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The Kilroy Connection


My wife's mother was Anne (Nancy) Kilroy, who was born in Newport, county Mayo, Ireland, on February 3, 1900. My wife's grandmother was Matilda (Tillie) Kilroy of Newport, after whom my wife, Teel (Matilda), is named. She has several Kilroy relatives in Chicago. In looking into the McGough family history, I found other connections between Kilroys and McGoughs— including a marriage between Patrick Kilroy and Grace McGeough in Chicago—and stories in Connaught, involving Kilroys and a McGeough, of the Black-and-Tan war and the Irish Civil War that followed.

On this page is information on my wife's Kilroy ancestors and relatives. On a separate page, I have collected similar information on the family of my wife's father, Patrick Whelton, of Clonakilty, county Cork, Ireland. See: Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy; Wheltons of County Cork and Galveston, Texas.

But first, I give a little history of the Grace McGeough who married Patrick Kilroy at the Chapel of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Chicago on May 27, 1947.

 Table of Contents 

 

Francis McGeough of Drumbeo, Ontario, and Iowa

The Tithe Applotment Books show Francis McGeough (#322) in 1830 as living with his widowed mother Bridget (#320), and brother Bryan (in America, Bernard) (#321), in the townland of Drumbeo, parish of Clontibret, county Monaghan, Ireland. (The numbers refer to lines in my table McGoughs, McGeoughs, and McGeoghs in Ireland in the 1820–30s and 1850–60s: By County, Parish, and Townland.)

In 1833, when he was 8 years old, Francis McGeough moved to Ontario, Canada, with his mother, Bridget McGeough, his brother Bernard (Barney, Bryan), who was 24, Bernard's wife, Catherine Hernehan, and their baby daughter, Bridget. In 1852, Francis McGough and his brother Bernard McGough moved their families from Lindsay, Ontario, to Winnebago county, Illinois. In 1855, Bernard moved his family from Winnebago county up (and across) the Mississippi River to Allamakee county, Iowa. Bernard's brother Francis followed in 1856. The story of this family is told in McGeough: The Story of an Irish Family by Phyllis McGeough Devereux (1992). A short summary of the history of this family, much of it extracted from the Devereux book, is found on this website at Bernard McGough and Catherine Kernaghan of Lindsay, Ontario, and Allamakee County, Iowa.

Francis McGeough (1825–1910) married Bridget Murphy, who was born in Canada. The youngest of Francis and Bridget Murphy McGeough's nine children was Robert McGeough, born in Iowa in 1876. Robert married Agatha Gavin (1877–1952). One of their daughters was Grace McGeough. In 1992, the year the Devereux book was published, Grace McGeough was living in Chicago with her husband, Patrick Kilroy Sr. who is described in the family tree as an "Irish cop." Patrick and Grace were probably married at the Chapel of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Chicago on May 27, 1947. Their son, Pat Kilroy Jr., lived in Evanston, Illinois. Regina, the wife of Pat Kilroy Jr. has furnished some of the information on her family that is set out below.

 

Maps and Sources

Clew Bay to Cleveland by Bernie McCafferty is a superior website that includes townland maps of Western Mayo and Clew Bay, transcriptions of gravestones at Burrishoole Abbey, and a nice collection of photgraphs from western Mayo.

For a detailed map of county Mayo, go to County Map of Mayo. A similar map is on Pat Deese's website, along with several links to Mayo research sources. Both the civil parishes and the Roman Catholic parishes are available on the County Mayo Beginnings website. Irishroots has published a map of county Mayo that will bring up information about the town of Newport if you click on it. The East Mayo website has published a map showing the major towns of Mayo. Here is a map of the civil parishes of county Mayo which is available on ConnorsGenealogy. Wikipedia contains a map of the baronies of county Mayo, as does County Mayo Beginnings. Here is another map of the baronies of county Mayo.

Another valuable source of information on county Mayo is the Heaphy-Holly-Keane-Mulchrone Family Page 1795–1915.

See also: Newport History—Historical articles on Newport for several articles on the history and topography of Newport.

Roger McDonnell has published a word-searchable data base that includes the entire 1901 census of county Mayo. See: The Leitrim-Roscommon 1901 Census Search Page. The search engine allows a search for either a head of household or others enumerated in the household. (Although Mayo is not in the title, the complete census is there.)

Here is a Mayo web page that lists many research sources. See also County Mayo Maps & Facts, which is part of the IrelandGenWeb Project.

 

Stephen McGough and the Black and Tans in County Mayo

When the Black and Tans arrived in county Mayo in the early 1920s, they made life difficult for the native Irish. Among the troubles reported in The War of Independence and Civil War in Newport, by Willie Sammon, was this:

"The arrival of the Black and Tans made life very difficult for the people and a Black and Tan District Inspector named Fudge, stationed in Newport, went around with a group of Tans and terrorised the countryside. He usually operated at night and scarcely a village escaped his raids. Many houses in Glenhest were wrecked by his gang and in Cuilmore, Owen Keane, Tom Lyons and Stephen McGough were very badly beaten and had their homes wrecked. An ambush was prepared at Kilbride to kill him one night, but it failed. During the early summer 1921 many ambush positions were held but the enemy never obliged." A larger part of this article is set out below.)

The ambush positions were under the command of General Michael Kilroy, my wife's uncle. Cuilmore is a townland about 1.8 miles southeast of Newport, on the southeastern border of Burrishoole parish. See 1832 Tithe Applotment Book for Burrishoole Parish and the map of the townlands of Burrishoole parish (townland #122). (There is another Cuilmore at Swinford, which is about 20 kilometers east by northeast of Castlebar on the N5. It is also east by southeast of Foxford, and not far from the Knock airport. There is today a concentration of McGoughs in the Castlebar-Foxford area.)

 

General Michael Kilroy

Michael Kilroy (September 14, 1884 - December 22, 1862) was the brother of my wife's mother, Anne (Nancy or Nan) Kilroy of Newport, county Mayo, Ireland. He became a general in the Irish volunteers in the Irish revolution of 1920 through 1922. He was the officer in charge of the 4th Western Division of the old IRA He was elected to Dáil Éireann for the constituency of Mayo South in the general election of August 27, 1923. (See Lecarrow by Bryan McHugh.) Eamon de Valera attended his funeral in Newport.

For a good short biography and references, see the article on Michael Kilroy on Wikipedia. A booklet on the life of Michael Kilroy was published in 2008, Michael Kilroy - A Life 1884–1962 and is available in Mayo County Libraries.

Here are some more excerpts from The War of Independence and Civil War in Newport by Willie Sammon. This is only a small part of an article that is well worth reading.

"The Irish Volunteers founded in Dublin in 1913, soon spread to most parts of the country. They were welcomed in Newport, as the old Fenian tradition was very much alive, and the I.R.B. was still very active. Michael Kilroy is on record as saying that the 1916 leader, Sean McDermott, once told him 'that Newport-Tiernaur, Kilmeena, and a parish in Tipperary, were the best organised I.R.B. centres in Ireland in the early part of the century'. 1916 came and plans were in place for Connaught to play a big part, as the arms from the German arms ship the Aud were to be siphoned through Limerick to the West. The Aud was lost and the cancellation of manoeuvres caused Connaught to take no part, except Galway under Liam Mellowes. The reorganisation of the Volunteers started in 1917 and now their aim was to carry on the fight started in 1916. The companies were formed into Battle Battalions and Battalions into Brigades. Newport, Westport, Louisburgh and Castlebar formed the West Mayo Brigade. Michael Kilroy was appointed O.C. and Ned Lyons replaced Michael Kilroy as O.C. Newport. When he was arrested in October 1920, Josie Doherty replaced him.

"The arrival of the Black and Tans made life very difficult for the people and a Black and Tan District Inspector named Fudge, stationed in Newport, went around with a group of Tans and terrorised the countryside. He usually operated at night and scarcely a village escaped his raids. Many houses in Glenhest were wrecked by his gang and in Cuilmore, Owen Keane, Tom Lyons and Stephen McGough were very badly beaten and had their homes wrecked. An ambush was prepared at Kilbride to kill him one night, but it failed. . . .

"Kilroy, now a General and OC of the 4th Western Division, took over the Castlebar Barracks and made his headquarters there."

Civil War followed the end of the Black and Tans War:

"On the night of the 23rd of November 1922, General Michael Kilroy held a meeting of his divisional staff in Carrowbeg House. The meeting was to brief his officers on their strategy, for the expected advance of Free State troops. Michael Kilroy, Jack Feehan and J. J. Leonard were asleep when a messenger from Feehan's of Rossow awoke them to say that the Free State troops were advancing towards Newport. An IRA column, under Paul Reilly, was in position in Kilmeena, but the Free State troops had slipped through in the dark. General Kilroy, Feehan and Leonard immediately ran to take up a position at Kilbride, at the fence between Frank Chambers and Peter McManamon's. When the Free State soldiers reached Ryders in Kilbride they were stopped by heavy fire from the three riflemen. The soldiers took cover and opened fire with a heavy machine gun on the IRA position which soon proved untenable. Leaving Feehan and Leonard to keep the soldiers from advancing, Kilroy crossed the road and railway line into Dyras field. He advanced further into Ryders which brought him to within 300 yards of the soldiers. From this position, he exchanged fire for some time before he fell back under heavy fire. He retreated down towards the railway line, where again he exchanged shots with the soldiers. Here his luck ran out and he was wounded and captured. Four Free State soldiers were killed and a number were wounded. The dead soldiers were; Captain Joseph Ruddy, Captain Joe Walsh, Private Woods and Private McEllin. Joe Walsh had been a member of Kilroy's Flying Column in the Black and Tan War. Ryder's cart was commandeered to bring the dead to Westport. General Kilroy was also brought to Westport and on to Castlebar, before being transferred to Mountjoy Jail. ...

