fort of the Hound), Darrara Agricultural College, Clonakilty, is the only Ring Fort in Ireland reconstructed on its original site. The site of Lios- na-gCon is on the property of Teagasc Clonakilty Agricultural College.

Here is a 1675 map of the Bandon area that shows Clonekelty and Timolegue.

The following information is from: County Cork—part of an Irish genealogy website 'From Ireland' ©Dr. Jane Lyons, Dublin, Ireland. (See also: County of Cork and County Cork Physical and Statistical Info.)

"The Bays and Harbours are Youghal Harbour separating the counties of Cork and Waterford, where the Blackwater enters the sea; Ballycotton Bay; Cork Harbour, at the mouth of the lee; Kinsale Harbour at the mouth of the Bandon, and Courtmacsherry at the mouth of the Arigideen; next are the Bays of Clonakilty and Rosscarbery, ...

"The Bandon rises at Owen Hill west of Dunmanway, and flowing by Dunmanway, Bandon and Inishannon enters Kinsale harbour. Its tributaries are the Caha, another Blackwater and the Brinny ...

"Other rivers in the county [include] the Adrigeen which enters Courtmacsharry Bay ...[at Timoleague]"

For a sketch map and beautiful photographs, go to: West Cork & Kerry, Ireland, presented by Dave Parker.

A simplified map showing the towns of Clonakilty, Kinsale, and Timoleague, among others, will be found on the website of Lettercollum House in Timoleague. See also A Guide to West Cork. A detailed map of county Cork (a long download), showing Clonakilty and Clonakilty Bay, is available on Ginni Swanton's Web Site. (Desert is shown immediately east of the town of Clonakilty, on the east edge of the top of Clonakilty Harbour.) Clonakilty Bay is the second bay west of Kinsale Harbour. The same website publishes a detailed map of Clonakilty. See also the location map on Seven Heads View: "Result of the search in Seven Heads View—Ireland-Butlerstown." The map can be enlarged, and shows the location of Butlerstown, Barrys Point, Seven Heads, and Dunworthy Bay, in relation to Timoleague, Courtmacsherry, and Clonakilty.

For a map showing the location of the civil parish of Desert (West), go to County (Corcaigh. From corcach, meaning "marsh"), click on "Cork civil parishes" in the left column, then click on the map of southwest Cork at the lower left. Desert is parish number 17 on the table showing the civil parishes of West Cork. Click on Desert and the names of the townlands in the parish will be displayed. All townlands listed in the parish of Desert are in the Poor Law Union of Clonakilty.

Clonakilty is displayed as a Catholic parish on a map on South-West Cork Roman Catholic records, about twenty English miles west by southwest of Kinsale, and about half way between Kinsale and Skibbereen. The Catholic parish of Clonakilty includes most of the civil parishes of Desert and Kilgarriff. The townland of Clonakilty is actually in the civil parish of Kilgarriff, which is the civil parish immediately west of the civil parish of Desert. See the IreAtlas Townland Data Base. The Catholic parish of Timoleague is immediately east of the Catholic parish of Clonakilty. See About Timoleague, West Cork. For some good phonographs of the village of Timoleague, see: Southwest Ireland - Timoleague (Tigh Molaige).

Walter's Irish Surnames Database for county Kerry includes some names from western county Cork, and lists:

"Whelton, Desert, Clonakilty, Co. Cork"

"Donovan, (O)Donovan, [MacL: IRL O Donnabhain. Origin Co. Limerick, a leading Sept in SW Cork, a br. To Co. Kilkenny.], Tralee."

Timoleague—Courtmacsherry Bay

"Timoleague lies about eleven miles south of Bandon. It was formerly spelt Tagumlag, Tymulagy, Tymoleague, &c., and it derives its name from the Tee Molaga (the house of Molaga),* and Irish saint, who lived in A.D. 665, and to whom the abbey, built in the beginning of the fourteenth century, was dedicated. The town of Timoleague, and much of the adjacent country, anciently belonged to the Hodnetts—an English family who settled here from Shopshire; and prior to their advent it belonged to the O'Cowigs."

From History of Bandon, chapter XVIII.

"Courtmacsherry is upwards of two miles to the south-east of Timoleague. It is a very pretty marine village, and is most agreeably situated on the southern-side of Courtmacsherry Bay. It consists of one long street, whose windings in and out, with the graceful curvature of the water upon whose shores it is built, renders its aspect varying and attractive. The portion of it principally occupied by visitors contains many good-sized, comfortable, and cleanly dwellings; and they are built at the foot of a well-wooded hill, which almost surrounds the village on three sides-screening it from the scathing east wind, as well as from winds from the south and west.... "

"In the reign of James the First, Courtmasherry was spelt Courtneshry, and, up to a few years since, Court-mac-Sherry (that is the court of Mac Sherry, according to Smith, who states that it was built by a Shropshire man named Hodnett, and that he, wishing to drop his English patronymic and become wholly Irish, assumed the name of Mac Sherry).

" Others state that it was an Englishman named Foley, whose Irish name was MacSearuig, who gave this place his name. Another derivation is "Cluan na uishga geel" (the harbour of the white waters); and another is "Cuirt na muishire" (the court of the oysters)-in reference to the great oyster bed that was here formerly."

From History of Bandon (1869), chapter XVIII (1869).

Here is a brief history of Timoleague Abbey, founded in 1240 by one of the MacCarthys for the Franciscans in 124—on the site already associated with St. Molaga, hence the name Timoleague, i.e. Tigh Molaga or the House of Molaga..

See: Courtmacsherry, County Cork, in Lewis Topographical Dictionary by Samuel Lewis.

Cornelius Whelton was a builder with wooded property overlooking Courtmacsherry Bay in what was described as an "unspoilt, scenic area." Whelton had applied for a permit to retain a private lock-up container on his property, and an inspector's report of October 30, 2007, recommended denial of the application. The report gives us a good description of the area:

"Courtmacsherry is an attractive seaside village, which is located at the end of a wooded peninsula about 15km east of Clonakilty. The village is accessed by means of the R600 from Clonakilty (and the R602 from Bandon) and the R601 from Timoleague, which terminates at Courtmacsherry Bay. The village stretches along the southern side of the bay in a mainly linear fashion. The gradient of the land rises steeply to the south away from the village, and there is a linear stretch of woodland along the hillside above the village." The appeal site is located within this woodland above the eastern end of the village." (from "An appeal by Cornelius Whelton.")

Butlerstown is about 2 miles south by southwest ,of the village of Courtmacsherry and can be found on MapQuest. Ballymacshoneen, which is often named as an ancestral home of Whelton families, is within walking distance to the east of Butlerstown. See: A West Cork Scrapbook, which describes this walk near Courtmacsherry:

"Books of walks around Courtmacsherry and district may be bought from many local shops and pubs. We drove to Narry's Cross Roads, parked the car and walked through Ballylangy to the almost deserted village of Shanagh, along the unpaved famine road down to the coast then on to Ballymacshoneen, Carrigeen and Butlerstown. There we rested for a while at O'Neills, a friendly pub in the middle of the brightly-painted row of houses. A ten-minute walk took us back to our car. The entire walk took under 4 hours including stops to admire the view and for refreshment."

Whelton's Food Market is opposite the Barryroe parish Catholic church (civil parishes of Lislee, Abbeymahon, Donaghmore, Kilsillagh) at Barryroe, near Butlerstown. Here is a description of the location of Butlerstown House and a map. MapQuest will show the location of Lislevane about 1 mile southwest of Barryroe, approximately half way between Ardgehane and Butlerstown, although if the location of Lislevane itself is requested, it will be marked on their map only by a star. The Church of Our Lady, Star of the Sea, was founded in Lislevane in 1869; and the website says, that for certified records, "For indexed years write to Dan Whelton, Currimevern, Lislevane, Bandon, Co Cork." For more on local geography, see: County Cork—Lislee House Country Estate.

Seven Heads Peninsula

"Between Timoleague, around thirteen miles west of Kinsale, and Clonakilty, six miles further on, lies the Seven Heads Peninsula, a delightful area with a pretty indented shoreline and, in summer, a wonderfully balmy atmosphere. While the peninsula has none of the drama of landscapes further west, it does have a quiet, understated charm that can be quite disarming after the hectic tourism of Kinsale. It's a fine place too for birdwatching and leisurely cycling. Both the town of Clonakilty and the village of Timoleague make good bases from which to explore this part of the county; the little coastal village of Courtmacsherry offers a quieter option still."

Patrick Whelton of Barreragh is listed as a Landholder in Lislee parish (electoral division Courtmacsherry) in Guy's Postal Directory., 1914, Courtmacsherry.

Colette Whelton of Ballymacshoneen, Butlerstown, county Cork, filed a planning application with the Cork County Council on December 22, 2004, to construct a dormer bungalow and garage at Killaneetig Ballinadee. (#04/9586).

Selina Whelton and Tim Sheehy of Kilnahone, Ballygarvan, county Cork filed a planning application with the Cork County Council on February 11, 2005, to construct a dwelling house at Kilnahone, Ballygarvan. (#04/7614)

On April 26, 1978, the Minister for Agriculture the estates in South-West Cork listed land held by the Land Commission; the acreage of each; the date on which each was acquired; and the expected date for their division. One of the listings was:

Whelton, 6 acres at Butlerstown, 5 miles S. of Timoleague, acquired on December 20, 1973 (record number U.C.2118). (Dáil Éireann - Volume 305 - 26 April, 1978)

Ms. Maura Whelton is listed as the contact for the Barryroe & Courtmacsherry Community Alert.

The death of Kitty O'Connor (Whelton) of Bandon, Cork Ireland, was announced in the Irish Examiner of December 1, 2000.

The website of the Sacred Heart Church, Darrara (1897) says that urgent calls to the sacristy and communications regarding flowers should be made should be made to Agnes Whelton.

Clonakilty

For a sketch of the town of Clonakilty and a brief history, see: Historical Walk of Clonakilty and its Sea Front.

"About twelve miles from Bandon lies the town of Clonakilty. It is situated in the parish of Kilgarriff, and in the eastern division of the barony of East Carberry. Up to nearly twenty-five years ago Clonakilty was spelt Cloughnakilty, and previous to that it was Cloughneekeelty (that is, according to some, the stone* of Kilty—a family of that name having occupied the site on which the town stands before any houses were erected there). Others derive it from the Cluan Callow (the harbour of the valley). Another derivation—and probably the correct one—is Cluan Keeltha (the harbour of the woods).+

"In all likelihood the town was founded by some of those who came over to the new colony on the banks of the Bandon towards the close of Elizabeth's reign, as the names of many of its first inhabitants are common to both settlements—one brother settling in one place, and another in the other.

"That they were English, and that they professed the same religious and political opinions as their fellow-colonists at Bandon-Bridge, may be looked upon as equally certain."

From History of Bandon (1869), chapter XVIII

The Roman Catholic Parish of Ardfield & Rathbarry lies in Clonakilty. (See History of Bandon, chapter XVIII—Clonakilty (page 346). The baptism register of that parish for 1801–1876 (LdS Film 4771) (the list is limited to baptisms involving a member of the Driscoll family) lists several Wheltons and Donovans, including a Maurice Whelton and Ellen Donovan, who resided in Muckross, who were the parents of James Whelton, who was baptized on May 28, 1835. Ellen Donovan was a sponsor of several of the baptisms involving a Driscoll. Civil Registration of Births - 1870 lists a Patrick Driscoll born to Patrick Driscoll and Catherine Whelton on February 14, 1870, in Timoleague.

Bandon

Although Wheltons did not generally live within the town of Bandon, the town plays a significant part in their history. See: History of Bandon (1869), by George Bennett.

"Bandon or Bandon-Bridge or Bandon Bridge:

"A borough, market, and post-town, partly in the parish of Kilbrogan, barony of Kinalmeaky, but chiefly in that of Ballymodan, partly in the barony of Kinalmeaky, and partly in the East Division of the barony of East Carbery, county of Cork, and province of Munster, 15½ miles south-west from Cork, and 141½ south-west by south from Dublin containing 9917 inhabitants. This place derives its name from the erection of a bridge over the river Bandon, and owes its origin to the English planters on the great Desmond forfeitures in the reign of Elizabeth."

Bandon, Ballymodan & Kilbroggan Descriptions, c.1835:

For a map of the Bandon/Cork area, see Bandon the Focus of Attack by West Cork Brigade (February 23, 1921) on the information-packed website: Cork's War of Independence, 1917–1921. There is a monument at Bandon honoring the Third West Cork Brigade members.

At the founding of Bandon in 1613, it was decreed "that no Papist inhabitant shall be suffered to dwell within the town." In The Journal of Charles Wesley, September 1– December 31, 1748, Wesley calls Bandon "a town of Protestants only." History of Bandon, Chapter III. "It was said throughout Ireland that even the pigs were Protestant in Bandon. It was also said that the main gate to the town had a sign which read: A Turk*, a Jew or an Atheist may enter this town but not a Papist." From the website: Hennigan—Ó h-Éanachain. The local response was supposedly: "Who wrote it, wrote it well; For the same is written on the Gates of Hell." The British - Irish Community of Cork by David Brewster

For more information on the area, see: Julia Mahoney Genealogy.

Whelton Family History

My wife's cousin, Margaret Ann Whelton (Mrs. Joseph Anthony Raitano) of Santa Fe, Texas, was kind enough to send me an extensive family history of her branch of the Whelton family, which traces the family back to Bartholomew Whelton, who was born in Desert, Clonakilty, Cork, in 1780. The history traces hundreds of his descendants. Only a small portion of the information is included in this website, and this family history would be an invaluable source of information for an researcher into the Whelton family. Most of the information in this family history was collected and compiled over a period of several years by John P. Whelton, Jr., of LaMarque, Texas. He began his prodigious work in about 1982. When I mention the Whelton "family history" on this page, I am referring to his work.

As of March 24, 2005, I have begun integrating information from this family history into this website. This results in duplication—that I will work to eliminate. Some of the unanswered questions and gaps in information should disappear as I complete my project of integration. Like all my web pages, this is a work in progress.

Many of the Whelton who moved to Galveston were accompanied by their cousins, the Hurleys. I have given extra emphasis in this web page, therefore, to connections with the Hurleys who moved from county Cork to Galveston.