"Conditions for the prisoners were very bad, and after unrest in Mountjoy, Michael Kilroy as senior officer in the Jail, called a general hunger strike, which lasted for 41 days. Ernie O'Malley, one of the hunger strikers, gives a horrific account of the strike in his book 'The Singing Flame'. The prison chaplain refused to give Communion to the prisoners, and after a visit to her husband, Mrs Nan Kilroy, on her husband's instruction, went to Cardinal Logue and complained about the Church attitude to the prisoners and immediately the chaplain gave the men Communion, although some refused to receive. Michael Kilroy escaped from jail and in 1924 most of the prisoners were released and, as little work was available, many emigrated to America.

"Sources [among several others]: Interviews with General Michael Kilroy."

Glenhest is about ten kilometers northeast of Newport—immediately west of Beltra Lough. The village of Cloondaff is in Glenhest. A little more than halfway between Newport and Cloonduff, on R317 (in the area known as Skerdagh, Irish grid reference L928 976) there is a ten foot Celtic cross erected as a memorial to the West Mayo Brigade who fought there in the Black and Tans War, under the command of General Michael Kilroy, against British forces, on May 23, 1921. There is another memorial at Kilmeena on the Newport-Wesport Road, a little over 3 miles south of Newport (Irish grid reference L978 876), which is almost a duplicate of the other, except the date of the fight was May 19, 1921. Here are photographs of the War of Independence Memorial at Kilmeena. I have an undated newspaper article that says there were two such memorials dedicated on the same day, one at Kilmeena and one at Skirdagh [Skerdagh] "below Newport." The text of the article indicates that the memorials were dedicated 50 years after the ambush at Kilmeena in May, 1921.

Here is the story of the two battles memorialized by these monuments from The War of Independence and Civil War in Newport by Willie Sammon:

"The arrival of the Black and Tans made life very difficult for the people and a Black and Tan District Inspector named Fudge, stationed in Newport, went around with a group of Tans and terrorised the countryside. He usually operated at night and scarcely a village escaped his raids. Many houses in Glenhest were wrecked by his gang and in Cuilmore, Owen Keane, Tom Lyons and Stephen McGough were very badly beaten and had their homes wrecked. An ambush was prepared at Kilbride to kill him one night, but it failed.

"During the early summer 1921 many ambush positions were held but the enemy never obliged. On the evening of May 18th 1921, Michael Kilroy sent a patrol of eight men into Westport, to attack any enemy in sight. At the same time, he sent Josie Doherty, O.C. Newport Battalion, with Jim Moran, Michael Gallagher and Jim Brown, into Newport. The Newport Patrol took up a position on Carrabaun, overlooking the R.I.C. Barracks, and during the day Sergeant Butler was killed. When Michael Kilroy heard the news he immediately moved the entire column of 41 men to Clooneen Cross in Kilmeena. He anticipated enemy troops moving from Westport to Newport. The column was armed with 22 rifles, 16 shotguns and 3 with shortarms. They took up positions in the early dawn and waited. At 3 pm two lorries and a car were sighted. The first lorry sped through the ambush position and was fired on without much effect. The second lorry and car halted at the priest's house, from where they directed heavy rifle and machine-gun fire on the IRA position. The IRA changed their position, to the fence at a right angle to the road, from where they fired on the Black and Tans.

"The first lorry, which had gone towards Newport, pulled up at Rossduane School, and the soldiers made their way back up the railway line to O'Flynn's house, from where they had a clear view of the IRA lines against the fence. A machine gun at O'Flynn's was trained on the IRA column with devastating effect, and in a few minutes, several where killed and wounded. Seamus McEvilly, Paddy Jordan, John Collins, Tom O'Donnell and Pat Staunton where killed. The wounded included Paddy Connolly, Paddy Molloy, James Swift, Michael Hughes, John Chambers, John Cannon and T. Nolan. One Tan was killed and a number wounded.

"The Newport men who fought at Kilmeena were;

* Tom O'Donnell,
* Jack Connolly,
* Michael Brown,
* Paddy Molloy,
* Pat McLaughlin,
* Larry McGovern,
* Ned Murray
* Paddy O'Malley.

"While the battle was still on, Fr. Killeen, C. C. Mulranny and Fr. Walsh C.C. Kilmeena went on to the field and anointed the dead and wounded. Caught between two fires, Kilroy ordered a retreat, and carrying some of the wounded they reached Aughagowla village where Dr Madden and Nurse Lottie Joyce of Clogher tended the wounded. Later that night, the broken column made their way to Skirdagh village, where they were made welcome. Dr Madden took the wounded to McDonnells and Dyras of Upper Skirdagh and in McDonnells he amputated two toes of the wounded Swift.

"The early morning of May 23rd found the men asleep in the houses of Lower Skirdagh, while sentries kept watch. Kilroy, Jim Moran and Jack Connolly where at McDonnells of Upper Skirdagh. Dr Madden was with the wounded in Dyras when a rapid volley of rifle fire broke the morning stillness. The sentry had seen a party of Tans and police near the village after making their way down the back road.

"Kilroy immediately ordered Jim Moran and Dr Madden to remove the wounded to safety while he and Connolly made their way to the source of the firing, where most of the men were billeted. Before they got to the men, they were fired on by the Tans and police lining the fence. Caught in the open, with no cover, they replied to the fire and kept them at bay. The rest of the Column took cover but Jim Brown of Kilmeena was fatally wounded as he crossed the river.

"Kilroy and Connolly where in a tight spot, as one of the Tans caught Pat O'Malley's horse and galloped into Newport for help. Kilroy and Connolly prevented the enemy from advancing but their ammunition was almost gone, when Dr Madden, from a better position opened rapid fire and gave the two men time to retreat. The fight continued and, as reinforcements came, the IRA men pulled back into the safety of the hills.

"By now, 40 lorries of soldiers were at Skirdagh School, and others had gone to Shramore. Five hundred men advanced up the hill in extended formation, and at the same time, they raked the hills with rifle and machine gun fire. The IRA men watched from a safe distance until night fell and then they slipped through enemy lines and made their way to Glenisland and on to Aughagower.

"After the retreat from Skirdagh, the entire Column came together again at Aughagower. On June 2nd at Carrowkennedy, they attacked two lorries of RIC and tans, numbering 25. The fight lasted for several hours, until the entire enemy force surrendered, after 12 were killed and a number wounded. The IRA had no casualties and they collected 25 rifles, 25 revolvers, a Lewis machine-gun, 5000 rounds of ammunition and boxes of bombs.

"The truce came a few weeks later, the treaty was signed, and the Civil War was about to start."

Here is an excerpt from a county Mayo newspaper article announcing a plan to construct the monuments:

"His [Michael Kilroys's] old comrades still recall his heroism at Kilmeena when his column almost surrounded and hard pressed was saved by his daring and complete disregard for his own safety. His stubborn rear guard action checked the enemy advance until his men regrouped and made their way to safety.

"A few mornings later a huge British force aided by planes from Castlebar aerodrome, made a sudden dawn attack on the on the broken column at Skirdagh where it was nursing the Kilmeena wounded. Here again it was the courage and bravery of Michael Kilroy that held the British back. Almost alone and caught in open ground under heavy fire, he held up the advance until his comrades came to his aide and the column escaped to the hills. Later, the heaviest defeat suffered by the Black and Tans was at Carrakennedy, Westport, where they were engaged by Kilroy and his men and after a long fight they surrendered after a number had been killed. Although advised to kill the prisoners, Kilroy let them march to their barracks in Westport."

Here is an excerpt from a county Mayo newspaper article of about 1971 describing the dedication of the two monuments:

"Frank Aiken Unveils West Mayo Brigade Memorials

"'I look forward to the day the whole of Ireland will be free,' said Mr. Frank Aiken, a former Chief of Staff of the Old I.R.A., when he performed the ceremony of unveiling two memorial Celtic Crosses—one at Kilmeena and the other at Skirdagh, below [i.e. northeast of] Newport, where battles between British Forces of occupation and the men of the West Mayo Flying Column, led by the late General Michael Kilroy of Newport in 1921."

The article reports that Michael Kilroy's widow attended the ceremonies, as did his son "F.C.A. Captain Peadar Kilroy, ... leader of the West Mayo Brigade." The article also reports that Aiken said "he was glad to see the men of the Old I.R.A. looking so well after fifty years." The article points out that the inscriptions on the two crosses were the same, except the cross at Kilmeena commemorated fighting on May 19, 1921, and the cross at Skirdagh commemorated fighting on May 23, 1921.

Michael Kilroy died on December 23, 1962. The President of Ireland, Eamon DeValera, attended his funeral at St. Patrick's Church in Newport. Also in attendance were over 500 members of the "old I.R.A." Michael Kilroy's gravestone is in the Irish language only. Buried with him is his wife "Aine" (Leonard) who died on July 19, 1976. They are buried at Burrishoole Abbey near Newport.

For more background, and another reference to Michael Kilroy, see The "Troubled Times" in Mayo by Eamonn Henry from the Mayo Gazette Newsletter (August 16, 2001—Twenty Eighth Edition).