Patrick Whelton's Father—Matthew Tadhg Whelton

My wife's father's father was Matthew (or Tadhg) Whelton. Tadhg (sometimes spelled Taidhg), is an ancient Irish name (perhaps a predecessor of Timothy). "Tadhg — (TAYG)(Gr) 'poet' or 'honors god'; form of Timothy. Tadc, Tiomoid, Teague, Taidgh, Tiege." Celtic Male Names of Ireland. See: Tadhg is a very old Irish name on T@dhg Sulliv@n's website, which says:

"Timothy, Tim and Ted and Thady are the most common equivalents to Tadhg. In the 19th century it was generally anglicised as Thady, (which is what my grand uncle from Kerry was called— hence my name). It was also translated as Thaddaeus, Theophilius and Theodsius, which are names of classical and biblical origin."

See also Index of Names in Irish Annals: Tadc / Tadhg by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien); and Kate Monk's Onomastikon—Irish Names of Celtic Origin.

Matthew (Tadhg) Whelton, my wife's grandfather, was one of seven children of Bartholomew Whelton and Johanna Hurley. The family history says Matthew was born in Ireland in 1867, died there on December 5, 1942, and is buried in Darrara Cemetery. (Other birth lists give his birth date as April 15, 1869.)]

Matthew married Ellen Donovan on April 15, 1899. They had five children, the oldest of whom was my wife's father:

Patrick (Little Patty) Whelton, born on August 18, 1901, in Desert, county Cork, and who died in Galveston, Texas, on June 3, 1959 (my wife's father)

Hannah Whelton, born on October 17 (or 18), 1903, in county Cork. Emigrated to Galveston in 1924, married Joseph East. Died in Galveston on August 26, 1982.

Michael Stephen Whelton, born on June (or January) 15, 1905, in Ireland, and who died in Jersey City, New Jersey, on November 28, 1990.

Matthew Whelton, born July 4, 1906, in county Cork, died on November 28, 1978, in Jersey City, New Jersey.

John Whelton, born and died in Ireland. He had at least two sons, Patrick Joseph Whelton, born in 1931 (whose wife's name was Mary), and Maurice Whelton, who now owns the family farm and home.

Patrick Whelton's Grandfather—Bartholomew Whelton

My wife's father's father was Bartholomew Whelton, who was born in Desert, county Cork, Ireland, in 1837. He married Johanna Hurley on February 11, 1866. They had seven children, six of whom emigrated to the United States. Only Matthew, my wife's grandfather, stayed in Ireland. B. Whelton of Gortagrenane is listed as a landholder in the parish of Rathbarry in Guy's Postal Directory, 1914, Castlefreke (Clonakilty).

Patrick Joseph Whelton, born on January 19, 1867 (but the 1900 census of Galveston says October, 1869) in Desert, married Margaret "Maggie" Bailey in Texas, and died in Galveston, Texas, on July 24, 1948. In 1900, he and his wife, Margaret, were living with Margaret's parents, Matthew and Margaret, both of whom were born in Ireland and who had been married for 35 years. At the beginning of my section below on Wheltons in Galveston, there is much more information on this family.

Matthew Tadhg Whelton, born in Desert on April 15, 1869 (the family history says he was born in 1867), married Ellen Donovan on April 15, 1899, died in Desert on December 5, 1942, buried in Darrara Cemetery [my wife's grandfather].

Mary Whelton (Baxter), born in Ireland in 1882 (?) (the family history says 1982, an obvious mistake); died in Boston. [Could her birth have been in 1872? There was a Mary Whelton, servant, of Clonakilty, age 20, aboard the Teutonic, who arrived in New York on March 9, 1892. Her declared destination was Denver, Colorado, where she intended to make her permanent residence. She was passenger 837 on the manifest (series M237, roll 583, frame 290, on the Ellis Island site). If this is the Mary Whelton who was Hanna Whelton's sister (see below), she may not have gone beyond New York. When Mary's sister Hanna arrived at Ellis Island on September 26, 1900, she said she was going to join her "sister Mary" in New York. There was no Whelton in the 1900 census of Colorado.] [There was also a Mary Whelton, age 24, a servant, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1906, listed in the 1910 census of Essex county, New Jersey (2nd Ward, West Orange; a Marie Whelton, age 30, a cook in a private home, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1902; in the 1910 census of Boston (23rd Ward); and as Mary G. Whelton, age 37, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1890, whose occupation wes housework, and who was an inmate in the Gardner State Colony, in Gardner county, Worcester county, Massachusetts, in the 1910 census.]

Michael Whelton, born in Desert, Clonakilty, on February 2, 1876; died in Galveston, Texas, on February 15, 1931. He was a Galveston policeman and lived in Galveston with his younger sister, Catherine Whelton, and her husband, Patrick Whelton. The 1920 census of Galveston (roll 1805, page 227) shows this family on 24th Street: Patrick Whelton, age 37, emigrated in 1901, naturalized, born in Ireland, merchant, soft-drink store; his wife, Katharine Whelton, age 37, emigrated in 1898, naturalized, born in Ireland; several children (see below); and Catherine's brother, Michael Whelton (described in the census as Patrick's brother-in-law), age 42, single, emigration information unknown, born in Ireland, police officer, city. The 1930 census lists Patrick Whelton, age 50, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898, manager garage; his wife, Catherine Whelton, age 51, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898; four children, and Michael Whelton+ (brother-in-law), age 54, single, born in Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898, naturalized, officer, police force. The manifest of the SS Teutonic, which sailed from Queenstown on February 8, 1899, and arrived in New York on February 16, 1899, showed Michael Whelton, age 20, a laborer, and Daniel Hurley, age 21, a laborer, on board. Both men listed their last place of residence as Clonakilty. Michael Whelton listed his destination as the residence of his cousin, Patrick Whelton, at 2702 Market Street, Galveston, Texas. Michael said his fare had been paid by his cousin. Daniel Hurley* said he had paid his own fare, and was on route to the home of his brother, Michael Hurley, also at 2702 Market Street, Galveston, Texas.

*The 1900 census of Galveston shows Michael Hurley, age 27, born in Ireland in April, 1873, who emigrated in 1894, a longshoreman, with his wife of 2 years, Annie Hurley, age 27, born in Ireland in June of 1872. There were no children, and Daniel is not listed in the 1900, census of Galveston. Michael Hurley+, age 23, born in Ireland, a laborer, arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the SS Britannic on August 9, 1895. He listed his destination as Galveston. He was traveling with Patrick Sullivan age 27, a laborer, born in Ireland, who also listed his destination as Galveston, who is almost certainly the Pat Sullivan who married Mary Whelton in Galveston in 1899. Michael Hurley is listed in the 1910 census of Galveston, age 39, born in Ireland, married 10 years, who emigrated in 1894 and was naturalized, a laborer in a monument (?) factory; with his wife of ten years, Ella, age 40, born in Ireland, mother of 2 children, both living, and their two daughters, both born in Texas: Eleanor, age 6; and Mary P., age 4.

+Michael "Welton" is listed by the 1910 census of Galveston as age 33, single, born in Ireland, a salesman for a "whisky house." He was a lodger in the home of John Hurley, Senior, age 47, married for 23 years, born in Ireland, who had emigrated in 1882 (1880 according to the 1920 and 1930 censuses), was naturalized, and who was working as a policeman for the city of Galveston. John Hurley owned his home free of a mortgage. In his home were his wife of 23 years, Margaret, age 45, born in Ireland, mother of 9 children, 7 of whom were living, and their seven living children, all born in Texas: Annie, age 21; Nellie, age 17; John Jr., age 16; Margaret, 15; Michael, age 14; Joseph, age 12; and Hannah, age 7. By the 1920 census, John Hurley was a widower. In the 1920 census of Galveston, a resident in John Hurley's household (when he was 72 and still employed by the Galveston police department) was a nephew, Daniel Hurley, age 27, single, born in Ireland, who was employed as a car repairer in a railroad shop.

Catherine "Kate" Whelton, born in Desert, Clonakilty, on August 13, 1877; married Patrick Whelton (born to John Whelton and Ellen O'Regan in Ballymacshoneen, county Cork, on August 29, 1880) in Galveston, Texas, in 1902; 6 children born in Galveston, died in Galveston, Texas on December 11, 1954. See the note under her brother, Michael Whelton, immediately above.

Hanna Whelton, born in Desert, Clonakilty, on August 10, 1880; never married; died in Galveston, Texas, on October 20, 1946. Hannah Whelton of Clonakilty arrived at Ellis Island from Queenstown on the SS Oceanic on September 26, 1900. She describes herself as a servant (the number 13-686 also appears in that column of the ship's manifest). She listed her destination as New York and the ship's manifest says she was going to join her "sister Mary" in New York. The family history says that she worked as a housekeeper for the William L. Moody and Isaac H. Kempner families in Galveston, and the Marshall Field family in Chicago. The 1920 census of Galveston (roll 1805, page 83) lists Hanna Whelton, age 32 (?), single, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1900, as a nurse in the home of Lyda (Eliza) Kempner, age 68, a widow, born in Ohio to parents born in Germany.

Maurice Whelton, born in Desert, Clonakilty, on February 28, 1884. Died in Galveston, Texas, of typhoid fever (in an epidemic) on August 15, 1904. The Ellis Island records show that Maurice Whelton arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the SS Umbria on August 22, 1903. The family history, however, says he emigrated in 1898, and lived in Galveston with his sister, Catherine. The manifest of the Umbria says that Maurice Whelton, age 19, a single male single laborer, whose last resided in Timoleague, and whose destination was Galveston, Texas. The manifest says that Maurice had paid his own fare and had never before been in the US, and was going to the home of brother, Michael, at 2713 Post Office Street, Galveston. Maurice was traveling with two other persons from Timoleague, both of whom were born in Ireland, who also listed their destination as 2713 Post Office Street, Galveston: Cornelius Whelton, age 22, a single male laborer, a US citizen who had been naturalized in Galveston county on October 21, 1898, and who was returning to the US; and Hannah Sullivan, age 22, a single female servant, who is described as "a resident returning to sister." I believe "cousin" appears in the space with Hannah Sullivan's name, but the word is difficult to read. [The 1900 census of Galveston lists in the family of Pat Sullivan, age 30, born in 1870 in Ireland, a cotton jammer; his wife of one year, Mary Sullivan, age 23, born in May, 1877, in Ireland, who emigrated in 1895 and had been in the US 5 years; Patrick Sullivan's brother-in-law, Con Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who emigrated in 1896 and had been in the US 4 years; a cotton screwman; and Patrick Sullivan's cousin, Dennis Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who also emigrated in 1896, had been in the US 4 years, and was working as a cotton screwman.]

[World Family Tree, volume 54, tree 2010, lists a Cornelius Whelton (estimated birth year 1827 to 1847), who married Margaret Ahern, as a son of Bartholomew and Johanna Hurley Whelton. ???]

[Here is a note from Mary Tess Ahearn on her web page: Pokeshaw O'Hearn, Whelton, Madden, Murphy, Ahern & Salter's on Genealogy.com (Pock Shaw, often spelled Pokeshaw or Pockshaw, is in New Bandon parish, Gloucester county, New Brunswick, Canada):

"Also my Mom is a Whelton. ... Any Descendants of Bartholomew (Bat) Whelton who married Johannah Hurley from Kinsale parish, Ireland, who immigrated from Ireland around 1824, please contact me! There are still some missing uncles & aunts families in my research so far. Tess."

A Bartholomew Whelton, who was born in 1795 and died in 1865, is buried in St. Simon & St. Jude Roman Catholic, Gloucester county, New Brunswick, Canada. The cemetery records show that he was husband of Johannah Hurley. (?)

The Index to New Brunswick Land Grants [1784–1997] lists a grant of 50 acres to Bartholomew Whelton in New Bandon, Gloucester county, on June 6, 1871. This is Bartholomew B. Whelton, probably a son of the Bartholomew Whelton mention in the preceding paragraph who was born in 1795 and who married Annie Ryne. The younger Bartholomew is also buried in St. Simon & St. Jude Roman Catholic, Gloucester county, New Brunswick, Canada. The cemetery records show that he was born in 1825 and died at the age of 80 on October 22, 1905. Several other Wheltons are buried in the same cemetery. See: Provincial Cemeteries in the Provincial Records of New Brunswick, Canada. There were several Hurleys buried in the same cemetery, but I found neither a Johannah Whelton nor a Johannah Hurley. There were later grants of land in the same place to Edward Whelton on June 4, 1900, and James Whelton on July 14, 1902. See: Provincial Records of New Brunswick, Canada.

The Hutchinson Directory of 1865–1866 lists two Bartholomew Wheltons in Pockshaw, Gloucester county, New Brunswick. Both are listed as farmers. A street is shown for one: Black Rock. Three other Wheltons are listed as farmers, Cornelius, John and Michael. John is also shown on Black Rock Street. The directory for 1866–1867 lists the same five Wheltons, but one of the Bartholomews and John Whelton are listed in the community of Black Rock, and the other three are listed in the community of Pockshaw. There is only one Bartholomew listed in Levinson's Directory of 1871, but the other four are listed in the community of Pock Shaw, New Bandon parish, Gloucester county. ]

 

Patrick Whelton's Great-Grandfather—William Whelton; and Great-Great-Grandfather—Bartholomew Whelton

My wife's father's father's father was William Whelton, who was born in Desert, Clonakilty, county Cork, Ireland in 1810. He died in Desert on March 17, 1890. He married Ellen Mahoney. Their second child, and only son, was Bartholomew Whelton, who was born in 1837. William married for a second time, to Honora Hodnett, on January 17, 1850, by whom he had five more children. This is probably the William Welton listed by Griffith's Valuation in Desert parish. The family history says he was a farmer tenant of the Earl of Shannon, holding 14 acres and 3 rods.

The father of the William Whelton who was born in 1810 was Bartholomew Whelton who was born in Desert, Clonakilty, county Cork, Ireland, 1780.