They Put the Flag a-Flyin'—The Roscommon Volunteers 1916–1923 (Old IRA) by Kathleen Hegarty Thorne (1st Edition (2005) 2nd Edition, County Mayo Addendum, Published by Generation Organization, P.O. Box 5414, Eugene, OR 97405) added, in its Mayo section at page 464, a photograph of the "Men of the West" Flying Column commanded by Michael Kilroy. The first edition also mentions (at pages 98, 366, and 491) Richard McGough (McGoff) of the East Mayo Brigade (not Tuam) who commandeered a train near the town of Ballaghaderreen in county Roscommon on May 17, 1921, and was captured and imprisoned as a result. See the section called Ballaghadreen Town on my page: McGoughs in County Mayo. See also the website of the Addergoole Titanic Society for a copy of Jack Leonard's famous photograph The Men of the West taken at 11:45 pm on June 21, 1921 with the townland of Derrymartin on the southern slope of Mount Nephin as the backdrop. The man at the front and center of this photograph is Dr. John Madden. In the third (back) row, where the man are standing, the first man on the left is Michael Kilroy. (Photo 11/15 under Addergoole's Scenery.) The photograph is also reproduced, with an identification of the men, in the Rocommon People of Friday, April 20, 1947 (page 49). The picture may also be found above the heading "IRA: Mayo Flying Column — These men ‘defied six hundred British troops at Tourmakeady’ according to An t-Óglach. They lost one man and six shotguns in this famous battle." on the web page The Black & Tans in the Anglo-Irish War.

Regarding the photograph The Men of the West, 'The Story Of Mayo' (copyright Mayo County Library) has this to say:

Three weeks after the Carrowkennedy ambush, the 31 members of Kilroy’s Flying Column of the West Mayo Brigade were photographed by J.J. Leonard in what is considered one of the finest photographs of an active service unit during the War of Independence. The image was captured at Derrymartin on the southern slopes of Mount Nephin at 11.45pm on the evening of 21 June 1921 (the longest day of the year) with no light but the ‘light of Heaven’. The four men inset in the corners of the photograph are members of the Flying Column who were on duty at the time.

From The War of Independence (1919–1921) on the Historical Events Index of All Things Mayo | Meascra Mhaigh Eo'.

The photographer who took The Men of the West, J. J. Leonard, was the brother of Nan Leonard who married Michael Kilroy (and of Margaret Leonard who married michael's bother, John Francis Kilroy). Here is an excerpt from Memories of the men of the west by James Laffey that was published in the Western People (Ballina) of Wednesday, January 24, 2007:

One of the most bloody ambushes of the entire 'Tan' era took place at Carakennedy, near Westport, in June 1921 and resulted in heavy casualties for the British. The reprisals were swift and brutal. Many of the towns businesses were ransacked by British forces with furniture and and other items being piled high in the streets and set alight.

Not surprisingly, the familes of the IRA men who were suspected of participating in the ambush paid the heaviest price of all. Comdt Joe Ring - a grand uncle of current Mayo Deputy Michael Ring - had to watch from a distance as his parents' home at Drumindoo was burned to the ground. Michael Kilroy - the leader of the West Mayo flying column - returned to his blacksmiths' forge in Newport to discover that it had been completely gutted by the Black and Tans. Te Bofeenauan photographer, J. J. Leonard, who was a brother-in-law of Kilroy, took some extraordinary photographs of the rebel leader standing defiantly in his ruined forge. The photographs are still in the possession of the Leonard family and anyone who has ever seen them will certainly agree with the old adage that a picture paints a thousand words.

General Michael Kilroy in Parliament

Michael Kilroy was elected to the Irish parliament with Sinn Fein in the general election of August 27, 1923. He refused to take the oath required of members elected in 1923, and did not serve until re-elected in 1927 as part of Eamon DeValera's newly-formed Fianna Fail.

"Despite contesting the 1923 general election, 'anti-Treaty' Sinn Féin representatives refused to attend the Dáil. They were unwilling to take an Oath of Allegiance to the Free State Constitution, and an Oath of Fidelity to the King of England:

"I …… do solemnly swear true faith and allegiance to the Constitution of the Irish Free State as by law established, and that I will be faithful to His Majesty, King George V, his heirs and successor by law in virtue of the common citizenship of Ireland with Great Britain and her adherence to and membership of the group of nations forming the British Commonwealth of Nations"

History of the Dail Eireann.

Eamon de Valera refused to sign this Oath of Allegiance, which was required for admission to Dail Eireann, and pursued an abstentionist policy up to 1927. He founded Fianna Fail (the Republican Party) in 1926 and led Fianna Fail into the Dail after the general election of 1927.

If I read the postings by ElectionsIreland.org correctly, Michael Kilroy was elected to represent the people of south Mayo in the 4th Dail in 1923 (but refused to take the oath), the 5th Dail in June of 1927 (as a member of the Fianna Fail party), the 6th Dail in September of 1927, the 7th Dail in 1932, and the 8th Dail in 1933. He stood for election in 1937, 1944, and 1954, but was not elected. His obituary says he was a deputy until 1937.

 

General Michael Kilroy in Mountjoy Prison

General Kilroy fought the truce made by the IRA with the British in 1922. Post-Civil War hunger-strikes, by Wayne Sugg, from An Phoblacht/Republican News, Thursday, October 15, 1998, tells us:

"The Civil War in Ireland began in earnest on 28 June 1922 with the fledgling state's attack on the republican outpost in the Four Courts in Dublin. It ended with the cease fire and dump arms order on 23 May 1923 by the IRA's Chief of Staff Frank Aiken. Eleven months of civil war were at an end, but even so six months later the state continued to extract revenge on those who dared challenge their new found `authority', keeping over 12,000 men and women imprisoned, hounding others out of their country, forcing them out of employment and harassing republicans in any way, legal and illegal, they could.

"By October of 1923 tension was building among the imprisoned republicans because of the conditions in the jails and camps in which they were incarcerated and because they were still imprisoned with no release in sight. On 13 October they resolved to begin a hunger-strike to highlight their demands and alleviate their plight. The O/C of the republican POWs in Mountjoy Jail, Michael Kilroy, announced a hunger-strike of 300 POWs in the jail. The hunger-strike soon spread to the other jails and within a matter of days 7,033 republicans were on hunger-strike."

Here is a quote from The Forgotten Hunger Strikes:

"On 23 May 1923, the Irish Civil War officially ended, but the state continued to go after republicans, keeping 12,000 men and women in prison and persecuting and harassing countless others. By October of 1923 tension was at an all-time high in the prisons and camps because of conditions and with no release in sight. On 13 October 1923, Michael Kilroy, OC of the IRA pows in Mountjoy, announced a mass strike by 300 prisoners, and it soon spread to other jails, and within days 7,033 republicans were on hunger strike. The figures given by Sinn Féin at the time were Mountjoy Jail 462; Cork Jail 70; Kilkenny Jail 350; Dundalk Jail 200; Gormanstown Camp 711; Newbridge Camp 1,700; Tintown 1,2,3, Curragh Camp 3,390; Harepark Camp 100; and, 50 women in the North Dublin Union."

The report of the proceedings of the Irish Parliament, Dail Eireann, of March 2, 1923, tells the story of the capture and trial of General Michael Kilroy:

"SEOIRSE GHABHAIN UI DHUBHTHAIGH: To ask the Minister for Defence whether he is aware:—

(1) That Michael Kilroy was taken prisoner near Newport on 24th November, 1922, and confined in Custume Barracks, Athlone, until about the 1st day of February, 1923, when he was removed to Mountjoy Prison, Dublin.

(2) That on the 8th February, 1923, the prisoner was handed a charge sheet, containing three charges alleged to have been incurred near Newport, on 24th November, 1922.

(3) That on the 9th February, 1923, the prisoner wrote to the Prison Governor, asking for facilities to prepare his defence, but that the first intimation received by the prisoner's solicitor of his desire to instruct him was given to the solicitor at 5 o'clock in the afternoon of 13th February, 1923, whereas the trial of the prisoner was fixed for and took place at 11 o'clock on 14th February, 1923.

(4) That accordingly no fair opportunity was given to the solicitor to prepare the prisoner's defence.

(5) That an application for an adjournment of the trial to enable the defence to be prepared was made on behalf of the prisoner to the Military Tribunal, and refused.

(6) That one of the preliminary objections, taken on behalf of the prisoner, to the proceedings was that the Court was convened by a person other than the Officer Commanding the area in which the offences were charged to have been committed, as required by the regulations as to the trial of civilians by Military Tribunals; that the objection was over-ruled on the ground that a special order had been made taking the case out of this regulation; that such order was not produced, and was not proved in any way; and that such an order, if made, would be ultra vires and void; and

(7) That all civil courts are open or capable of being held in Dublin; and whether, upon these facts, he will see the propriety of having the proceedings in question set aside and quashed.

"General MULCAHY: The answers to the first and second parts of the question are in the affirmative.

"With regard to the third and fourth parts of the question:—The officer who delivered the charge sheet to the accused asked him upon doing so whether he wished to have a solicitor to defend him, and if so, to give the name of any solicitor so that facilities could be given such solicitor to interview the accused and prepare his defence. The accused replied that he did not wish to be defended and stated that he would not recognise the court. At the same time he mentioned the names of some military witnesses he desired to have summoned.