All the children of William Whelton were born in Desert, county Cork, Ireland. William fathered ten children, five by his first wife, Ellen Mahoney, and five by his second wife, Honora Hodnett. Here is the information recorded in the family history, which refers to the Clonikilty Parish register:

Marriage to Ellen Mahoney:

Mary Whelton, born in 1835 (February 6, 1835, according to the Cooper Family Tree on Ancestry.com, where it is stated that she married John O'Leary who was born in Ireland in 1833, and was the mother of Patrick Joseph O'Leary, 1874–1939, who was born in Holburn, England, married Agnes Louisa Cullen, fathered Ellen O'Leary (1908–1975) who married Cyril Charles Greene (1909–1994), and died at age 65 in Enfield, England. See the email of May 18, 2010, from Ruth Cowley, below.)

Bartholomew Whelton, born in 1837.

Ellen Whelton, born in 1839.

Catherine Whelton, born in 1842.

Anne Whelton, born in 1847.

Marriage to Honora Hodnett on January 17, 1850:

Honora Whelton, born in 1851, baptized on March 27, 1851.

Mathias Joseph (Matthew) Whelton, born in 1853, baptized on March 10, 1853.

Bridget Whelton, born in 1855, baptized on November 10, 1855.

Joan Whelton, born in 1858, baptized on April 21, 1858.

Maurice Whelton, born in 1860, baptized on August 13, 1860.

Here is an email I received on May 18, 2010:

Dear Hugh

My name is Ruth Cowley and I live in Warwickshire in England. I have been tracing my family tree and found your website relating to the Whelton’s of Clonakilty. My great great grandmother was Mary Whelton daughter of William Whelton and Ellen Mahoney (his first wife) they had only one son Bartholomew (who you mention on your web site) who I think died young but he also had 3 (in addition to Mary?) daughters Mary born 1835, Ellen b. 1839, Catherine b. 1842 and Ann b1847.

When her mother died Mary left Clonakilty (Desert) for Dublin where she caught a coal boat to Liverpool from there she walked to London. Accompanying her on this journey was another Mary Whelton her cousin I think, borne 1827 daughter of Maurice Whelton and Julia Calnan. They ended up in London living in ‘the buildings’ along with some other male Whelton family members. The Buildings these were cramped buildings where many Irish families lived in pretty poor conditions. She was a street trader. She married John O’Leary and had 6 children. Her son Patrick O’Leary is my Great Grandfather. His wife Agnes Cullen was very close to Mary and she passed this oral history down to my Grandmother Ellen O’Leary (Nellie) and then to my mother and then to myself. I have a photo of Mary Whelton and my mother knows lots more details of her life.

I think the other three daughters of William stayed with the family after his first wife died and he then married Hanora Hoddnet and had another family. Is it this family that your wife links to? I recently made a visit to Clonakilty with my mother and sister and met some of the Whelton family still living there and they mentioned your research about the Wheltons.

I thought I would make contact with you to let you know about Mary and her story. Please feel free to contact me if you would like any more information.

Kind Regards

Ruth

The William Whelton mentioned in this email was born in Desert, Clonakilty, Cork, in 1810, and died on May 17, 1880. In my reply to Ruth, I mentioned that William's son and Mary's brother, Bartholomew, born in 1837, did not "die young," but rather lived until December 2, 1905. He married Johanna Hurley on February 11, 1866. They had seven children, including their oldest, my wife's grandfather, Matthew Tadhg Whelton who was born in Ireland on April 15, 1869 (or in 1867 according to the family history). (see above).

Griffith's Valuation—County Cork—Whelton, Welton

The following 23 Wheltons are listed in The Index to Griffith's Valuation of Ireland, 1848–1864, CD #188, Family Tree Maker's Family Archives. I have added the 14 Weltons that I found listed in county Cork by Griffith's, and I believe that this is a misspelling of Whelton. (There are also a few Weldons in county Cork, but I do not list them.) There were three Weltion families in Ireland, all in west county Cork, Kilmacabea parish, Corran Middle: Bartholomew Weltion, John Weltion and Michael Weltion. Weltion is probably a misspelling of Whelton. Michael Whelton leased land to Jeremiah Driscoll in the townland of Corran Middle, Kilmadabea parish, at the time of Griffith's Valuation.

Abbeymahon parish, Aghafore, Timothy Whelton [Abbeymahon is #1 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, immediately south of the parish of Timoleague, and immediately northwest of Lislee. Lislevane is in this parish. The civil parish of Abbeymahon corresponds to the Catholic parish of Donoughmore.]

Abbeymahon parish, Currahy, John Whelton

Abbeymahon parish, Lehenagh, John Whelton

Abbeymahon parish, Lislevane, Ellen Whelton

Abbeymahon parish, Lislevane, Matthew Whelton

Abbeymahon parish, Lislevane, Michael Whelton

Abbeymahon parish, Lislevane, Patrick Whelton.

Here are excerpts from an email of March 22, 2008, from Frank Donovan:

"My name is Frank Donovan, a great grandchild of Mary Whelton of Creggane, County Cork. Creggane (Abbeymahon parish) townland is immediately south of Timoleague. ...

"I have very little information about the Whelton branch of my family, except for my grandfather's birth registration.

"Here is the information from the birth registration:

Timothy Donovan
born 23 April 1874 in Creggane, Abbeymahon, County Cork
Father: James Donovan
Mother: Mary Whelton."

The marriage of James Donovan, age 27, and Mary Whelton, age 25, was solemnized at the Roman Catholic chapel of Ardfield in the Union of Clonakilty, on February 9, 1871. James Donovan was a farmer who resided at Cregane (sic), the son of Timothy Donovan, a farmer. Mary Whelton was a farmer's daughter who resided at Dunowen, the daughter of William Whelton, a farmer. The marriage was presided over by the Reverend A. O'Leary, P.P. A copy of the marriage registration was sent me by Frank Donovan on April 3, 2010, who informs me that William Whelton is listed in the 1851–1853 Griffiths Valuation of Ireland for Dunowen, Ardfield, County Cork; and Timothy Donovan is listed in the 1851–1853 Griffiths Valuation of Ireland for Creggane, Abbeymahon, County Cork.

The two most common surnames in Abbeymahon in 1851–3 were Dricoll and Donovan with 23 families each. Irish Ancestors. There were several Donovans, including a Timothy Donovan, in the townland of Creggane in 1851–3, and several Wheltons in other townlands in the civil parish of Abbeymahon. See: Griffiths Primary Valuation—County Cork—Ireland—Abbeymahon Civil Parish, Barony of Ibane & Barryroe—Union of Clonakilty.

[Guy's Postal Directory of Ardfield for 1914 lists John Whelton of Dunowen among the Landholders of Ardfield Parish.]

Ardfield parish, Dunowen, Margaret Whelton [Ardfield is #26, in two parts, in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors. The town of Dunowen is about 1 kilometer south by southwest of the town of Ardfield, on the southwest coast of Clonakilty Bay. See MapQuest.The townland of Dunowen consists of 559 acres within the parish of Ardfield.]

Ardfield parish, Dunowen, Matthew Whelton, Jr.

Ardfield parish, Dunowen, Matthew Whelton, Sr.

Ardfield parish, Dunowen, William Whelton [Listed in Francis Guy's Directory of Cork 1875–1876.]

Ballinaboy parish, Ballyhooleen, Florence Whelton [Ballinaboy is #5 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, at the northeast corner of West Cork.]

Ballymartle parish, Coolkirky, John Welton

Ballymodan parish, Clancool Road, Bandon, Catherine Whelton

Desert parish, Desert, David Welton [The civil parish of Desert includes part of the Catholic parish of Clonakilty.]

Desert parish, Desert, Maurice Welton

Desert parish, Desert, Maurice Welton (Timoleague Road, Clonakilty)

Desert parish, Desert, Michael Welton [Probably the Michael Whelton who was born in desert in 1804, married Catherine Regan in 1833, and died in Ireland on August 3, 1897. Father of David Whelton, born in Desert in 1837; Maurice Whelton, born in Desert in 1839; and Michael Whelton, born in Desert in 1842; William Whelton, born in 1850; ten children all together]

Desert parish, Desert, William Welton [probably my wife's great-great grandfather]

Island Parish, Islands, Inchycloney Islands, Mary Welton

Kilgarriff Parish, Tawnies Upper/T/Clonakilty/Patrick Street, Thomas Welton (There were many Donovan families in Tawnies Upper) [The civil parish of Kilgattiff includes part of the Catholic parish of Clonakilty.]

Lislee parish, Lisleecourt, Cornelius Whelton. [The civil parish of Lislee includes part of the Catholic parish of Barryroe.]

Lislee parish, Lisleecourt, Daniel Whelton [Lislee is #51 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, immediately southeast of Abbeymahon

Lislee parish, Lisleecourt, Patrick Whelton

Myross parish, Ardagh, Daniel Whelton [Myross if #53 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, immediately north of Lislee and Abbeymahon, and immediately northeast of Timoleague.]

Rathbarry parish, Ballylibert, David Whelton [Rathbarry is #54 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, immediately west of Ardfield, and immediately east of Ross. The civil parish of Rathbarry is included in the Catholic parish of Ardfield and Rathbarry.]

Rathbarry parish, Donoure, Bridget Whelton

Rathbarry parish, Lisduff, David Whelton

Rathclarin parish, Ardaclow, William Welton

Rathclarin parish, Glanduff, Cornelius Welton

Rathclarin parish, Lisheenaleen , Bartholomew Welton

Rathclarin parish, Lisheenaleen, Patrick Welton

Ross parish, Knocknageehy, David Whelton [Ross parish is #58 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, immediately west of Rathbarry.]

Ross parish, Knocknageehy, John Whelton

Templetrine parish, Rochestown, William Welton

Templeomalus parish, Cruary West, James Whelton [Templeomalus parish is #63 in the table of civil parishes of West Cork on Irish Ancestors, one parish removed to the east of Abbeymahon, and to the southeast of Timoleague. The civil parish of Templeomalus includes part of the Catholic parish of Clonakilty.]

Templeomalus parish, Lackenduff, Michael Whelton

Variations in the Irish Spelling of Whelton and Houlihan

Here is a list of various spellings of Whelton/Houlihan from Traynor's Web Page:

"Why do we see various spellings of Irish names? In the first place, there was often more than one spelling of the names in the Irish language. Then the Irish names were translated to English, phonetically, or by meaning, or by using an English name that was similar. Then there were variations in the translated spellings. If you are confused because there are two or three variations of your name, then look at these variations of the Irish name of O'h-Uallachain; uallach, ("proud, haughty, merry, supple, vain"), uallchan, ("a coxcomb, a fop").

"MacUallachain, MacCuolahan, O'Holohan, Colaghan, Coolacan, Collaghan, Halahan, Halegan, Halligan, Holahan, Holhane, Holhgane, Holighan, Holland, Holligan, Hoolaghan, Hoolaghane, Hoolahan, Houlaghan, Houlaghane, Houlahan, Howlegan, Howlan, Hulegan, Huolaghane, Olehan, Oulahan, Oullaghan, Oullahan, Woolahan, and Merrie, Merry, FitzMerry, Mac-Merry, Nolan (of Mayo), Noland (in England), Proud, Proude, Soople, Suple, Supple, Vain, Vane, Whelton, and Wilton."

Father Michael Whelton of South Africa provided this history of the Whelton name to the family history:

"The Irish Whelton name was originally O'Hullachain, then progressed through Holohan in 1773, Helton, Holteen, Holtin, Hulahan, Houlten, Houltin and became Whelton in 1814, Wholtin in 1815 and from 1829 Whelton. Since the people spoke Gaelic, the parish priest masking the entries in the register spelled the names his way."

Father Whelton could have added these variation from the 1796 Flax Seed Premium Entitlement Lists: Houlahan, Houlahane, Houlehane, and Houlton. There was no Whelton or Welton in county Cork on the list of Irish Flax Growers, 1796, but there were these names:

Houlten John Ardfield Cork
Houltin Cornelius Rathbarry Cork
Houlton Cornelius Castleventry Cork
Houlton William Ardfield Cork

On the flax growers' list, there was also a James Houlahane of Kilkerranmore (and a Cornelius Merigough of Fanlobbus). There were eight Houlehan families, and one Houlahan family, in county Kerry.

Driscoll Baptism Sponsors, 1808–1876, for Roman Catholic Parish of Ardfield & Rathbarry, includes at least two of each of these surnames: Houllen, Houlten, Houlahane; one Holtin; and several Wheltons and Wheltens.

Wheltons in Galveston

My wife's parents were not the first Wheltons from the Clonakilty area emigrate to Galveston. Patrick J. Whelton was a brother of was my wife's father. He was born in Clonakilty, county Cork, Ireland, on January 19, 1867. He is listed on the manifest of the SS Gallia (line 1210) which arrived in New York on April 24, 1891: Patrick Whelton, 23, born in Ireland, laborer, main steerage, embarked from Queenstown, destination New York, one piece of luggage. The 1900 census of Galveston (roll 1637, page 186) lists him as 30 years old, born in Ireland in October, 1869. In 1900, he had been married to Margaret Bailey for 2 years, who was 27 years old, and born in Texas to Irish parents in November of 1872. The 1900 census return says that Patrick J. Whelton had immigrated to the US in 1880 (later census returns indicate that 1888 is a more probable date), had been in the US for 20 years, and was a naturalized citizen. He and Margaret had had one child at the time of the 1900 census: Mary R. Whelton, who was born in August, 1899, and was nine months old. Patrick, his wife, and daughter, were living with his wife's parents, Matthew (age 60) and Margaret (age 58) Bailey, both of whom had been born in Ireland. The senior Baileys had been married for 35 years, and had had 2 children. Matthew Bailey was a retired blacksmith who had emigrated in 1845 and spent 55 years in the US. Pat Whelton's occupation was listed as "saloon keeper."

The Galveston, Texas City Directories, 1888–91 (on Ancestry.com) list a Patrick Whelton in 1888 and 1889: "Location 2: rooms northwest corner E. Market, 20th; Business Name: J. P. Fadden ; Occupation: bartender."

Patrick J. Whelton is listed in the 1910 census of Galveston (roll 1554, page 271) on Avenue M 1/2 as Patrick H. Whelton, age 40, a US customs inspector, married 11 years, who had emigrated in 1892, and was a naturalized citizen; with his wife Margaritte M., age 37, born in Texas, mother of 4 children, all living, and their 4 children: Mary M. Whelton, age 10 (born in Galveston on August 26, 1899); Matthew B. Whelton, age 6 (born in Galveston on October 16, 1903); Frances J. Whelton (son), age 4 (according to the family history, John Francis Whelton, born in Galveston on July 16, 1905); and Hannah C., Whelton age 2 (born in Galveston on April 15, 1908). In 1910, the Patrick J. Whelton family had a live-in cook, Louise Sewell, age 54, a widow, born in Tennessee.

Another son, Patrick Joseph Whelton, had been born in Galveston on July 1, 1902, and died there on December 13, 1902. Children born after the 1910 census were Eileen Whelton (who married Tom Watson), born in Galveston on October 10, 1910; and Agnes Whelton, born in Galveston on June 21, 1914 (and died on August 25, 1941, according to the Social Security Death Index).

Here is the listing of the Patrick J. Whelton family in the 1920 census of Galveston (roll 1806, page 128), with dates of death added from the family history:

Patrick J. Whelton (head), owner of home free of mortgage, age 47, emigrated in 1895 (?), naturalized in 1897, born in Ireland, inspector, customs. [Died in Galveston on July 24, 1948]

Margaret Whelton (wife), age 45, born in Texas. [Died in Galveston in 1837]

Mary Whelton (daughter), age 20, born in Texas [Mary M. Whelton, born in Galveston on August 26, 1899, and died there on July 2, 1985.].

Matthew Whelton (son), age 16, born in Texas. [Mathew B. Whelton, born in Galveston on October 6, 1903, and died there on February 1, 1975.]

Francis Whelton (son), age 14, born in Texas. [John Francis Whelton, born in Galveston on July 16, 1905, and died there on July 2, 1960.]

Hannah Whelton (daughter), age 11, born in Texas. [Hannah C. Whelton, born in Galveston on April 15, 1908, and died there as Mrs. Joe East on November 1, 1983.]

Eileen Whelton (daughter), age 9, born in Texas. [Born in Galveston on October 10, 1910, and died there (as Mrs. Tom Watson) on March 19, 1977.]

Agnes Whelton (daughter), age 5, born in Texas. [Born in Galveston on June 21, 1914, and died there on August 25, 1991.]

Patrick J. Whelton's son, Matthew Bartholomew Whelton, also became a customs inspector. He was born in Galveston on October 16, 1903; married Ann Angela Schattel (January 26, 1907–November 4, 1995); and died in Galveston on February 1, 1975. He was the father of Margaret Ann Whelton who was was born in Galveston on August 1, 1935, who married Joseph Anthony Raitano (the football coach at Kirwin High School). Margaret Ann sent me the Whelton family history that I have often mentioned on this page.

In the 1930 census of Galveston (roll 2334, book 2, page 216b), Mathew Whelton, age 26, was listed as a customs inspector, single, living with his father, Patrick, age 58, married 28 years, who had emigrated in 1888, and whose occupation was shown as a statistical clerk for the government. In the same household was Patrick's wife, Margaret, age 58; daughter Mary, age 30; son Francis, age 23, a clerk for the railroad; daughter, Hannah, age 21, a typist for an insurance company; a daughter, Eileen, age 18, a typist for an insurance company (who married Tom Watson); and a daughter, Agnes, age 15. The sons and daughters listed were all born in Texas and single.

My wife says that the home of Patrick J. and Margaret (Maggie) Bailey Whelton was always perfect, and there were oriental rugs in every room. She also says that Agnes Whelton, who never married, and Agnes' aunt, Hannah Whelton, who also never married, were frequent visitors to her family home in Galveston when she was growing up.

Patrick J. Whelton paid the fare of my wife Teel's father's sister, Hannah Whelton, from Ireland to Galveston. Hannah married Joe East in Galveston. In the 1930 census of Galveston (roll 2335, page 114), this family is listed on 41st Street:

Joseph East, age 37, born in Louisiana, a house carpenter.

Hanah East (wife), age 26, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1924, naturalized [my wife's aunt].

Joseph East, Jr. (son), age 2 years, 4 months, born in Texas.

Stephen Whelton (brother in law), age 25, single born in Irish Free State, emigrated in 1926, al., office clerk, railroad. [my wife's uncle]

Mathew Whelton (brother in law), age 23, single, born in Irish Free State, emigrated in 1929, al., apprentice house carpenter. [my wife's uncle]

Mathew Whelton was an apprentice to his brother in law, Joe East. Stephen and Mathew Whelton were brothers of my wife's father, and her uncles. Each remembered her in his will.

Hanna Whelton (who married Joseph East), age 19, arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the Celtic on August 18, 1924. The index card on the Ellis Island website gives her residence as "Clouskelty Co. Cork, Ireland." The manifest says "Cloakilty." These names doubtless should be Clonakilty. Hanna was a sister of my wife's father, Patrick Whelton (and must be distinguished from her aunt Hannah Whelton, my wife's father's sister, who was born in Ireland on August 10, 1880, and died in Galveston on October 20, 1946; and from Hannah C. Whelton, daughter of Patrick Joseph and Margaret Whelton, who was born in Galveston on April 15, 1908, and died there on November 1, 1983). Her fare had been paid by her uncle, Patrick. J. Whelton (brother of the older Hannah, and father of the younger Hannah), whose address is shown as "c/o Custom House, Galveston, Texas." Her immigration visa, No. 10054, had been issued at Cobh, Ireland, on July 24, 1924.

Here is a note from the family history: Anne Bailey. a sister of Margaret Bailey (Mrs. Patrick J.) Whelton, married Francis J. Wilson, whose granddaughter, Lenan Wilson, was born in Galveston on August 11, 1927. Lenan Wilson married John P. Whelton, Jr., in Texas on November 27, 1948. [Galveston birth records for 1949 show a James Peter Whelton born to James Patrick Whelton and Lenan Marie Wilson on July 12, 1949.] This makes John P. Whelton, Jr., born in Texas on November 20, 1927, a relative of both Whelton clans. His grandmother was his wife's aunt. This is the John P. Whelton, Jr., of Lamarque, Texas, who is the compiler of the basic family history.

On the manifest of the SS Campania, which arrived in New York from on August 13, 1897, are these four single men, all from Timoleague, Cork, all destined for Galveston, Texas, all with tickets to Galveston that they bought themselves, all laborers, and traveling on four consecutively numbered tickets:

Timothy Sullivan, age 22, going to join a sister, H. Sullivan, at 827 Avenue G, Galveston, Texas.

Cornelius Whelton, age 22, going to join a sister, E. Whelton, at 275 Avenue I, Galveston, Texas. [This was probably the Ellen Whelton who emigrated in 1896 from Clonakilty to Galveston at age 20. The Ellis Island web shows her arriving in New York from Queenstown, on August 19, 1896, aboard the Majestic. Ellen Whelton returned to Ireland and came back from Queenstown through New York on the Oceanic on October 24, 1900. This manifest lists her as a US resident for 4 years, who had returned to Clonakilty for a visit, whose address in Galveston was 2713 Post Office Street. With Ellen was her brother, Patrick Whelton, age 20, a laborer, whose last residence was Clonakilty, and whose destination was Galveston, and who was coming to the US for the first time to join his sister, Ellen, in Galveston. See below. In 1900, Con Whelton was living with his sister, Mary Whelton, her husband, Pat Sullivan, and her cousin, Dennis Whelton. See the note on Denis Whelton, one paragraph removed and below.]

Denis Hurley, age 20, going to join a brother, J. Hurley, at 2775 Post Office Street. Galveston, Texas. [Note that Bartholomew Whelton, my wife's great-grandfather, married Johanna Hurley, and their son, Matthew (Tadhg) Whelton, my wife's grandfather, was one of seven children of Bartholomew Whelton and Johanna Hurley, born on April 15, 1869. The 1910 census of Galveston lists Dennis Hurley, age 32, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1898, working as a wholesale liquor merchant; with his wife, Ella, age 30, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1896; and two children, Mary E., age 2, and Daniel E., age 9 months, both born in Texas. The 1920 census of Galveston lists Dennis as age 48, with his wife Ella and children. Dennis was working as a cotton screwman.]

[The 1910 census of Galveston also lists Timothy Hurley, age 40, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1892, married 15 years, a screwman—cotton; his wife of 15 years, Ella, age 35, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1882, mother of 6 children, 5 living, with 5 children, all born in Texas. Timothy is listed in the 1900 census (ward 6, page 139A, enumeration district #125, sheet 2; misindexed by Ancestry.com as Th Harby) at 907 34th Street as age 30, born in Ireland in May 1870, married 5 years, who emigrated in 1890 and was naturalized, a cotton screwman; with his wife Ella, age 27, born in Ireland in May, 1873, mother of one child who was living, and their son, Mikle, age 2, born in Texas in March, 1898; in the 1920 census as age 48, emigrated in 1892; and in the 1930 census as 62 years old, married at age 28. There was a Timothy Hurley, age 24, from Kerry, Ireland, with a destination of Texas (unusual on New York City manifests), aboard the City of Chicago when it arrived in New York from Queenstown and Liverpool on August 22, 1891.]

Denis Whelton, age 21, going to join a sister, M. Whelton, at 275 Avenue I, Galveston, Texas. [Mary Whelton was born in Ireland in May of 1877, emigrated to the US in 1896, and married Pat Sullivan in Galveston in 1899. The 1900 census of Galveston, lists Dennis Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in April, 1875, who emigrated in 1896, a cotton screwman, a cousin, living with Pat Sullivan, age 30, born in Ireland in 1870, a cotton jammer; Pat's wife, Mary (Whelton), age 23, single, born in Ireland in May, 1877, who emigrated in 1885, had been married one year, and had no children. In the same household was Con Whelton, a brother-in-law, age 24, single, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who emigrated in 1896, a cotton screwman. The 1910 census of Galveston lists Dennis Whelton, age 33, born in Ireland, married 7 years, emigrated in 1899, naturalized, a laborer on a wharf; his wife of 7 years, Mary, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1898, mother of 3 children, 3 living; and their 3 children, all born in Texas: Margaret M., age 6; Catherine U., age 5; and Helen, age 1 year ad 3 months. The 1920 census of Galveston lists Dennis Whelton (misindexed by Ancestry.com as Whitton), age 48, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1884 and was naturalized in 1903, a screwman on a wharf; with his wife, Mary, age 42, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1901, and their five children, all born in Texas: Margaret, age 16; Ursula, age 15; Dennis, age 9; Michael, age 6; and Joseph, age 1 year and 1 month.]

The 1900 census of Galveston (roll 1637, page 136) lists a Dennis Whelton, age 24, single, who was born in December, 1875, in Ireland. He had emigrated in 1896 and been in the US for 4 years. He had applied for naturalization papers. He was a cotton screwman. He was living with his cousin, Mary (Whelton) Sullivan, age 23, born in Ireland in May, 1877, who had been married for 1 year to Patrick Sullivan, and had no children. Dennis' sister, Mary Whelton Sullivan, had emigrated to the US in 1895 and had spent 5 years in the US. Her husband, Pat Sullivan, was 30 years old, and had been born in Ireland in 1870. He had emigrated in 1890, had been in the US for 10 years, and was a naturalized citizen. He was a cotton jammer. Also in the same household was Mary Whelton's brother, Con Whelton, age 24, single, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who had emigrated in 1896 (actually in 1897, with his cousin Dennis Whelton) and who had been in the US for 4 years. He had applied for naturalization papers. He was also working as a cotton screwman.

Cornelius Whelton returned to Ireland for a visit in 1903. He returned to New York from Queenstown aboard the SS Umbria on August 22, 1903. The ship's manifest shows him as age 22, a laborer, a citizen of the US, from Timoleague, returning to 2713 Post Office Street, Galveston, Texas. With him were Maurice Whelton, age 19, born in Ireland, whose last residence was Timoleague, who had not been in the US before, and who was going to join his brother, Michael Whelton, at 2713 Post Office Street, Galveston; and Hannah Sullivan (Cousin ?), age 22, from Timoleague, a resident of the US returning to her sister at 2713 Post Office Street, Galveston.

Dennis Whelton almost certainly a relative, because his second oldest daughter, Ursula Whelton (Ursula Whelton Combs was born in Galveston in 1905, and died there on August 13, 1974), was the god-mother of my wife's sister, Ellen Whelton, and remained close to her through her life. (Ellen was blessed with a very generous god-mother. Ursula sent a nice present to Ellen every year on Ellen's birthday.) Dennis Whelton was born in Ireland on August 15, 1874, married Mary Ann Kirby in Galveston in about 1902, and died in Galveston on September 2, 1942. Mary Ann Kirby was born in county Clare, Ireland, on October 18, 1874, and died (as Mary Whelton) in Galveston on October 29, 1951. The Ellis Island website lists a Mary Kirby, age 20, born in Ireland, who arrived at New York from Queenstown, on August 19, 1896, aboard the Majestic. She was listed as a servant; her destination was Galveston, and she was in the United States for a protracted sojourn. Traveling with her, and listed next to her on the ship's manifest, were two other 20 year old Irish girls, also listed as servants, whose destination was Galveston: Ellen Whelton and Annie Sexton (for more, see below).

Dennis Whelton is listed in the 1910 census of Galveston (roll 1554, page 290) on Avenue N as the head of a household, age 33, married 7 years, born in Ireland, who had emigrated in 1894, had been naturalized, a laborer on the wharf; living with his wife, Mary, age 33, born in Ireland, married 7 years, mother of three children, 3 living; and their 3 children, all born in Texas: Margaret M., age 6 (Lewis, died in Galveston in1978); Catherine U. (in later censuses, Ursula), age 5 (Combs, died in Galveston on August 12, 1974); and Helen G., age 1 and 3 months. Ursula married Owen Lee Combs, brother of Almon P. Combs. See: Combs &c. Families of Galveston County, Texas. This appears to have been a short-lied marriage, since Ursula lived alone in her later years.

Dennis Whelton is listed in the 1920 census of Galveston (roll 1805, page 199) on Avenue N as owner of his home free of a mortgage, age 48, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1889, and was naturalized in 1903, a screwman on the wharf; living with his wife, Mary, age 42, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1901 and had been naturalized; with 5 children, all born in Texas: Margaret, age 16, a cashier in a dry goods store; Ursula, age 15; Dennis, age 9 (born on September 7, 1910; died in Galveston on March 16, 1971); Michael, age 6 (died in Galveston on January 6, 1949); and Joseph, age 1 year and 1 month (Joseph Andrew Whelton, born in Galveston on November 30, 1918; moved to Connecticut in 1946).