"The accused subsequently wrote two letters to the Governor of Mountjoy Gaol. In one of these he asked for a copy of the regulations under which he was to be tried. These were duly furnished him. In neither letter did the accused ask for an interview with any counsel or solicitor nor did he give the name of any counsel or solicitor whom he wished to defend him. It was not until the 13th February that the accused wrote a letter to Mr. Sean O h-Uadhaigh regarding his defence. This was immediately transmitted to Mr. h-Uadhaigh, as a result of which Mr. Conor Maguire, counsel for the accused, interviewed the accused at 10.20 a.m. upon the 14th February. The delay in communicating with his legal advisers was due to the hesitation of the accused in deciding whether he would be defended or not. It may be added that the trial of the accused was postponed from the 9th February to the 14th February, to endeavour to secure the attendance of military witnesses mentioned by the accused.

"With regard to the fifth part of the question: the application for an adjournment was made at the trial. Counsel for the accused, when asked for the grounds of his application, stated that he wished to have certain witnesses present to prove an alibi upon the first charge. The Legal Officer stated that he intended to direct an acquittal upon the first charge owing to lack of evidence to sustain it and an acquittal was directed. As no sufficient grounds for granting an adjournment were stated, and in view of the facts already stated, the application was refused. It may be added that the accused, though he might have done so, did not give evidence to deny any of the charges.

"With regard to the sixth part of the question: Upon the 12th February an Order was made by the Army Council providing that their previous Regulations as to Military Courts being convened by the General Officer Commanding the Command in which the offence was alleged to have been committed, should not apply to the trial of the accused, and expressly authorising the General Officer Commanding the Dublin Command to convene a Court for the trial of the accused. Counsel objected to this Order as being ultra vires because it was not laid upon the Table of An Dáil for four days as provided by the Army Emergency Powers Resolution of An Dáil. As this provision obviously applied only to Regulations the breach of which was triable as an offence by Military Court, the objection was over-ruled. The Order of the Army Council was not required to be proved as the Court held that they were satisfied as to their jurisdiction and would not require the presence of the Army Council as witnesses to prove their Order. The Court made a note of the objection so that it could be considered by the Army Council when the proceedings of the Court came before the Army Council for confirmation. It may be added that between the time the accused was arrested and the date of his trial the Commands were reorganised, the area and character of the old Western Command in which the offences charged against the accused were alleged to have been committed being entirely altered.

"With regard to the seventh part of the question, I would refer to the answer given to the previous question of the Deputy for County Dublin upon the same point."

General Michael Kilroy was incarcerated again in Mountjoy Prison after he had been elected to the Irish parliament. Here are excerpts from Irish Parliamentary Debates of December 27, 1926:

"LIAM MAG AONGHUSA asked the Minister for Justice whether Mr. Michael Kilroy, T.D., Mayo, and Dr. Madden, T.D., Mayo, are interned in Mountjoy Prison; if he will state the reasons why these Deputies were arrested, and why they are now detained; if he is aware that Mayo is, and has long been, in a peaceful state, and whether there is any ground for the allegation that these Deputies are refused permission to have books and newspapers sent in by friends, and that food supplies sent them by their friends are withheld.

"Mr. O'HIGGINS [Minister for Justice]: Mr. Michael Kilroy and Dr. Madden, of Mayo, are detained in Mountjoy Prison under the provisions of the Public Safety (Emergency Powers) Act, 1926. These gentlemen have been detained as a precautionary measure, because there was ground for supposing that they were prominent members of the illegal organisation which was responsible for the recent concerted attacks on police barracks. [The Minister for Justice and Vice-President of the Executive Council, Kevin O'Higgins, was assassinated in July 1927. Seanad Éireann - Volume 9 - 12 July, 1927, Assasination of the Vice-President]

"There are no grounds for the allegation that they have been refused permission to receive books and newspapers sent in by friends, or that food supplies sent them by their friends are withheld.

"Professor MAGENNIS: I note that the Minister in his reply refers to these gentlemen as Mr. Kilroy and Dr. Madden. Is he aware that they are T.D.'s? Does he not consider that to detain them on suspicion is, after all, a breach of privilege of this House?

"Mr. O'HIGGINS: I hope they have as much respect for this House as I have.

"Mr. JOHNSON: Can the Minister give any information about the position of those interned prisoners—whether they are allowed provisions and books from outside and time for exercise— the usual privileges of internees who have not been tried?

[457] "Mr. O'HIGGINS: I dealt with that in reply to a question the other day. They are allowed books or papers that may be sent into them, and they are allowed to write any letters they wish, subject to the usual conditions.

"Mr. JOHNSON: Are they allowed parcels of food?

"Mr. O'HIGGINS: Yes, if food is sent in.

"Mr. JOHNSON: Can the Minister say whether they are kept in their cells or in an enclosed place and not allowed to exercise—that they are kept in their cells for twenty-one hours in the day?

"Mr. O'HIGGINS: That would probably vary. There are some nineteen prisoners detained at Mountjoy, some in Cork and some in Waterford, and it would vary in accordance with the exigencies of the prison staff, but generally the view would be to give as much exercise as is reasonably possible having regard to the number of staff engaged in each prison."

For an account of interments arising from the Civil War in Ireland that followed the Black and Tan War, see chapter 4, Interment in the Twenty-Six Counties 1922–1973, from Internment by John McGuffin (1973). Michael Kilroy is mentioned in connection with a hunger strike at of Mountjoy Prison. Another good article that mentions Michael Kilroy is The "Troubled Times" in Mayo from the Mayo Gazette Newsletter of August 16th, 2001. See also The Irish Civil War, 1922-1923: A Military Study of the Conventional Phase, 28 June - 11 August, 1922, by Paul V. Walsh, which lists "4th Western Division (AT) (the west of Co. Mayo and the west of Co. Galway)- O/C Comdt. Gen. Michael Kilroy. Among the units that made up this Division were the following: ... West Mayo Brigade - O/C Comdt. Gen.Michael Kilroy," and three Regional Commands of the Irish Republican Army:

"Northern and Eastern Command - Comdt. Ernie O'Malley

"Western Command - Michael Kilroy

"Southern Command - Liam Deasy."

In the Chronology of Irish History 1919–1923 are these entries:

Oct 16–17, 1922

"Anti-Treaty Executive meets in Mrs Nugent's, Poulatar, Ballybacon, and decides on the minimum terms that would be accepted in any peace negotiations. Also called on De Valera to form a Republican Government and pledges this Government support and allegiance 'while it functions as the Government of the Republic'. It also said that any arrangement this Government made with the British or Free State governments had to be submitted to the Executive for ratification. Ten of the sixteen member of the Executive were present at the meeting. Four were prisoners (Rory O'Connor; Liam Mellows; Joe McKelvey and Peadar O'Donnell) so they were replaced by Sean Lehane (for O'Donnell); Sean McSwiney (for Mellows); Con Moloney (O'Connor) and Frank Aiken (for McKelvey). They also set up an Army Council consisting of Liam Lynch; Ernie O'Malley; Liam Deasy; Tom Derrig and Frank Aiken. (Joe O'Connor; Con Moloney; and Michael Kilroy were appointed to replace any member of the Army Council who is shot or captured.) [designated one, two, and three in that order.]"

***

"November 24. 1922

"Michael Kilroy - Commandant of the Western Command of the Anti-Treaty IRA is wounded and captured."

The references are to No Other Law by Florence O'Donoghue, pages 271 and 278, Anvil Books, Dublin (1986).

 

Biography of Michael Kilroy

Here is an essay by Brian Hoban that has been published on the Internet, under Newport History, by Mayo on the Move:

"General Michael Kilroy

"Major General Michael Kilroy was Commandant of the 4th Western Battalion, Old IRA, and played a leading part in the War of Independence.

"He lived and died in a house on the Carrickaneady Road. Kilroy a blacksmith by trade* was deeply religious and very proper and had a great dislike for anybody who drank alcohol. On one occasion in mid winter while attending a Brigade Council meeting, the woman of the house arrived with a tray of glasses and a bottle of Poitín, to warm them up as it was snowing heavily outside. When offered the Poitín Kilroy replied: “Ma’am we don’t drink.”

"In September 1920 Michael Kilroy was appointed Vice O.C. Mayo Brigade IRA. The following November a meeting of the Brigade Council was held in Kelly’s of Brockagh 4 miles N.E. of Newport at which it was decided to set up active service units. Kilroy was appointed Brigade O.C. The Active Service Units were not successful, as most members were known to the R.I.C. so it was decided to engage in guerrilla warfare. The West Mayo Flying Column was set up with Kilroy as its leader.

Kilmeena Ambush

"On the 18th May 1921 it was decided to attack a joint Black and Tan/ R.I.C convoy at Kilmeena. The column of 41 IRA men took up position close to Knocknabola Bridge at 3 a.m. By noon the British convoy had not arrived and Kilroy was thinking of moving away. They held out however and at around 3 p.m the convoy arrived. In the ensuing battle one R.I.C. man Beckett was wounded and later died. The British regrouped around the house of the parish priest, Fr. Conroy, and launched a counter attack. Four of the IRA forces were killed. They were Seamus Mc Evilly, Thomas O'Donnell, Patrick Staunton and Sean Collins. Paddy Jordan of the Castlebar battalion was injured and died later at Bricens Hospital in Dublin. In a follow up attack Volunteer Jim Browne was killed in action. The whole affair was a disaster. Kilroy’s greatest achievement was to get the column to safety without any further casualties.