Dennis Whelton is listed in the 1930 census of Galveston (roll 2334, page 233) on East 25th Street as age 49 (one year older then the 1920 census), married 21 years, born in Ireland, emigration information unknown, a police officer for the city; living with his wife, Mary, age 49, born in Ireland, emigration information unknown; and 4 children, all born in Texas: Ursula, age 25, keeping house; Dennis J., age 19, office clerk; Michael, age 17; Joseph, age 11.

The Ellis Island website lists an Ellen Whelton, age 20, born in Ireland, who arrived at New York from Queenstown, on August 19, 1896, aboard the Majestic. She was listed as a servant; her destination was Galveston, and she was in the United States for a protracted sojourn. Traveling with her, and listed next to her on the ship's manifest, were two other 30 year old Irish girls, also listed as servants, whose destination was Galveston: Mary Kirby and Annie Sexton. Also on the manifest with destination of Galveston were Timy (or Jimy) Sullivan, age 24, laborer, and Hannah Sullivan, age 30, servant.

The 1910 census of Galveston shows Patrick Whelton, age 40 (probably should be 30), born in Ireland, living on Avenue M 1/2 (roll 1554, page 220), married 7 years (married in St. Mary's Cathedral in Galveston on November 18, 1902), who emigrated in 1896 and was a naturalized citizen, working as a screwman on the docks; living with his wife, Catherine, age 30, who was born in Ireland and emigrated in 1898 , mother of 3 children, all living; and their 3 children, all born in Texas: John P., age 6; Michael J., age 4; and Mary Francis (sic), age 2. World Family Tree, volume 88, tree 662. lists a John Patrick Whelton, born in Galveston, Texas, on December 30, 1903. He was the son of Patrick Whelton had his wife, Margaret. John Patrick married Ellen Mabel Garner, and they had these children: Katherine Maureen Whelton, who married Vincent Martin DiMarre, who was born in Galveston on August 27, 1933, and died in Las Vegas on April 4, 1993; Ellen Patricia Whelton; John Patrick Whelton, Jr.; and Robert Cornelius Whelton. In the 1930 census (roll 2334 page 220), John P. Whelton, age 26, proprietor of an auto repair shop, was married to Ellen, age 19, with 2 young children, Ellen and John, Jr.; the family was living on Avenue K (see below).

The 1920 census of Galveston (roll 1805, page 227) shows this family on 24th Street:

Patrick Whelton, age 37, emigrated in 1901, naturalized, born in Ireland, merchant, soft-drink (?) store.

Katharine Whelton, age 37, emigrated in 1898, naturalized, born in Ireland.

John Whelton, age 16, born in Texas, clerk, soft drink store. [Born December 30, 1903, in Galveston; married Ellen Mabel Garner; died in Lamarque, Texas, on March 26, 1984. See World Family Tree, volume 88, tree 662, for his children. The 1930 census of Galveston lists, on Avenue K, John P. Whelton, age 26, born in Texas to parents born in Ireland, the proprietor of an auto repair shop; his wife Ellen N. Whelton, age 24, born in Texas; their daughter, Ellen P. Whelton, age 3 (born on May 31, 1926), born in Texas; and son, John P. Whelton, Jr., age 2 years, 4 months (born November 20, 1927), born in Texas.]

Joseph Whelton, age 13, born in Texas. [Michael J. Whelton in 1910 census.]

Francis M. Whelton (daughter), age 11, born in Texas.

Emmett Whelton, age 8, born in Texas.

Helen Whelton, age 6, born in Texas.

Michael Whelton (brother in law), age 42, single, emigration information unknown, born in Ireland, police officer, city.

The 1930 census shows this family on 27th Street in Galveston (roll 2334, page 263):

Patrick Whelton, age 50, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898, manager garage.

Catherine Whelton, age 51, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898,

Joseph Whelton, age 24, born in Texas, collector, travel insurance,

Emmett Whelton, age 19, born in Texas, collector, auto garage.

Helen Whelton, age 16, born in Texas.

Francis Kemp (?) (daughter), age 21, born in Texas.

Michael Whelton (brother in law), age 54, single, born in Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898, naturalized, officer, police force.

In addition to my wife's father's family, there was another branch of Wheltons from west county Cork that settled in Galveston in the 1890s and early 1900s. At least 6 or the 9 children of John Whelton and Ellen O'Regan of Ballymacshoneen, Cork, emigrated to Galveston. According to the family history, John Whelton was born in Ballymacshoneen, country Cork, in 1850, married Ellen O'Regan, and had nine children:

Cornelius "Con" Whelton, born in Ireland in 1875. On the manifest of the SS Campania, which arrived in New York from on August 13, 1897, was Cornelius Whelton, age 22, going to join a sister, E. Whelton, at 275 Avenue I, Galveston, Texas. This was Ellen Whelton who emigrated in 1896 from Clonakilty to Galveston at age 20. (see below). The 1901–1902 directory of Galveston, Texas, lists Cornelius Whelton, a screwman, boarding at 2713 Post Office Street. Cornelius Whelton also arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the SS Umbria on August 22, 1903, on a return from a visit to Ireland. He was listed on the 1903 manifest as age 22, a single male laborer, a US citizen who had been naturalized in Galveston county on October 21, 1898, and who was returning to the US. Traveling with him were Maurice Whelton and Hannah Sullivan, age 22, a single female servant, who is described as "a resident returning to sister." The 1900 census of Galveston lists in the family of Pat Sullivan, age 30, born in 1870 in Ireland, a cotton jammer; his wife of one year, Mary Sullivan, age 23, born in May, 1877, in Ireland, who emigrated in 1895 and had been in the US 5 years; Patrick Sullivan's brother-in-law, Con (Cornelius) Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who emigrated in 1896 and had been in the US 4 years; a cotton screwman; and Patrick Sullivan's cousin, Dennis Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who also emigrated in 1896, had been in the US 4 years, and was working as a cotton screwman.

Cornelius also returned to New York from Queenstown on August 28, 1909. aboard the Campania. The manifest lists his age as 35, his occupation as a laborer, and his destination as 2602 Avenue D, Galveston, Texas. He was listed as a United State citizen with his last permanent residence in Galveston.

Here is an email I received from Peter O'Leary, a Senior Medical Specialist living in Dublin Ireland on March 31, 2011. [Peter O'Leary is the son of Tim O'Leary in Goleen, West Cork, and Kay O'Leary, nee Hayes, eldest daughter (2nd of 9 children) of Joe and Han Hayes (Whelton).]

Hello Hugh,

Here is an extract from my Grandfather's bio (He, Joe Hayes married Han Whelton in 1943) I thought might interest you.

THE WHELTON FAMILY

My knowledge of the Whelton family of Ballymacshoneen, Barryroe, the townland where they all originated from is scant I am afraid compared to my own family so I will not be able to cover them in detail except for Con who was Han's father. He had four brothers, Patsy, Michael, Dan and Johnny who was the youngest boy. They all emigrated to America except Johnny who remained at home. They had about ten acres of land at that time. Patsy, Michael and Dan, I presume went to Texas as I understand their Uncles, O'Regan's, their Mothers people were out there before them. Con the eldest certainly went to Texas to a place called Galveston which is on the gulf of Mexico which must be very near the equator line and certainly must have been a very warm place to work in. He apparently worked at loading cotton on boats (peace work) which must have been very hard work in such heat and like all the Wheltons, did not spend too many hours in bed as he must have made a substantial amount of money in a short time. I do not know how long he was over there. There were two girls, Julia who married Paddy McCarthy, a farmer in Ballymacredmond, Barryroe and Ciss who emigrated to Texas as well and later lived in San Francisco. She has a daughter a nun in the same order as Sr. Louise who is in contact with the family from time to time. Ciss was married twice I think. She came home to Ireland on one occasion when she visited here. She seemed to be a rather nice person.

Dan also came home sometime, we never met him, but he returned again to Texas as he found Ireland cold after all the heat he must have experienced in Texas. Con Whelton returned home around 1912 and bought the farm in Kilsillagh Most of the people who went to America at that time never came back again. For most of them, the Fastnet was the last glimpse they had of Ireland so Con Whelton must have been an exceptional man to be able to accumulate sufficient money at an early age to come back and buy a farm in his own part of the country where he left. Not alone that but he must have some money to spare, as he did not forget to see after his family in his will later. He married a girl from not too far away, Margaret O'Sullivan, also from Kilsillagh. Con was a founder member of Barryroe Co-op, which was established in 1925. He was also a substantial shareholder and a member of the first committee. There is a coincidence there for Joe and Han as Jamesie Hayes, Joe's father was also a shareholder and founder member of Barryroe Co-op and a member of the first Committee of Management. Con and Margaret had six children, Eileen, Han, Mary Theresa, Martha, John Michael and Con. Unfortunately, Mary Theresa died when about two and a half years old, probably from meningitis about which there was little known about at that time and many children from other families died at a young age in those years also including my own sister also called Teresa who died aged four. Han's Grandmother was an O'Regan who obviously married a Whelton man, both from the same townland, Ballymacshoneen. There are none of those O'Regans there now. I think some of them went to America so their descendants may still be there. Han's grandmother from her mother's side was a Hurley woman from the Cuckoo Hill area. Teddy O'Sullivan and his son John still live in that area. Con died as a baby but most unfortunate of all, their mother died when she was only 38 years of age from tuberculosis and their father Con senior died in 1927, cause of death unknown (I think there is a general belief it was probably cancer). Han's family must have had a very hard time to cope with all those shocking losses in such a short time only I suppose that Ellen Sullivan, Margaret's sister married Con some years after his first wife died and not a long time before he died himself. That must have helped to get them over the saddest period of their lives. Their first cousin, Madge Donovan (nee Whelton from Travarra) came to help them also after their Mother died. Ellen, known to them as Aunt Ell also had a baby born some time after the father died, to add to all their grief. That baby died also. T.G., Eileen, Han, Martha and John Michael survived and went to school in Butlerstown National School.

Eileen later married Dan Coleman, a farmer in Carrigeen where she still resides. They have one son, Chris who is now Chairman of Barryroe Co-op Ltd. (As you will see elsewhere, his grandfather, Con Whelton was a founder member) He is married to Nora Murphy and they have four children, Deirdre, Michael, Gerard and Brendan. They live in Carrigeen also. Han married a fellow called Joe Hayes. Martha joined the French Sisters of Charity in 1936 and is now in Dublin. John Michael married Nellie May O'Donovan from Lislee and they live in the homeplace in Kilsillagh. Unfortunately, Nellie May died in July, 1999 after a long illness.

It must have been very, very sad to see two fine people like Margaret Whelton nee O'Sullivan and Con Whelton die at such a young age leaving a very young family after them. Ar dheis Dé go raibh a h-anam.

Ellen Whelton (Nellie Kelly), who was born in Ireland in 1876, and died in Freeport Texas, on January 14, 1977. Ellen Whelton emigrated in 1896 from Clonakilty to Galveston at age 20. The Ellis Island web shows her original arrival in New York from Queenstown, on August 19, 1896, aboard the Majestic. She was listed as a servant; her destination was Galveston, and she was in the United States for a protracted sojourn. Traveling with her, and listed next to her on the ship's manifest, were two other 20 year old Irish girls, also listed as servants, whose destination was Galveston: Mary Kirby and Annie Sexton. Also on the manifest with destination as Galveston were Timy Sullivan, age 24, laborer, and Hannah Sullivan, age 30, servant. Ellen Whelton returned to Ireland and came back from Queenstown through New York on the Oceanic on October 24, 1900. This manifest lists her as a US resident for 4 years, who had returned to Clonakilty for a visit, whose address in Galveston was 2713 Post Office Street. With Ellen was her brother, Patrick Whelton, age 20, a laborer, whose last residence was Clonakilty, and whose destination was Galveston, and who was coming to the US for the first time to join his sister, Ellen, in Galveston. (See below.) Nellie Whelton married Martin Kelly. The 1920 census of Galveston lists Martin Kelly, on Avenue N 1/2, age 40, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1893, was naturalized in 1908, a produce merchant; his wife, Nellie (Whelton) Kelly, age 40, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1900, naturalized in 1908; and five children, all born in Texas: Mary E., age 14; Martin, Jr., age 13; John, age 12; Richard, age 8; and Agnes, age 6.

Noreen Whelton (Ciss, McPartland), born in Ireland, died in California in 1978. [Nora Whelton (no age given) of Timoleague, Ireland, arrived in New York aboard the Carmania from Liverpool on March 15, 1920, going to join her sister, "Mrs. M. Kelly, 1912 Half Street (sic, should be Avenue N1/2 ), Galveston Texas." Nora was 5'9" tall with fair complexion, fair hair, and blue eyes. The sister she was visiting was Ellen (Nellie) Whelton Kelly, married to Martin Kelly, see above.]

Patrick (Big Paddy) Whelton, who was born in Ireland on August 29, 1880, and died in Galveston on July 7, 1960. Ellis Island records show that Patrick Whelton, age 20, a laborer, arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the Oceanic on October 24, 1900. He was traveling with his sister, Ellen who was returning to her home at 2713 Post Office Street, Galveston, Texas.(see above). The 1910 census of Galveston shows Patrick Whelton, age 40 (probably should be 30), born in Ireland, living on Avenue M 1/2 (roll 1554, page 220), married 7 years, who emigrated in 1896 and was a naturalized citizen, working as a screwman on the docks; living with his wife, Catherine, age 30, who was born in Ireland and emigrated in 1898, mother of 3 children, all living; and their 3 children, all born in Texas: John P., age 6; Michael J., age 4; and Mary Francis (sic), age 2.

The 1920 census of Galveston (roll 1805, page 227) shows this family on 24th Street:

Patrick Whelton, age 37, emigrated in 1901, naturalized, born in Ireland, merchant, soft-drink store.

Katharine Whelton, age 37, emigrated in 1898, naturalized, born in Ireland.

John Whelton, age 16, born in Texas, clerk, soft drink store. [Born December 30, 1903, in Galveston; married Ellen Mabel Garner. See World Family Tree, volume 88, tree 662, for his children] World Family Tree, volume 88, tree 662. lists a John Patrick Whelton, born in Galveston, Texas, on December 30, 1903. He was the son of Patrick Whelton had his wife, Margaret ?) John Patrick married Ellen Mabel Garner, and they had these children: Katherine Maureen Whelton, who married Vincent Martin DiMarre, who was born in Galveston on August 27, 1933, and died in Las Vegas on April 4, 1993; Ellen Patricia Whelton; John Patrick Whelton, Jr.; and Robert Cornelius Whelton. In the 1930 census (roll 2334 page 220), John P. Whelton, age 22, proprietor of an auto repair shop, was married to Ellen, age 19, with 2 young children, Ellen and John, Jr.; the family was living on Avenue K.

Joseph Whelton, age 13, born in Texas. [Michael J. Whelton in 1910 census.]

Francis M. Whelton (daughter), age 11, born in Texas.

Emmett Whelton, age 8, born in Texas.

Helen Whelton, age 6, born in Texas.

Michael Whelton (brother in law), age 42, single, emigration information unknown, born in Ireland, police officer, city.

The 1930 census shows this family on 27th Street in Galveston (roll 2334, page 263):

Patrick Whelton, age 50, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898, manager garage.

Catherine Whelton, age 51, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898,

Joseph Whelton, age 24, born in Texas, collector, travel insurance,

Emmett Whelton, age 19, born in Texas, collector, auto garage.

Helen Whelton, age 16, born in Texas.

Francis Kemp (?) (daughter), age 21, born in Texas.

Michael Whelton (brother in law), age 54, single, born in Irish Free State, emigrated in 1898, naturalized, officer, police force.

Mary Whelton, born in Ireland in May of 1877; emigrated in 1895; married Patrick Sullivan in Galveston in 1899. [The 1900 census of Galveston (roll 1637, page 136) lists in the family of Pat Sullivan, age 30, born in 1870 in Ireland, emigrated in 1890, a naturalized citizen, a cotton jammer; his wife of one year, Mary Sullivan, age 23, born in May, 1877, in Ireland, who emigrated in 1895 and had been in the US 5 years; Pat Sullivan's brother-in-law, Con Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who emigrated in 1896 and had been in the US 4 years, a cotton screwman; and Pat Sullivan's cousin, Dennis Whelton, age 24, born in Ireland in December, 1875, who also emigrated in 1896, had been in the US 4 years, and was working as a cotton screwman.]

Michael Francis Whelton, born in Ballymacshoneen, Ireland, on November 1, 1886, died in Galveston on September 15, 1940. He emigrated through Ellis Island on the SS Baltic, which arrived from Queenstown on August 30, 1907. The ship's manifest lists him as a laborer, age 21, who was born in Ballymacshoneen, Timoleague, and says that his father was John Whelton and that he was going to join his cousin, Cornelius Whelton, at 23 West 52nd Street, New York City. He was described as 5'10" tall, fair complexion, brown hair, blue eyes. Traveling with him was Mary Whelton, age 21, born in Desert Clonakilty, who was an American citizen, who had lived two years in New York, and who was returning to America and was going to join her brother, Cornelius Whelton, at 23 West 52nd Street, New York City. The manifest lists her father as Daniel Whelton. She was 5'4" tall, with fair complexion, dark hair, and blue eyes. [The 1910 census of the 22nd Ward of New York City lists Cornelius Whelton, a widower, age 35, born in Ireland, who emigrated in 1895, a naturalized citizen, and who was a gas man in a garage. He had two daughters, both born in New York: Catherine, age 15, and Mary, age 12. A Cornelius Whelton was born in 1873 in Clonakilty to Daniel Whelton and Catherine McCarthy. Daniel Whelton, the father, was born in Clonakilty, in 1836; he and Catherine McCarthy had another son, Daniel Whelton, who was born on May 24, 1878, in Desert, Clonakilty.]

Michael married Nellie Mackerby on June 11, 1913. The 1920 census of Galveston lists Michael Whelton, age 34, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1907, naturalized in 1912, a screwman; with his wife, Nellie, age 28, born in Ireland, who also emigrated in 1907; and their two children, both born in Texas: Mary Ellen, age 5 (born March 22, 1914, married a man named Berndt, and died in Galveston on March 15, 1993); and John Patrick, age 1 year and 11 months (born on January 30, 1918). There was one more child, Gertrude, born in Galveston on August 2, 1921, and died there at age 81 in Turner Geriatric Center on February 15, 2002. After Michael's death in 1940, his widow, Nellie (Mackerby) Whelton was a frequent visitor to the home of my wife's parents.

Michael's son, John Patrick Whelton, Sr., was born in Galveston on January 30, 1918; married Adelia Marie Boddeker; and died in Galveston on February 23, 1997. Their son, John Patrick Whelton, Jr., was born in Galveston on September 19, 1944 (see Galveston Co. TX - Births, 1944), married Susan Reitzel, and now lives in Lamarque, Texas. He is the compiler of the family history that is much quoted on the page.

John Whelton, born in Ireland June 23, 1887; died in Ireland December 18, 1980.

Daniel Whelton, born in Ireland, died in Ireland in November of 1976.

Julie Whelton (McCarthy), born in Ireland, died in Ireland on July 17, 1965. (Julia married Paddy McCarthy, a farmer, in Ballymacredmond, Barryroe. county Cork, Ireland.)

Billy Whelton—West Cork Flying Squadron, June 21, 1921

Carolyn Winifred has created a website called Guerilla Days, which she calls a first draft of a "master script" for a stage play. According to the script, Billy Whelton was with the West Cork Flying Column, commanded by John Hales [Sean Hales], in an attack on Castle Bernard, 3 kilometers east of Bandon, early in the morning of June 21, 1921, in which 70-year old Lord Bandon is surprised in bed with a young lady not his wife, and taken prisoner. The castle was burned. [From Guerilla Days by C. Winifred—Act 10, To the Truce.] The first reference in the script I have found to Billy Whelton is act 8, the Rosscarbery Attack:

Scene 16.04 Other May 14th [1921] actions

(a) Commanders check time on watches and clock towers and churches 3 pm

(i) Billy Whelton out with Flying Column

Bily Whelton again appears in act 10, To the Truce:

Scene 20.03 Gloundaw Ambush position

(a) Barry rides over hill to see 80 men taking positions along road

(i) Glad to be home

(ii) Liam Deasy in charge, Tom Ward, Pete Kearney, Sean Lehane, Billy O'Sullivan with Lewis machine gun, Sam Kingston, Paddy O'Brien, Jim Hurley, Sean 'Buckshot' Hales, Jack Corkery, Denis Lordan, John Lordan, Neilus Connolly, Willie Hayes, Gibbs Ross, Billy Whelton. Barry rides up with Mick Crowley.

Act XXIII. Burnings

Scene 23.01 Harolds and Beasleys of Crossbarry burnt by IRA

(a) Barry and Tom Kelleher walk up to burnt out Kelleher farm after return from Gougane Barra. Families lived in lofts, cattle sheds, makeshift dwellings

(i) A bullet would be too good for him.

(ii) Kelleher comment about bombing Brits

(iii) Shortage of amm. Chronic and acute

(b) Colonel Peacock's home, Innishannon

(i) Run out of places to burn in Innishannon area

(c) Howes Strand Coastguard burnt

(i) Dr. Dorothy Stopford, newly arrived last week of May 1) Flaxfair, Wheltons, In bed, woken by rumble of engines

a) Oh, Major Percival, give it a rest.

b) Rolls over and tried to go to sleep again

2) Awoken to treat burns

a) No one gets sick in Kilbrittain.

b) Chap with bad petrol face burns

3) Raid on Flaxfair for Dr. D at least twice

a) 9 pm. Curfew 8 pm

b) Billy Whelton hiding two fields away

c) A child could have fooled them, still, one has to have respect for their multiple lethal weapons.

(d) Dunboy Castle, near Berehaven

(i) Newly built mansion in chateau style, burnt

(e) No reply by British to burnings ...

Scene 23.03 Castle Bernard park 4:30 am

(a) Sean 'Buckshot' Hales and Jim O'Mahony in command of eight Volunteers move in

(i) Scout informs them no British forces had been seen, but can't say they're not around

(ii) Sean 'Buckshot' Hales bravado decides lead his men right up to the building, enter by force if necessary and capture the Earl even if he has to fight his way in and out

(iii) Rest of party slightly anxious

(iv) Approach from Old Chapel side in extended formation at dawn

(v) Move up to Castle building proper

1) Six, Denis Lordan, cover back and front windows

a) Flank and rear

b) Billy Whelton with Flying Column

2) Three approach main door

a) Knock

In sources available to me, I could find no mention of a Billy or William Whelton of the right age to have been a member of Tom Barry's West Cork Flying Squadron in 1921. An email of June 7, 2005, on behalf of John C. Whelton of Las Vegas, Nevada, suggests that the Whelton referred to in the play was actually John Whelton, Sr.:

"John's father John Whelton, Sr. was with the Flying Column and according to John, he has never heard of a Billy Whelton being with them. John's dad served with Tom Barry, and John has many a story on his dad, etc."

The capture of the Earl of Bandon and the burning of Castle Bernard are historic events. Chronology of Irish History 1919–1923, pages 295–297, describes the event (citing Towards Ireland Free by Liam Deasy (Royal Carbery Books, Cork, 1973):

" June 22, 1921

"The Earl of Bandon is taken prisoner by the IRA (under Sean Hales, O/C Bandon Battalion) at his home, Castle Bernard. A letter is sent to O/C 6th Division, British Army in Cork (General Strickland) saying that he is being held hostage and would be executed if IRA prisoners were executed by the British. No more IRA prisoners are executed in the martial law areas."

The burning of Castle Bernard is reported by Tom Barry in his book: Guerilla Days in Ireland—A Firsthand Account of the Black and Tan War (1919–1921) (American Edition, Devin-Adair Company, New York, 1956), pages 285–287:

"As there were no other active Loyalist homes in that area, we went further afield to teach the British a lesson, and once and for all end their fire terror ...The Earl of Bandon's stately and massive home at Castle Bernard blazed for half a day before it crumbled in ruins. To those counter burnings the British did not reply; the evidently had had enough. ...

"Lord Bandon's castle, situated outside the western end of Bandon, was set on fire at 4:30 a.m., but.the British did not venture out to save it until four and a half hours later. ...

"Sean Hales and Kim O'Mahony were in charge of the party arresting Lord Bandon. ...

"Lord Bandon was held our prisoner until after the Truce became operative. ...When Lord Bandon was taken from his burning Castle, he was brought south of the Clogagh Company area where he was left with a guard which had been instructed to shoot him should the British appear likely to recapture him, and then to fight their own way clear. These instructions were given in Bandon's presence and he became a model prisoner, often advising his guard not to make so much noise as a British rounding up party might hear them."

Sean Hales was the commander of Section A of Tom Barry's West Cork Flying Column at Cross Barry on March 19, 1921. See: Tom Barry Leads West Cork Flying Column To Victory at Crossbarry—the greatest defeat of the British during the Irish War of Independence. Crossbarry (more often Cross Barry on modern maps). Cross Barry is about one third of the way from Bandon to the city of Cork; 6 miles northeast of Bandon, and 10 miles southwest of Cork.

"In 1918, it was decided to form Cork into three Brigades, on a territorial basis. The areas covered by the three Cork Brigades were:

"Cork No 3 Brigade area extended from Ballinhassig to the west and south- west. Battalions were centered at Bandon, Clonakilty, Dunmanway, Skibbereen, Bantry and Castletownbere." The Anglo-Irish War 1916–1923, County Cork

See Third West Cork Brigade on Cork Local History for a list of the men who died while on active service with this brigade.

"THE THIRD WEST CORK BRIGADE

We'll raise our voice in Irelands praise.
Glad are our hearts today
For her gallant sons have proved their worth
In the good old I.R.A..
All parts fought well for Roisin Dubh
But we have a record made
In good old Cork. In brave old Cork
In the 3rd West Cork Brigade.

At Clewcestown we struck a blow
For Ireland and Sinn Fein.
At Ballinhassig next we stood
Those nights we could maintain.
The British foe, we twice laid low
We fought them undismayed
In good old Cork. In Brave West Cork
In the fighting 3rd Brigade.

And at Crossbarry's battlefield
Our gallant boys fought well;
For ten to one the Saxon foe
Before our eyes they fell.
And o'er the hills we made our way
While our gallant pipers played
For good old Cork, for brave West Cork
For the 3rd West Cork Brigade.

References to Wheltons in County Cork

These are mostly random notes from the Internet that I hope of put into better order and coordinate with the rest of this page.

Irish Ancestors lists all the Wheltons counted in Griffith's Valuation as being in county Cork. Here is what it says about the surname Whelton:

"Quite numerous: mainly W Cork. Ir. Ó h-Uallacháin, uallach, proud. A variant of the more usual Houlihan, q.v."

The Francis Guy's County and City of Cork Directory for 1875–6, under Clonakilty at page 192, lists William Whelton of Dunowen as a principal landholder. (The directory also includes 15 Donovan families under Clonakilty.) Patrick Whelton and Mary Horrigan were the parents of John Whelton, born on December 18, 1865, at Timoleague, county Cork. John Whelton and Catherine Leahy were the parents of Margaret Whelton, born in Clonakilty on October 4, 1874. There is a John Whelton who is today listed as a carpenter/joiner of Balteenbrack, Ardfield, Clonakilty. [A family tree on the Wheeldon — Wheelton Family History Website shows a Catherine Whelton born to John Whelton and Catherine Duggan on September 9, 1874, at Clonakilty, Cork, Ireland. (Inclusion of this Whelton family assumes an improbable connection between the English Wheelton and the Irish Whelton.) On January 14, 2002, a Maurice Whelton of Garranecore North, Clonakilty, applied for permission to demolish outhouses and construct a two story extension to a dwelling house as Garranecore, Clonakilty. Cork County Council Planning Department. Maurice Whelton from the same place was a member of the IFA (Irish Farm Centre) National Potato Committee in 2003. He appears several times on 2001 the list of growers of the Irish Seed Potato Certification Scheme. This is probably the Maurice Whelton "who owns the family land" that Teel's brother, Maurice Patrick (Paddy) Whelton of Houston, met on a visit to Clonakilty in 1980. He also met Maurice's brother, "Paddy who is a truck farmer in the area and supplies many of the local restaurants with produce and vegetables." [There are several Irish Wheltons around Clonakilty today. A search engine will turn up several links to the combination of the search words Whelton and Clonakilty; the combination of Whelton and Cork will turn up more.]