Carrowkennedy [Carrickaneady]

"On the 2nd June 1921 Kilroy accompanied by Moane and Madden set out to choose a suitable place for an attack on the Westport/Leenane road. The column consisted of 33 men on this occasion. They took up position between Widow Sammon’s House and that of Widow Mc Grale in Carrowkennedy. Soon the Black and Tans arrived and a soldier took out a machine gun, but he was put down instantly. Another soldier who tried to take his place was also put down. The British then started to use grenades. One of their number was about to launch another grenade when he was shot and the grenade fell back into the lorry and exploded injuring several of the Tans and soon afterwards they surrendered. In all 13 of the British party were killed and 13 surrendered. A large quantity of arms and ammunition were also seized.

"This ambush had been a tremendous success for the IRA and it boosted their confidence immensely. The boys then went on the run throughout the region sheltering in safe houses. While near Laherdane in the vicinity of Nephin Mountain they were visited by Jack Leonard, a cousin of Michael Kilroy, who took the only photograph of the flying Column that exists up to the present day. The following October the 4th Western Division was set up as part of an organisational move and Kilroy was appointed its O.C.

The Civil War Years and Aftermath

"The Treaty was opposed by most of the IRA leaders in Mayo and not much is recorded of the civil war period in Mayo. The Catholic Church denounced many of the IRA men and many of the Anti Treaty side were interned by the Free State forces.

"In February 1922 the Infantry Barracks in Castlebar was taken over and turned into the H.Q. for the 4th Western Division. The barracks was evacuated on the 24th July on instructions from Kilroy and an attempt was made to burn it down. Only one wing was destroyed however.

"When Michael Kilroy joined the newly formed Fianna Fail Party it came as a bit of a shock to his colleagues. He was a member of Dail Eireann from 1927 to 1937. After the formation of the first Fianna Fail Government in 1932 he proposed De Valera as its President. He was also Chairman of Mayo County Council for many years until his retirement from public life in 1937. Following his retirement he was a member of the Hospitals Commission.

"He died in December 1962 at his home on Carrickaneady Road. A huge crowd, including over 500 IRA Veterans attended the funeral ceremonies. President De Valera, who was accompanied by his ADC, Col. Brennan, attended the Requiem mass in St. Patrick’s Church, Newport, celebrated by Cannon Killeen P.P. The Most Rev. M. Mc Keown, DD, Auxiliary Bishop of Perth, Australia, a native of Drummin, Westport also presided at the mass.

"On arrival the President was met by a guard of honour of IRA Veterans under Captain William O'Malley. He was greeted at the church door by Cannon Killeen and escorted to a seat in the sanctuary. Also present were Mr. Boland, Minister for Social Welfare; Mr. Aitken, Minister for External Affairs; Mr.O'Morain, Minister for Lands; Mr. Bartley, Minister for Defence and Mr. Brian Lenihan, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Lands. Heading the two mile funeral to Burrishoole Cemetery was the Westport Brass Band under Mr. P. Mc Conville. At the graveside Comdt. Edward Moane delivered an oration, and a firing party of the old I.R.A. men under Capt. P. Duffy fired three volleys over the grave. Lieut. C.Kelly, Westport F.C.A. sounded the Last Post. Cannon Killeen, assisted by Rev. R. Horan recited the last prayers. His colleagues donated the stained glass windows over the Sacred Heart and Lady’s Altar in St. Patrick’s Church, in his memory."

*Here is an excerpt from the Wednesday, December 29, 2010, edition of Western People (Ballina) entitled Life in Mayo in the early days of Ballina Golf Club:

"The Western People in those days contained nothing but advertisements on its front page, including classifieds for situations vacant and public notices for auctioneering firms. Among the companies advertising on January 21, 1911, were the Kilroy Bros in Newport, who were coachbuilders and coffin-makers. Michael Kilroy would later take a very active part in the War of Independence, commanding the IRA’s West Mayo flying column in various engagements in Westport, Newport, Louisburgh and Islandeady."

Here is part of an email I received from Kevin Corbett on October 31, 2006:

"I was born and raised in Newport, have lived in America since 1971.

"I well remember the funeral of Major-General Kilroy. It is in fact probably my earliest memory of a public event (I was after all only eight or nine years old). I can vaguely remember the man himself as a rather slight figure. My father was at the time the Chemist (pharmacist) in town and it occasionally fell to me to deliver medicine to 'the Major-General's house'. It might be of interest to know that he was always referred to by his full title...Major General Kilroy.

"His funeral was a huge affair. By far the largest gathering I'd ever seen. I, along with other youngsters watched it from what was called 'the Bray'...the hill leading up to the church. From there we could observe not only the cars as they passed us on the Bray but also the leading cars out on the Mulrany Road.

"And of course I knew his son and grandson. His son operated a welding workshop across the road from the house. He was also a sergeant in the FCA (later the LDF - Local Defense Force) and a noted rifle-shot with the Lee Enfield .303."

See also: Mayo on the Move—10th Anniversary—2006, where Brian Hoban's essay on General Michael Kilroy is reproduced.

In Archives of Western People of September 13, 2006, this article is published under the heading of "Newport/Mularanny—Big strides in Tidy Towns":

"GENERAL MICHAEL KILROY

The role played by Major General Michael Kilroy in the founding and development of the Fianna Fáil party was highlighted by Cllr Frank Chambers in a speech delivered at a function in Castlebar to mark the 80th anniversary of the party. Cllr Chambers who is the Fianna Fáil candidate for Castlebar and West Mayo in the coming general election welcomed the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern, Ministers, T.Ds, Senators and Councillors, and in particular, Minister Eamon O’Cuiv and Minister Sile De Valera, grandson and granddaughter of the late Eamon De Valera, to the celebration. Cllr Chambers said: 'As tonight we celebrate the 80th anniversary of the founding of Fianna Fáil, I would like to pay tribute to Major General Michael Kilroy, a Newport man whose name is remembered in the local Cumann that bears his name.

'Major General Michael Kilroy was Commandant of the 4th Western Battalion, Old IRA. and played a leading part in the War of Independence. He lived with his wife and family on the Carrickaneady Road, Newport. A blacksmith by trade, Michael was a deeply religious and devout man.

'In September 1920 Michael was appointed Vice O.C. Mayo Brigade IRA. He set up and was leader of The West Mayo Flying Column.

“Michael led the ambush at Kilmeena in May 1921 where his greatest achievement was to get the column to safety with only four casualties. Like most of the IRA leaders in Mayo, Kilroy opposed the Treaty. In February 1922 the Infantry Barracks in Castlebar was taken over under his leader-ship and turned into the H.Q. for the 4th Western Division.

“Michael Kilroy joined the newly-formed Fianna Fail party, this decision was crucial to the peaceful formation of the new state. It was also important in assisting Eamon De Valera in founding Fiannna Fáil. Michael Kilroy was a member of Dail Eireann from 1927 to 1937.

'After the formation of the first Fianna Fail Government in 1932 he proposed De Valera as its President and was seconded by Oscar Traynor. He was also Chairman of Mayo County Council for many years until his retirement from public life in 1937. Following his retirement he was a member of the Hospitals Commission.”

Cllr Chambers stated: 'He died in December 1962 at his home on Carrickaneady Road. A huge crowd, including over 500 IRA Veterans attended the funeral ceremonies. President De Valera, attended the Requiem Mass in St. Patrick’s Church, Newport.

'His funeral was an outstanding tribute to his life attended by numerous Government Ministers of the day. Heading the two-mile funeral to Burrishole Cemetery was the Westport Brass Band under Mr. P. McConville.

'At the graveside Comdt. Edward Moane delivered an oration, and a firing party of the old I.R.A. men under Capt. P. Duffy fired three volleys over the grave. Lieut. C.Kelly, Westport F.C.A. sounded the Last Post. A magnificent stained glass window was erected by his colleagues at St Patrick’s Church, Newport in his memory.

'Tonight we are honouring Major Michael Kilroy and commend him on the great contribution he has made to Fianna Fail.

'We are also delighted to welcome his family, Peadar Kilroy, his son who has also given a life long commitment to Fianna Fail as past chairman and now president of the Michael Kilroy cumman. We would like to welcome his daughter Dr. Maeve Kilroy and daughter in law Mrs Anne Kilroy We would also like to welcome his numerous grandchildren, Anne Marie Kilroy McManamon, Paul Kilroy and members of the Reid family here tonight.

'This is the first occasion we have come together on a County basis since the convention on the 26th March. At that convention, you decisively selected me with an overall majority as the Castlebar, West Mayo Candidate.

“Thank you for all your support, however, we have a great challenge ahead of us. Mayo geographically is the largest and most competitive constituency in the country. We need to regain and return confidence in Fianna Fail to gain back the sears we lost.

“I am determined to win back this seat in the Castle-bar, West Mayo area. My campaign started the day of the convention following my years experience as a County Councillor, and my term in the Senate, I am the most experienced politician on the Fianna Fail team for Mayo, and I am determined that I will win back this seat.

'We must offer the people of Mayo leadership and pride that is necessary to rejuvenate Fianna Fail Politics and bring back the Fianna Fail seats to Mayo,' the councillor said.'"

Here are articles from Wikipedia:

"Carrowkennedy ambush.

"The Carrowkennedy Ambush was an incident in Ireland's War of Independence. On 2 June 1921, Major General Michael Kilroy, later Commandant of the 4th Western Battalion of the IRA, led a flying column of 33 men. They took up position between Widow Sammon’s House and that of Widow McGreal in Carrowkennedy, near Westport in County Mayo. A group of Black and Tans arrived. 13 of the British side were killed and 13 surrendered. A large quantity of arms were seized. Many of the local people went into hiding to avoid the retribution of the Tans. The Irish fighters went on the run throughout the region sheltering in safe houses.