Before 1900:

Here is part of another posting on June 19, 2002:

"I know almost nothing about the Wheltons in Ireland but would like to know more. All I know is that John Whelton (born 1817) married Ann Morris in Ireland and emigrated to Salem with their family. John's father was also named John Whelton (born 1787?) married to Ellen Regan. I assume both Johns had siblings. There is a family story about an 'Uncle Andrew,' but no other stories about the Wheltons in Ireland."

Mary Ellen (Whelton) Rossi maintains a website entitled The Whelton Family Tree on rootsweb that contains much history of the Wheltons who migrated from Clonakilty to Salem, Massachusetts. See also her page: Mary Ellen's Nuggets.

By email of December 21, 2004, she tells me:

"My Whelton branch is from the Clonakilty area, and I think, guessing from the Griffith's Index, that they might be from Knocknageehy—there is a great prevalence of 'John and David' in my family tree and this particular area had both a John and David Whelton.

"The original member of my branch of the Whelton tree came to the US in 1860. My own ggrandfather was left behind in Ireland and made his own way over to the US in 1880. Why he was left behind is one of the mysteries that got me interested in genealogy. Was he 'given away' to a family member, or adopted out, or sickly??? He would have been six years old when the rest of the family moved. I have been trying to find more information about the Whelton for several years and have several Whelton contacts, but none of whom seem to be from my branch of the family tree. ...

"I do have information about my ggggrandfather, John Whelton, who must have been born in the 1700s. My gggrandfather, John Whelton, emigrated to the U.S. and I have a copy of his death certificate. He was born in 1817 in 'Clonakilty' but this was a general area, not a specific township.

"I am curious about a possible connection and also have some information about other Whelton families— Clark Whelton can trace his ancestry back to a mayor of Boston, 'Daniel Whelton' and has a family story about an ancestor who was captured by the British during the Revolutionary War and sent back to Ireland. There are a number of Wheltons from the Clonakilty area; I have read that it was a variation of 'Houlihan.' Patrick is a name from another branch of my family tree, along with a whole bunch of Ellens . ..."

Mary Ellen (Whelton) Rossi posted this note on the Internet on January 10, 2001::

"I'm a Whelton. Ancestry, Clonakilty, immigrated to Salem Mass in the 1800's. George, born 1828, son Bartholomew born 1854, son John Michael born 1883."

Here is a posting by her on June 29, 2001:

"Searching for descendants of Salem, MA Wheltons. My ggrandfather was Bartholomew, born in 1854 in Ireland."

Denis Driscoll and Mary Whelton were the parents of Denis Driscoll born on May 10, 1873, at Rosscarbery, county Cork.

John Driscoll and Kate Whelton were the parents of Mary Driscoll, born on September 13, 1789, in Clonakilty.

Francis Guy's Directory of Cork 1875–1876, under Clonakilty, lists: William Whelton, Dunowen.

Clergy may send requests for records of baptisms, marriages, deaths, and the like, in the files of the Church of Our Lady, Star of the Sea , Lislevane (1869) (Parish Church), and Sacred Heart Church , Courtmacsherry (1855), both in Barryroe, to Dan Whelton, Currimevern, Lislevane, Bandon, county Cork.

William Whelton was the owner and trainer of Greyhounds raced in county Cork in 2000. Irish Greyhound Association. In 2003–2005, he raced Nancy's Rebel. Other dogs were Nancy's Choice, Nancy's Boss, and Nancy's Trade.See also Appendix 3 to Michael Collins—His Life and Times by Edward O'Mahony.

Griffith's Valuation of 1850–1853 shows that Patrick Brien, James Whelton, John Driscoll, jointly rented property from Reps. Thos. Dea\cy, Esq. in Cruary, West Templeomalus.

Whelton & Carty-Duggan births in LDS GB disk:

255816 Whelton, Patrick b 3-2-1871 in Clonakilty to John Whelton & Mary Carthy

255824 Whelton, Honora b 6-4-1871 in Clonakilty to John Whelton & Margaret Duggan

101144 (probably) Whelton, Mary b 5-6-1867 in Clonakilty to John Whelton & Margaret Duggan

101144 Whelton, Patrick b 1-19-1867 in Clonakilty to Batt Whelton & Johanna Hurley

101189 Whelton, Matthew b 4-15-1869 in Clonakilty to Batt Whelton & Johanna Hurley

101149 Whelton, Johanna b 5-26-1867 in Clonakilty to James Whelton & Mary Hurley

101199 Whelton, John b 11-28-1869 in Clonakilty to John Whelton & Mary Hurly

1900 and later:

Paul K. Whelton is Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine; and Senior Vice President for Health Sciences, Tulane University Health Sciences Center. He received an MD degree in 2003 from the National University of Ireland (advanced degree for research in epidemiology and prevention); and a Master of Science in 1981 from the University of London, School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. An internationally recognized epidemiologist, Dr. Whelton was born and raised in county Cork, Ireland. See: TUHSC 170th Anniversary Web Site and Asia-Pacific Consortium for Public Health Presents the 1998 Professor Kazue K. McLaren Leadership Achievement Award to Dr. Paul K. Whelton. See also: Curriculum Vitae Paul Kieran Whelton (PDF)..

A Daniel Whelton of 85 South Main Street, Bandon, county Cork, was appointed a Peace Commissioner in Ireland on February 27, 1974.

The Companies in Forest Service, Wood packaging, etc., registered with the National Standards Authority of Ireland, includes Aidan Whelton, "carpentrary," Camus Ardfield, Clonakilty, county Cork.

The Irish Minister of Agriculture created a list of South-West Cork Estates on April 26, 1978, which included 6 acres of a Whelton estate at Butlerstown, 5 miles south of Timoleague, with date of possession of December 20, 1973.

Frank Whelton, 119 Patrick Street, Cork, is on the list of Dentists published by the Department of Social and Family Affairs of Ireland.

John Whelton is listed as a carpenter/joiner on House-Ireland.com: "John Whelton - Balteenbrack, Ardfield (023/40831)"

The Electrical Contractors Safety & Standards Association Ltd lists as a member: Denis Whelton, Lehina, Lislevane, Bandon.

Sinead Whelton is the marketing manager, and mails out bulletins in the name of, the Sustainable Ireland Renewal Energy Information Office located at Shinagh House, Bandon, county Cork. Here is an email I received on March 27, 2007, from Sinead Whelton:

"Dear Hugh

"A recent bit of research on the internet brought me to your website, which I
found so interesting and extremely well researched! I even found my own name
on it!!

"Well I am not sure exactly where my branch of the Wheltons lists with yours,
but there is a little milestone coming up this week I thought you might like
to know. My husband is Raymond, son of Mathew Whelton, son of John and Kitty
Whelton of Camus Ardfield/Rathbarry. Kitty celebrates her 101st Birthday
this April 6th. Her husband John Whelton would be either the same John
Whelton or son of John Whelton listed on your page as a land owner in
Dunowen.

"I don’t know if the Ardfield branch of Wheltons matches up with the Wheltons
of Timoleague and Desert, but I just thought you would like to know. Kitty
is an exceptional woman having experienced so much in her life. As the
oldest Whelton around I thought it might deserve a little note!
Well done on all the research!

"Kind Regards
Sinéad"

Lisa Whelton is head administrator of West Cork Leader Cooperative Society Limited. "A native of Boston, MA, U.S.A., Lisa has been working with West Cork Leader Co-op since 1998. After graduating with an Associates Degree of Science from Massachusetts Bay College, she had spent most of her time teaching primary students before becoming a compensation and benefits analyst. Her role involves all aspects of administering the West Cork Leader Co-op Society Ltd. and Fuchsia Brands Ltd."

Within a mile radius of Butlerstown House (southeast of Timoleague) there are two shops: Whelton's Food Market, Barryroe—general store and video hire. Out of the drive and turn left and drive 4 minutes to the big Catholic Church on your right and immediately in front of you is Whelton's. This is a mini supermarket run by the Whelton Family. A good stock of food and perishables, Sunday papers can be collected outside the shop at 9am. It also stocks a good range of rental videos.

Con Whelton and J. Whelton, both of Ballymacshoneen, near Butlerstown, are listed as landowners in Lislee parish, Timoleague in 1914. Guy's Postal Directory, 1914, Butlerstown, Timoleague.

Patrick Whelton, Garrancore, is listed as landowner in the parish of Ross, electoral division of Coolcraheen, in 1914. John (Tohn?) Whelton, Kilacoosane, is listed as a landholder in Kilfaughnabeg parish in 1914. Guy's Postal Directory, 1914, Glandore and Guy's Postal Directory, 1914, Rosscarbery.

County Cork Pubs & Bars lists Michael Whelton as the proprietor of McSweeneys at Lislevane.

Patrick Whelton, Barreragh, is listed as a landholder in Lislee parish, electoral division Courtmacsherry, county Cork in 1914. Guy's Postal Directory, 1914, Courtmacsherry.

B&B Subscriber List County Cork lists "C103: Eileen Whelton, "Castle Island View", Schull: Telephone: +353 (0) 28 28102 Fax: +353 (0) 28 28672 Mobile: 086 8510183 E-mail: eileenwhelton@hotmail.com."

The Southern Star newspaper of County Cork of January 20, 2005, says:

"Courtmacshery Notes—The Carbery senior football team who won the county final of 2004, have just returned from a holiday in the Grand Canary. Included in the party were Denzy Whelton and Bernard O’Brien of Barryroe. Denzy who is deputy manager of the team tells us that the holiday was greatly relished by the squad and having helped to recharge the batteries, they should be well focused to ..."

The Southern Star of March 15, 1901, reports:

"Castlehaven GAA—A very large crowd attended at the GAA Pavilion in Moneyvolihane on Friday night last to pray for and offer Mass for our late Secretary, Michael Whelton, and to remember also all deceased members of the club."

Hanora (Ahern) Whelton —obituary: "Whelton (Harbour View, Kilbrittain): On January 7, 2004, suddenly, at her residence, Hanora (Noreen) (nee Ahern), beloved wife of the late Denis and fond mother of Mairead, Michael, Sheila and the late Diarmuid. Deeply mourned by her family, sister Maud, daughter-in-law Catherine, sons-in-law Donal and Pat, grandchildren Laura, Fiona, Gary, Denis and Gerard, nephews, niece, kind neighbours and friends. RIP. Lying in repose at Gabriel and O'Donovan's Funeral Home, Bandon. Removal on this (Thursday) evening at 7pm to St Patrick's Church, Kilbrittain. Requiem Mass on tomorrow (Friday) at 12 noon. Funeral afterwards to the adjoining cemetery."

Cork County Planning Applications: Daniel Whelton, September 7, 2004, dwelling house, Lislevane West, Bandon, county Cork; March 22, 2004, Joseph Whelton of Ballintemple, Clonakilty, regarding a dwelling house at Knockarudane, Skibbereen, county Cork; November 22, 2004, Carmel Whelton of Charlestown, Massachusetts, applied for a permit to demolish a dwelling house and construct a dwelling house and garage at Kilkeran, Castlefreke, Clonakilty.

Imelda Whelton is on the teaching staff of Colaiste na Toirbhirte, Bandon, a College under the trusteeship of the Presentation Sisters, providing 2nd level education for girls.

Road Hazard Progress Report: "Name: Barry Whelton. Hazard Location: Kilumney Village, Cork. Date: 10 Jan 03. Hazard Nature: Severe potholes, raised manholes, sunken road at various levels. ... Other Information: These hazards start in Kilumney village Cork, and continue for a about 2-3 miles towards Bishopstown."

Hunter Pony Young Stock, Clonaslee Show - Sunday 5th September 2004: "3rd. Joe Whelton, Lisavaird, county Cork Qualified at Barryroe, by Harlaw Luck Strike out of Coosheen Thundercloud."

Index of Irish Death Notices "O": "O'Connor, Kitty (Whelton); Bandon COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2000-12-1; dja"; "O'Donovan , Sheila (Whelton); Rushbrooke Cobh COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2001-6-22; dja."

Marriage index 1908 3rd quarter: "1908 101261 Whelton, Margaret Mary, Clonakilty V5-31 3 qtr" The index includes several Donovans, including an Ellen Donovan. See: IRL-CORK-L Archives: October 2004.

Index of Irish Death Notices "W" (TIARA) :

Whelton, Daniel; ; Dunmanway COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2001-10-4; dja
Whelton, Daniel; ; Dunmanway COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2001-10-6; dja
Whelton, Hanora "Noreen" (AHERN); ; Kilbrittain COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2004-1-8; dja
Whelton, Helena Mary "Eily" (MURPHY); ; Waterfall COR IRL; Evening Echo; 2002-8-1; dja
Whelton, Jeremiah; 3; Ballinhassig COR IRL; Cork Examiner; 1896-2-29; dja
Whelton, Johney; ; London LND ENG; Irish Examiner (COR IRL); 2001-3-3; dja
Whelton, Kathleen Margaret Miss; ; Leap COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2001-10-22; dja
Whelton, Margaret; ; Courtmacsherry COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2001-4-16; dja
Whelton, Mary Scholastica Sister; 54; Cork City COR IRL; Cork Examiner; 1919-10-8; dja
Whelton, Michael "Mike"; ; Leap COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2000-12-1; dja
Whelton, Patrick; ; Sunday's Well Cork COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2002-2-14; dja
Whelton, Philomena (McCARTHY); ; Leap COR IRL; Irish Examiner; 2002-1-29; dja

William and Maura Whelton were given a permit for the erection of a dwellinghouse and associated site works at Currahevern East, Lislevane, Bandon, under County Cork, Local Government (Planning and Development Acts) 1963 to 1999) in 2002.