"This ambush had been a tremendous success for the local IRA and it boosted their confidence immensely."

"Chronology of the Irish War of Independence

"2 June 1921: Carrowkennedy ambush, county Mayo. Michael Kilroy and the IRA's West Mayo Flying Column ambush a convoy of RIC and Black and Tans. Six police are killed and six are wounded, two of them fatally. The surviving seventeen police surrender, and the IRA seize a large quantity of arms. Many of the local people go into hiding to avoid the retribution of the Tans. The Irish fighters went on the run throughout the region sheltering in safe houses."

"Chronology of the Irish Civil War

"12 September 1922: Republicans under Michael Kilroy take Ballina, county Mayo, in a surprise attack while the National Army troops there are at a Mass service for a comrade killed in the fighting. Kilroy's men capture 100 rifles, 20,000 rounds of ammunition and are reported by Free State authorities to have looted £25,000 worth of goods from local shops. Kilroy later admits to drunkenness and indiscipline on behalf of his men. The Republicans leave the town when Free State reinforcements arrive. The Republican's armoured car breaks down in the retreat and has to be abandoned.

"14 September 1922: Republicans under Michael Kilroy ambush a Free State convoy near Belderg, county Mayo, taking 16 prisoners.

"16 September 1922: Michael Kilroy's Anti-Treaty IRA men attack Newport, county Mayo, but fail to take it and withdraw after a day of fighting.

"29 October 1922: Anti-Treaty IRA under Michael Kilroy attack and take Clifden, county Galway, capturing 80 Free State soldiers.

"23 November 1922: A National Army force surprises Michael Kilroy and the leader of the Mayo anti-treaty IRA at Carrowbeg house. In the ensuing fight, 4 Free State soldiers are killed but Kilroy and several of his officers are captured."

 

"Kilroy was here."

For the origins of the phrase "Kilroy was here," go to Legends of "Kilroy Was Here" and click on "Site 1." Here is what is generally accepted as the true story:

"Legend #1: This Legend of how 'Kilroy was here' starts is with James J. Kilroy, a shipyard inspector [in Quincy, Massachusetts] during WWII. He chalked the words on bulkheads to show that he had been there and inspected the riveting in the newly constructed ship. To the troops in those ships, however, it was a complete mystery — all they knew for sure was that he had 'been there first.' As a joke, they began placing the graffiti wherever they (the US forces) landed or went, claiming it was already there when they arrived."

Here is the BBC's explanation:

"James J. Kilroy was a ship inspector at the Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts, USA. It was his responsibility to check on how many holes a riveter had filled in a shift on any given day. In order to prevent double counting by dishonest riveters and to prove to his supervisors that he'd been doing his work, he began marking 'Kilroy was here' inside the hulls of the ships being built. He used yellow crayon so it would be easily visible; this way the off-shift inspectors wouldn't count the rivets more than once and pay the riveter for work he hadn't done.

"Once the ship became operative, carrying military troops that were headed overseas and bound for the war, the phrase was a complete mystery. Why it was there and being found in such out of the way places made it all the more mysterious. All they could be certain of was that Kilroy, whoever he was, had 'been there first'. As a joke, troops began placing the graffiti wherever the US forces landed and claimed it had already been there when they'd arrived."

According to Michael Quinton's World Wide Words, the New York Times published this explanation on December 24, 1946:

“During the war he [James J Kilroy, of Halifax, Massachusetts] was employed at the Bethlehem Steel Company’s Quincy shipyard, inspecting tanks, double bottoms and other parts of warships under construction. To satisfy superiors that he was performing his duties, Mr. Kilroy scribbled in yellow crayon ‘Kilroy was here’ on inspected work. Soon the phrase began to appear in various unrelated places, and Mr. Kilroy believes the 14,000 shipyard workers who entered the armed services were responsible for its subsequent world-wide use”.

Quinton goes on to comment:

"The problem is that there is evidence that the name, and the phrase, were being used in this way even before the US entered the War at the end of 1941."

A History of Shipbuilding at Fore River by Anthony F. Sarcone and Lawrence S. Rines gives more detail:

"One of the most interesting stories to come out of the war is that of 'Kilroy was here.' The 'Kilroy was here' phrase appeared everywhere during World War II, but its origin did not become widely known until after the war had ended. In 1946 the American Transit Association ran a contest to find out where and why the phrase originated. As it turned out, the winner was James J. Kilroy of Boston. It seems as if Kilroy was hired by Fore River shipyard on December 5, 1941 as a checker. His job was to count the rivet holes and then leave chalk marks where he had left off. It was on this basis that the riveter's piece of work was calculated. Some of the riveters were not too honest and would erase the mark left by Kilroy. Thus, some of the rivet holes were counted twice. Kilroy got wind of this devious practice and proceeded to scrawl 'Kilroy was here' on his rounds. He reportedly left his mark on such famous Fore River vessels as the battleship, Massachusetts, now berthed permanently at 'Battleship Cove', Fall River, Massachusetts, the Carrier, Lexington (II), and the heavy cruiser, Baltimore, as well as numerous troop carriers. In later life Kilroy became a Boston City Councillor and state representative. He died on November 26 [should be 24], 1962." (citing) Joseph Salak, "Kilroy Was Here," Our Navy, (October, 1971), 12-13. See also: Quincy Patriot Ledger, April 11, 1975, n.p."

When James J. Kilroy died on November 24, 1962, at age 60, he was survived by his oldest daughter, Margaret Kilroy Fitzgerald, of Halifax, Massachusetts, and eight other children, whose ages in 1948, were, James 13, Mary Ann 12, Robert 10, Ellen 9, Ann 6, Kathleen 4, Larry 3, and Judy six months. Margaret was 15 in 1948. See her story on the web page: How we got started...

See also: Quincy's Shipbuilding Heritage, which says:

"The phrase 'Kilroy was here' and the accompanying graphic of a bald headed character looking over a fence was the trademark of Fore River Shipyard welder inspector James J. Kilroy."

 

Origins of the Surname Kilroy

On his gravestone, the surname of General Michael Kilroy is spelled only in Irish: Miceail Mic Giollaruaid. On the monument near Glenhest, the Irish spelling is Micael Mac Giolla Ruaid. On the gravestone of Teel's grandmother, Matilda, in Burrishoole Cemetery, the name is spelled only in Irish: Maitilda Nic Giollaruaid.

Irish Ancestors gives as the origin of Kilroy "Galway-Roscommon-Sligo, Midlands etc. Ir. Mac Giolla Rua (red-haired servant)." It also lists the Irish name Mac Giolla Ruaidh as the equivalent of Mac Elroy, Gilroy, Kilroy, and a variant of Kilroy not listed in the survey. (Notice that on the gravestones at Burrishoole Abbey, Giolla and Ruaidh are combined into one word, and there is no h at the end of Ruaidh.) According to McBain's Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language: gille=lad, servant, Irish giolla, Early Irish gilla; ruadh=red, ruddy, Irish ruadh, Early Irish rúad,.

In the 1890 birth records of Ireland, Kilroy was most common in Mayo (47), followed by Roscommon (43), Sligo (34), Galway (25), and Cavan (19). All other counties were below 10. In the same birth records, there were a total of 214 Kilroys and 96 Gilroys, another variant of the surname. (There were also 29 Kilroes, 11 Gilroys, 466 McElroys, and 309 McIlroys.)

 

Edward "Ned" and Matilda "Tillie" Kilroy and their Descendants

The grandparents of my wife Teel (Matilda) Whelton McGough were Edward Kilroy (c. 1842– c. 1902 ?) of Furnace, Newport, county Mayo, and Matilda Kilroy (c. 1859–August 19, 1908) of Carrickaneady, Newport. They were married on November 20, 1873, in Derryloughan. The 1901 census of parish of Burrishoole parish, county Mayo, shows Edward Kilroy in house #1 in the townland of Derryloughan More. He is listed as a married head of a family, Roman Catholic, age 59, and a shepherd. In the same house is his wife, Matilda, age 42.

The Chambers Family History, written in 1978 by Michael Chambers (born in Furnace on June 30, 1916) is a worthwhile resource on the history of this Kilroy family.

"Long Jim Kilroy lived in the old home. The other brother John lived quite near. Jim and John were married to two sisters named Keane from Gortaworla, a village quite near. Their sister Tilly Kilroy was married to Eddie Kilroy and they lived in Derrylahan [also spelled Derryloughan] about a half a mile from Newport on the East side of the Mulranny road. Eddie Kilroy was born in Furnace and was a brother to Jimmy Kilroy who was married to Mary Chambers my aunt. Michael Kilroy the TD* was son to Eddie and Tilly of Derrylahan."

*TD = T.D.: (Member of the Dail, or Irish Parliament of the 26 counties. Glossary of Irish Terms and Acronyms.

There are more extensive quotations from this work below.

One genealogy chart of the Chambers family on the Internet says that Margaret Chambers was the maiden name of the mother of the Matilda (Tillie) Kilroy who married Edward (Ned) Kilroy. The chart is a family tree collected on the Newport Historical Society Genealogy page of the Burrishoole Roots website. You can also enter this site through the Chambers family page. The Chambers Family History goes on to say this:

"Margaret Chambers was step sister to my grand dad Tom. She was a Mrs Kilroy from Carrickaneady about one and a half miles the Castlebar side of Newport. She had 4 sons and 2 daughters. Two of her sons got killed on the railway in America.