Top 200 Holstein Friesian Cows in Ireland Ranked on EBI. November 2004: Owner, Michael Whelton, Baureragh, Courtmacsherry, county Cork; number 150, cow name Whelfarm MFX Mary.

Clonakilty G.A.A. News, January 2005: Andrew Welton is listed in category 3 of the Clonakilty GAA Golf Outing to Dunmore G.C.

Carbery Junior A Hurling Championship Semi Final 1981: At Timoleague 30th August—the Barryroe team included Batt Whelton.

Daniel A. Whelton, Mayor of Boston, 1905

Daniel A. Whelton (1872–1953), the son of Irish famine immigrants, became mayor of Boston in 1905, just before the first term of John Francis Fitzgerald. Here is an excerpt from a talk on October 10, 1996, by Rudy Giuliani, then mayor of New York City, to the Kennedy School of Government, in Cambridge, Massachusetts:

"A member of my staff, Clark Whelton, has special reason to be grateful to Boston's historic role as a haven for new Americans. In 1848, his great-grandparents escaped the potato famine in Ireland and found new homes in Boston. Although they worked hard, they never had much money. But their only son, Daniel A. Whelton, became Mayor of Boston in 1905." Archives of Rudolph W. Giuliani— Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, MA—Thursday, October 10, 1996.

Here is a quote from: Boston, 1822 to 1922: the story of its government and principal activities during one hundred years, by John Koren (City of Boston Print. Dept., 1923, 289 pages). page 58:

"On the death of Mayor [Patrick Andrew] Collins, September 14, 1905, Daniel A. Whelton, chairman of the Board of Aldermen, became Acting Mayor, serving until January 1, 1906."

The same book, at page 288, lists the place and date of birth of Daniel A. Whelton as Boston, January 21, 1872.

Here is part of an email of February 11, 2006, from Clark Whelton:

"My name is Clark Whelton, grandson of Mayor Daniel Aloysius Whelton of Boston. It was me who wrote that speech for Mayor Giuliani. I was very glad to have the opportunity to remember my grandfather's Irish heritage and his service to his city and nation.

"My great-grandfather, Daniel Whelton, son of Daniel Whelton and Catherine Sullivan, was born on March 9, 1830 in Knockscagh, West Cork, which is located on the road between Clonakilty and Balineen. There is a school in Knockscagh today, and one of our Whelton cousins farms land there.

"I'm not sure when my great-grandfather left Ireland for America, but he served as a soldier in the U.S. Civil War and married my great-grandmother, Anna Gorey, also born in West Cork, about 1839, in Charlestown, Massachusetts on May 6, 1865.

"My grandfather, Daniel A. Whelton, was born in Boston on January 21, 1872. His father (a boot maker who specialized in leather goods for military officers) died of tuberculosis when the lad was five years old, and his mother went to work as a pastry cook for the admiral of the Charlestown Navy Yard. Young Daniel attended school until he was 14, then left to take a job in a bookselling company. He was a handsome boy, and well spoken, and had a way of making friends easily. He became an associate of Martin Lomasney, a powerful political leader in my grandfather's neighborhood. Martin saw potential in young Whelton and encouraged him to follow a career in public service, which he did. He was elected to the Board of Aldermen and, because he received more votes than other members of the Board, was serving as the Board's chairman when Mayor Patrick Collins died. Daniel A. Whelton succeeded him in City Hall, the first native-born Irish American mayor of Boston.

"Here is what I know about my family tree. My 3rd great-grandfather, Richard Whelton, was born in West Cork about 1780. His son, Daniel Whelton, married Catherine Sullivan on March 2, 1824 in Clonakilty parish. They had three sons that I know of, Richard, James and Daniel. It was Daniel who left Ireland for Boston and who became father of Mayor Whelton.

"About ten years ago, Michael Joe Whelton, who ran the Whelton pub in Lislevane, between Timoleague and Butlerstown, told me that his family also traces its ancestry back to Richard Whelton. Michael Joe and I were one month apart in age, and I think were 3rd cousins. Michael Joe was a wonderful man, and his death some years ago came as a terrible shock when I arrived in Lislevane to visit him, not knowing he had passed away two weeks earlier.

"Mayor Daniel A. Whelton married Ellen Frances Catherine Caffrey, and had six children."

Galveston—Great Storm of 1900; Yellow Fever

Patrick J. Whelton, brother of my father-in-law, had moved to Galveston well before the Great Storm of 1900.

"#1 When was the Great Storm?

"The 1900 Storm struck Galveston on Saturday, September 8, 1900. The morning began with high tides and scattered rain. By early afternoon, water from the Gulf of Mexico flooded the southern and eastern streets. Wind speed increased, becoming severe by 4:30 p.m. By nightfall, the island was completely flooded and winds reached in excess of 80 mph. The wind gauge at the Weather Bureau office blew away after recording winds of approximately 100 mph." Frequently Asked Questions about the 1900 Galveston Storm (Rosenberg Library)

"#4 What was the population of Galveston in 1900?

"The 1900 Federal Census, taken in June 1900, records the total population of the city of Galveston as 37,789. This number is disputed by the Galveston city directory of 1901-02, which claims that because the census was taken in June, many business men and their families were out of town on vacation.

"The Galveston city directory of 1901-02 then claims that by its records the population in 1900 was 42,210."

Before the Great Storm, Galveston had been periodically plagued with yellow fever.

Yellow fever plagued area during 1860s by W. T. Block (reprinted from Beaumont Enterprise, Saturday August 7, 1999).

"In 1863 the cry that "the yellow jack is coming" was as fearful to hear as "the Yankees are coming." In 1853 the bodies of yellow fever victims at Galveston and New Orleans multiplied faster than they could be buried. In 1867, 1,100 persons died of yellow fever in Galveston County, and 1,900 more in Harris County."

Yellow Fever and the Civil War

"Two particularly tragic targets of yellow fever were New Orleans and Galveston. According to Galveston College historian, Heather Green Campbell, "The most devastating yellow fever epidemic in New Orleans occurred in the summer of 1853, resulting in a final death count of approximately 9,000 persons. "Fourteen years later, Galveston suffered its 'Year of Crucifixion' when,in 1867, the grave closed over more than 1,150 souls," she says. Each city lost nearly 10 percent of its population.

"The Name and Family of Welton"—of the counties of Lincoln, Northampton, York, England

The surname Whelton in west county Cork is generally regarded as a variant of Houlihan. Ancestry.com says: "Whelton—Irish (west Cork): because of the earlier Anglicized form Houlton, MacLysaght suggests this may be a variant form of Houlihan." "Houlihan—Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hUallacháin ‘descendant of Uallachán’, a personal name from a diminutive of úallach ‘proud’, ‘arrogant’." This source says that Whelton is sometimes a spelling variant of "Welton—English: habitational name from any of various places named Welton, for example in Cumbria, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, and East Yorkshire, from Old English well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’."

As the above section of this page, Griffith's Valuation—County Cork—Whelton, Welton, shows, there were a good number of Weltons among the Wheltons in west Cork in the mid-1800s. The Weltons in west cork at this time were almost certainly of Irish origin rather than English origin.

There are ancient English families of Weltons, however, found, among other places in the parish of Welton in East Riding. See: The Ancient Parish of Welton and Welton: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1829, on GENUKI. Welton is located in the wapentake of Howdenshire in East Riding (4 miles SE. of South Cave, and 10 miles S. (southwest) of Beverley), a little less that 25 miles southeast of the City of York, on the River Humber, about 8 miles west of Hull (Kingston Upon Hull). See also: Places within 5 miles of Welton, OS Gridref SE959274. Here is a description of Yorkshire on GENUKI. Here is a good modern road map of Yorkshire, showing the adjoining towns of Whelton and Melton at the bottom right, and their relationship to South Cave, Beverly, and Hull. For a good website on the general area, see The Humber Estuary. See also: Hull, East Yorkshire and the Humber on North East England History Pages.

MapQuest lists three other towns in England by the name of Welton, and describes this town on the north side of the Humber River in East Riding, Yorkshire, as Welton, England, North Humberside, GB. The other three are: Welton, England, Cumbria, GB; and Welton, England, Lincolnshire, GB; and Welton, England, Northamptonshire, GB. See: Welton, Near Dalston, Carlisle, Cumbria - The Lake District.

The following information is from a cached website on Google by John S. Welton, MD, of Carmel, CA 93921 (© 1998 Dobiemad Internet Solutions). The article names many generations of this Welton family.

"The name of Welton is derived from the residence of its first bearers, at a place so called, there being parishes of that name in the counties of Lincoln, Northampton and York in England. Its original meaning was probably 'The Well Town or the Town by the Well.' It is found on ancient English and early American records in the form of Welltone, Weltone, Welltan, Wentan, Whelton, Welton and others, the latter being the spelling most generally accepted in America today, while Weltin variant is also occasionally found. Families bearing the name were living at early dates, not only in the counties of Lincoln, Northampton, and York, but also in the English counties of Bedford, Oxford, Suffolk, and Northumberland as well as in the city and vicinity of London. These families were for the most part of landed gentry and yeomanry of Great Britain. Some branches of the family, at least, trace their descent from one Alan or Allelm, son of Rory, who was Lord of Whelton and Staverton in Northampton in the time of William the Conqueror, between 1066 and 1080. Alan, or Allelm was the father of a son named Adam de Welton, who was the father of a son named William Stephen De Welton, son of the last named William gave the church of Staverton to Daventry Priory in 1161. By his wife Agnes, Stephen had a son named William who was the father of Roger and Eustachius (Eustce) de Welton, both of whom left numerous issues, although, the records of the latter are not at hand. ...

"Later representatives of these branches of the family in America have scattered to all parts of the United States and have contributed, as much to the advancement of the Nation as did their Progenitors in its founding. Known as a whole as a race of progressive, intelligent people, the Weltons have been prominent chiefly in the fields of education, literature and the sciences. Among those of the name who fought in the Revolution War were Daniel, James, Ensign Thomas and Lieutenant Job Welton of Virginia; Benjamin, Joel, Shubal, Stephan Jr., and Solomon Welton of Conn. and numerous others from various other states of that period. George, Daniel, Richard, Thomas, Benjamin, Stephan, Eliakim, Ebeneser, John, Roger, James, and William are some of the Christian names preferred by the family for the male progeny. A few of the members of the family who have distinguished themselves in various parts of the world in recent times are Daniel Morse Welton (1831-1904) American editor and translator; Thomas Abercrombie Welton (1835-1918) English Historian and author James Welton (1854 -) English Psychologist, author, and educator Richard Welton (later 19th early 20th century of Colorado, American musician and author Thurston Scott Welton (early 20th century) American educator, chemist and author."

Links

Clonakilty Town Council welcomes you to Clonakilty.ie

The Whelton Family Tree (This is the part of the Whelton family that moved from Clonakilty to Salem, Massachusetts)

Whelton Family Genealogy Forum on Genealogy.com

Mary Ellen's Nuggets

Fáilte Romhat John Hayes' excellent website contains his research into the Hayes family of west Cork and much more, including general directories with references to Wheltons. The site, for example, includes extracts from Guy's Postal Directory 1914 for County Cork Ireland and Francis Guy's Directory of Cork 1875–1876; and a detailed map of the Clonakilty Area.

Roman Catholic Parish of Ardfield & Rathbarry —Driscoll Baptism Sponsors, 1808–1876, contains many references to Wheltons.

Galveston, Texas—Genealogical and Historical Research

The Galveston Storm of 1900 (NOAA)

1900 Galveston Storm (Rosenberg Library Galveston/Texas History Center)

Galveston: The Great Storm of 1900.

The 1900 Storm—Galveston Island, Texas

1900 Galveston Storm—Recorded Deaths (This master list of 5,132 people includes no Whelton.)

Galveston County, Texas, on RootsWeb (many links to genealogical sources)

The Texas City Disaster in 1947 brought me to Galveston in 1956 where I met and married Teel (Matilda) Kilroy Whelton. Here are a few links to web pages on the Texas City Disaster.

The Texas City Disaster—April 16, 1947

Texas City, Texas, Disaster—April 16, 17, 1947 (Report by Report by Fire Prevention and Engineering Bureau of Texas and The National Board of Underwriters)

The Texas City Disaster—April 16 and 17, 1947

Murder in Peabody (Ellen Whelton Crowley is strangled by her husband Patrick on Memorial Day in 1886 in their home in Peabody, Essex Co., Massachusetts, leaving their four children to be taken care of by relatives.)

Robin's Egg (Some Whelton family history has been promised.)

Other Whelton Families on the Brett Family Bulletin Board.

A Brief History of Irish Texans by David O'Keefe of Houston, Texas, has a chapter on Irish Texans in Galveston, which mention an Irish mayor of the early 1870s, Charles W. Hurley. [Charles W. Hurley married Susan Rossell in Harris county, Texas, on January 1, 1857, according to the Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837–1977. The 1870 census of Galveston lists C. W. Hurley, age 34, born in New York, a commercial merchant of some wealth (with $20,900 in real estate, $20,000 in personal property, and 2 house servants), with his wife, Susan, age 33, born in Illinois, and three children, the oldest of whom (Linda) was 9. The 1880 census of Galveston lists Hurley and his wife Susan with five children, including a son, Charles W. Hurley, born in Texas in 1871. The father's age is listed as 43; his birth place is shown as New York; and both his parents are listed as born in England; his occupation is listed as "merchant." In he 1900 census, his widow, Sue Hurley, is listed on Hadley Avenue in the 3rd ward of Houston, with three of her children, a daughter in law, and a granddaughter. She is listed as 62, born in Illinois in April 1838, the mother of seven children, five of whom are living.] Charles W. Hurley was mayor of Galveston in 1873 and 1874. Hurley was the owner and builder of the Galveston, Pecos (or Brazos?) and Colorado Narrow Gauge Railroad. See the article on the Galveston, Brazos and Colorado Railway in the Handbook of Texas Online. He was a stockholder and director of the Gulf, Colorado and Sata Fe Railway Company in 1877 and 1878. Hurley's home at 1328 Ball, built in Galveston in 1868, is considered to be an excellent example of Greek Revival architecture, and is on a Riding and Walking Tour of The East End Historical District of Galveston.


Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy; Wheltons of County Cork and Galveston, Texas
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Updated April 7, 2012  
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