"Long Jim Kilroy lived in the old home. The other brother John lived quite near. Jim and John were married to two sisters named Keane from Gortaworla, a village quite near.

"Their sister Tilly Kilroy was married to Eddie Kilroy and they lived in Derrylahan about a half a mile from Newport on the East side of the Mulranny road. Eddie Kilroy was born in Furnace and was a brother to Jimmy Kilroy who was married to Mary Chambers my aunt ...

"Michael Kilroy the TD was son to Eddie and Tilly of Derrylahan." [Derryloughan is the modern way to spell the townland.] (For more extensive quotation from this article, see the end of this section.)

County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880, by William G. Masterson, at page 55, lists these children born to Michael Kilroy, landholder of Carrickaneady, and Margaret Chambers: James Kilroy, born September 16, 1864; Margaret Kilroy, born August 5, 1866; John Kilroy, born June 7, 1868; Elenor Kilroy, born June 9, 1870; and Dominick Kilroy, born on November 4, 1872. This listing does not include my wife's grandmother, Matilda Kilroy, who most sources say was a daughter of Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers; nor does the list include her brother, Martin Kilroy.

An email of September 29, 2002, from Ray Geraghty of New York, also says that Matilda Kilroy's parents were Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers, and says that Matilda had a brother, Martin Kilroy, who moved from Ireland to St. Louis:

"Martin Kilroy* born.1862 in Carrickaneady, Newport, Co. Mayo, a brother of Matilda, son of Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers emigrated to USA in the 1890s. Martin settled in St. Louis and married my grandfather's sister Mary Geraghty, also from Carrickaneady."

"I was in St. Louis two weeks ago for the first time and met some of Martin's grandchildren."

*The 1900 census of St. Louis, Missouri (roll 889, page 236), lists at 2917 Newstead Avenue Martin Kilroy, age 30, born in Ireland in January, 1870, married for 3 years, 24 years in the US, naturalized, a policeman; his wife, Marie K. Kilroy, age 27, born in Ireland in August, 1872, emigrated in 1882, 18 years in the US, mother of 2 children, both living; with their two sons, Robert M. Kilroy, age 1, born in Missouri in August of 1898; and Francis Kilroy, age 1 month, born in Missouri in April, 1900. The manifest of the Baltic, which arrived in New York from Queenstown on October 28, 1904, lists as US citizens, with a last residence in Newport, and with a husband and father named Martin Kilroy at 2917 Newstead Avenue, St Louis: Mrs. Maria Kilroy, age 30, married, a housewife; Robert Kilroy, age 5, born in America; Francis Kilroy, age 4, born in America; Martin Kilroy, age 1, born in America; and Louis Kilroy, age 1 month, who had beeen born in Ireland.

County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, at page 55, lists as born to Martin Kilroy, landholder of Carrickaneady, and Bridget Geraghty, the following children: Patrick Kilroy, born February 15, 1868; Mary Kilroy, born March 25, 1869; James Kilroy, born March 11, 1871; John Kilroy, born November 16, 1872; Matilda Kilroy, born August 20, 1874; Martin Kilroy, born October 24, 1876; Thomas Kilroy, born November 28, 1878; Michael Kilroy, born July 22, 1880; and Dominick Kilroy, born July 22, 1880. Additional children listed in Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40, are: Bridget Kilroy, born December 28, 1882; and Peter Kilroy, born on January 20, 1887. The 1901 census of Burrishoole parish lists in the townland of Carrickaneady: Martin Kilroy, age 60, farmer, Roman Catholic, born in Ireland; his wife, Bridget, age 54; and children: Mary, age 27; Bridget, age 17; and Peter, age 13; and a visitor, Bridget Chambers, age 40.

The children of Edward (Ned) and Matilda (Tillie) Kilroy were:

Mary Kilroy (September 19, 1875–1948) (the oldest), who married Michael (Mickey) McManamon (1875–1958) of Glenhest in about 1906 or 1907 (see below). Their children were Joseph (m. Molly McManamon), Matilda (m. Tom Doyle), Mary (m. Thomas Battle), and Margaret (m. Owen Mullins). Their second daughter, Mary, married Thomas Battle. Their third daughter, Margaret, who died in 1974, married Owen Mullins, who was a fixture at the Newport House for over forty years. We met him there, and found that he had visited Teel's mother, Nancy Kilroy Whelton, in Galveston, Texas. The 1901 census shows Mary Kilroy as age 24, not married, and living with her parents.When Teel's grandmother, Matilda Kilroy, died in August of 1908, Teel's mother, Anne (Nancy) Kilroy, was eight years old. Nancy was raised by Mary Kilroy McManamon, her oldest sister. Nancy grew up in the same household with a younger cousin, Mary McManamon, who became Mary Battle. When Nancy, Teel's mother, was in her last illness in Galveston, Texas, in 1986, Mary Battle came from Ballina Ireland to Galveston to take care of Nancy. Mary Battle, who was alive and well in Ballina in 2002, gave me much of the data that is on this page.

"Jim McHugh was a nephew to Michael McManamon. Michael was a Glenhest man and he was married to Mary Kilroy who was a daughter to Eddie and Tilly of Derrylahan." The Chambers Family History

Bridget Kilroy (July 4, 1877–), who married Pat McNeela of Ballycroy. Their children were May, Matilda (Tillie), Margaret (Maggie), Jack,* Bridie, Paddy, Michael (Mick), Eamon, Martin, and Joseph. (O'Grady does not list Martin.) The 1901 census shows Bridget as age 22, not married, and living with her parents. Margaret McNeela of Knockmoyle, county Mayo, is the author of Glorious Glenhest: Memories of a Community.

*Sean 'Jack' McNeela from Mayo (Ballycroy) died on hunger strike after 55 days in Mountjoy Jail on April 19, 1940. On the day before he died, "Seán McNeela’s uncle, Mick Kilroy, the Fianna Fáil TD, came to see him. He attacked Seán for 'daring to embarrass de Valera' the 'heaven-sent leader' by such action and demanded that McNeela give up his hunger strike at once. McNeela ordered him out of the room. ... The next day April 19 Seán McNeela, the IRA Volunteer from Ballycroy, County Mayo, died. ... An IRA order to end the hunger strike was sent to the prison on the day before by GHQ but word had not got in in time to save McNeela." " IrishRepublicanNet (April 16, 2011).

John Francis Kilroy (sometimes listed as Francis Kilroy) (May 14, 1879–1963) who married Margaret (Mag) Leonard (1893–1962) (sister of Nan Leonard who married John's brother Michael) of Crossmolina, Mayo. They were married in 1912 in Newport. Their children were Mary (born 1914, m. James O'Grady), Matilda (1915–1985, m. Ezra McManamon in London), Edward (born 1917, m. Ellen Philema Ketterick on September 25, 1949, in Westport, county Mayo), Michael (1920–1981, m. Vera Bradshaw in October, 1945, in England), Catherine (Cait, Kate, Catherine, m. Patrick Doherty), Sean (1921–1942), and Dominick (1929–1978, m. Monique Lisback in 1956 in Castlebar, then Grace, in Wembley, Middlesex, England). The 1901 census shows John as age 21, living with his parents, and not married. (The Kilroy Family website lists, in the fourth generation, John Kilroy who died about 1963 in county Mayo, Ireland, at about age 83.) Their oldest daughter, Mary Kilroy, was born in 1914 and married James O'Grady (1909–1955) in Newport on January 4, 1939. They moved to Chicago. Their oldest son, Donal O'Grady, who was born in 1940, now lives in Chicago and is the source of much of the information on the Kilroy family published on this page.

Mary, the daughter of John Kilroy and Margaret Leonard, married James O'Grady in Newport on January 4, 1939. They moved to Chicago. Their oldest son, Donal O'Grady, was born in 1940, and is mentioned elsewhere on this page as the guru of Kilroy genealogy. He has furnished me with invaluable material on the history of the Kilroys.

Peter Kilroy (May 16, 1882–September 13, 1941) married Kay (Catherine) Hoban in Cleveland, Ohio. Their five children were Matilda, Margaret, Charles, Virginia, and Edward. The 1901 census of Burrishoole parish lists Peter as age 18, living with his parents, and not married. (The Kilroy Family website lists, in the fourth generation, Peter Kilroy, who married Katherine Hoban, and died in Cleveland on September 13, 1941.) The Ellis Island website lists a Peter Kilroy, age 21, who arrived in New York from Queenstown on May 23, 1903, aboard the Campania; and Kate Hoban, age 20, who arrived in New York from Queenstown on May 13, 1906, aboard the Celtic. The manifest of the of the Campania lists Peter Kilroy's occupation as a farmer; he was single, could read and write; his nationality was Irish and his place of last residence was Newport; he had not been in the United States before; he was going to the home of his uncle, James Kilroy, at 569 Union Street, Cleveland+.

The manifest of the Celtic lists Kate Hoban's occupation as a dress-maker; she was single; she was going to the home of her sister, Mary Hoban, at 171 Pearl Street in Cleveland; she was travelling with a cousin, Mary O'Malley, also age 20, a servant, who had the same destination, the home of her cousin Mary Hoban in Cleveland at 171 Pearl Street.* The last place of residence of both Kate Hoban and Mary O'Malley, was Newport Ireland. The 1910 census of Cleveland (T-624, roll 1173, page 4B, line 58) lists Peter Kilroy, age 27, born in Ireland, single, who emigrated in 1903 and was naturalized, a carpenter (house), listed as a nephew in the home on Heath Avenue of his uncle, John Chambers.# There was a cousin of John Chambers in the same house: William Chambers, age 38, single, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1892, naturalized, a tinman in a rolling mill. John Chambers was listed as age 40 (probably should have been 42), born in Ireland, and had been married to his wife Margaret, age 40 (probably should be 42), born in Ohio (should be Ireland), for 15 years.^

*Traveling with Kate Hoban and Mary O'Malley, all from Newport and —all enroute to Cleveland— were: Annie McGlynn, age 25, a cook, enroute to 171 Pearl Street, Cleveland; Patrick McGlynn, age 19, a laborer, going to visit his sister at 171 Pearl Street; Nora O'Donnell, age 18, a servant, who was going to the home of her sister, Mrs. Cain, at 60 Alger Street, Cleveland (The 1900 census of Clevland lists at 60 Alger Street a Michael Kane, age 40, born in March, 1860, in Ireland, married 17 years; his wife, Katherine (McLoughlin) Kane, age 39, born in Ireland in May of 1861, and five children, all born in Ohio); Agnes McCann, age 19, a servant, who was going to the home of her sister Mrs. O'Malley at 188 Washington Street, Cleveland; Nora Chambers, age 23, a servant, going to the home of her sister, Mrs. Dickson at 77 Taylor Street, Cleveland; and John Dickson, age 4, a child whose fare was paid by his aunt (apparently Nora Chambers), and who was going to the home of her brother at 77 Taylor Street.

+Here is a listing of the family from the 1900 census of Cleveland (ward 26), Cuyahoga county, Ohio, at 569 Union Street:

(1900) James Kilroy, age 44, born in Ireland in 1856, married 19 years, emigrated to the United States in 1881, naturalized, a tin worker, could read and write, owner of a home free of a mortgage (roll T623_1257, page 3A).

Mary Kilroy, age 44, born in Ireland in March, 1856; married 19 years; mother of ten children, 10 living; emigrated to the United States in 1881; could read and write.

Katie Kilroy, age 18, born in Delaware in February, 1882,

Thomas F Kilroy, age 16, born in Ohio in December, 1883, at school.

John H Kilroy, age 15, born in Ohio in January, 1885, at school.

Edward Kilroy, age 13, born in Ohio in September, 1886, at school.

Mary E Kilroy, age 12, born in Ohio in January, 1888, at school.

Maggie Kilroy, age 10, born in Ohio in January, 1890, at school.

Joseph Kilroy, age 8, born in Ohio in September, 1891, at school.

Willie Kilroy. age 5, born in Ohio in September , 1894.

Ignatius Kilroy. age 2, born in Ohio in January, 1898.

Theresa G Kilroy, age 1 month, born in Ohio in May, 1900.

The 1910 census of Cleveland (roll 1173, page 15l) lists a James Kilroy at 8743 Union Avenue (indexed by Ancestry.com as Kelroy). He was 52 years old, born in Ireland, and had been married 29 years; he had emigrated in 1881 and had been naturalized; he was a house builder; with him was his wife, Mary Kilroy (Mary Chambers), age 51, born in Ireland, who had also immigrated in 1881, mother of 11 children, all of whom were living, and 9 of whom were listed as living at home. As mentioned above, James Kilroy, the uncle of Peter Kilroy, had married Mary Chambers.

Here is a listing of the family from the 1920 census of Cleveland (ward 16), Cuyahoga county, Ohio, at 9407 Ramona Boulevard:

(1920) James Kilroy, age 62, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1880, naturalized in 1890, a carpenter on buildings (T-625, roll 1368, page 12B, line 65).

Mary Kilroy, age 62, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1880, naturalized in 1890. [Mary Chambers]

John Kilroy, age 34, single, born in Ohio, a bailiff at the court house.

Edward A Kilroy, age 32, single, born in Ohio, a salesman for a construction company.

Joseph Kilroy, age 29, single, born in Ohio, a clerk for Multigraph Company.

Ignatius Kilroy, age 21, single, born in Ohio, a commercial salesman—house.

Mary Mildred Kilroy, age 19, single, born in Ohio, file clerk in a bank.

Madeline Kilroy, age 17, single, born in Ohio, no occupation.

Here is a listing of the family from the 1930 census of Cleveland in a home at 9407 Ramona Avenue owned by James Kilroy:

(1930) James Kilroy (head), age 74, widower, born in South Ireland, emigrated in 1881, naturalized, no occupation.

John H. Kilroy (son), age 45, single, born in Ohio, attorney working in the structural steel industry.

Charles R. Hubbard (son-in-law), age 43, married at age 29, born in Connecticut, an electrician in the construction industry.

Joseph R. Kilroy (son), age 38, single, born in Ohio, accountant for a multigraph company.

Margaret Hubbard (daughter), age 40, married at age 26, born in Ohio, no occupation.

Madeline travis (daughter), age 27, married at age 24, born in Ohio, no occupation.

[The manifest of the Lucania when it arrived in New York from Queenstown and Liverpool on September 22, 1906, listed these two Kilroys with a destination of 569 Union Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio: James Kilroy, age 45, married, a "Boss. Roller, born in Ireland, a non-immigrant alien, of the Irish race, with a last residence of USA Newport (?), who had spent 25 years in Cleveland, Ohio, and who had last been there in 1906; traveling with James Kilroy, age 11, single, a child, US born, with the same destination, whose fare had been paid by his father. On the same ship, but on a different page of the manifest, was Margaret Kilroy, age 19, single, whose last residence was Newport, Ireland, and whose destination was the home of her uncle, James Kilroy, at 669 Union Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio,. ]

[The manifest of the Campania that arrived in New York from Queenstown on September 10, 1910, listed John Kilroy, age 30, single, a carpenter, whose last residence was Newport, and whose father was John Kilroy of Bleachyard, Newport, county Mayo, Ireland, and whose destination was the home of his uncle, James Kilroy, at 8743 Union Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. John was born in Newport.]

[The manifest of the Celtic that arrived in New York on July 28, 1921, listed Julia Kilroy, age 25, single, a domestic, whose mother was Bridget Kilroy of Bleachyard, Newport, county Mayo, born in Bleachyard, on the way to visit her brother, John Kilroy, at 3592 East 149th Street, Cleveland, Ohio.]

#This is probably the John Chambers mentioned in Michael Kilroy's The Chambers Family History at page 6. "John Chambers, my uncle, went to America. He married one of the Kilroy’s of Carrickaneady. They were first cousins and had a family." Kilroy Genealogies list a John Chambers born in 1869 in Millrace, Furnace, the son of Tom Chambers (1833–1896, born in Glen na Bo) and Celia (ogie) McNulty. John's older sister was Mary Chambers (1857–1929), who married Jimmie Kilroy, the son of Michael Kilroy and Bridget Higgins, and died in Cleveland, Ohio on June 2, 1929. The Kilroy family tree says that John Chambers married Margaret Kilroy who was born in Carrickaneady in 1867 to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers, and that John and Margaret were married in Newport on April 3, 1895. (The place of marriage was probably Cleveland, Ohio. Margaret Kilroy Chambers emigrated to the United states in 1887 and John Chambers emigrated in 1891, according to the 1900 census of Cleveland, below.) Their two sons were named Thomas Chambers and John Francis Chambers. See: The Chambers Family Page. Another Chambers Family page says that the John Chambers who married Margaret kilroy was born in Newport, Ireland, on March 17, 1870.

^The 1900 census of Cleveland (roll 1257, page 142) lists John Chambers at #18 [listed next to #57] Wageman Street: age 32, born in Ireland in March of 1868, married 5 years, emigrated in 1891, 9 years in the United States, a doubler; with his wife, Maggie, age 32, born in Ireland in August of 1867, emigrated in 1887, 13 years in the United States, mother of 2 children, both living; and their 2 children: Thomas P. Chambers, age 4, born in Ohio in February [15], 1896; and John F. Chambers, age 1 month, born in May [13], 1900, in Ohio. [John Chambers is listed as a "helper" at 55 Wageman Street in the 1900 Cleveland City Directory. James Kilroy is listed as a doubler residing at 57 Wageman Street in the 1900 Cleveland City Directory.] Both these children are also listed in the 1910 census of Cleveland. John Chambers, age 50, born in Ireland is listed as a widower in the 1920 census of Cleveland, working as a lineman for an illuminating company.

The 1910 census of Cleveland (ward 18), Cuyahoga county, Ohio, lists Peter Kilroy, age 27, single, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1903, naturalized, a house carpenter, a nephew, in the home of John and Margaret Chambers, both age 40 and married 15 years. John Chambers was born in Ireland, emigrated in 1891, owner of his home at 9704 Heath Avenue subject to a mortgage, with no occupation listed. Margaret Chambers was born in Ohio (should be Ireland), to parents born in Ireland, and the mother of two children, both living. Their two sons living in the household, both born in Ohio, were Thomas P. Chambers, age 14, and John F. Chambers, age 9. Also living in the household was a cousin, William Chambers, age 38, born in Ireland, single, who had emigrated in 1892, was a naturalized citizen of the United States, and who was employed as a tinman in a rolling mill (roll T624_1173, page 4B).

Peter Kilroy registered for the World War I draft in Cleveland on Sepember 12, 1918. He listed his wife as Catherine Kilroy, their address as 794 (?) Lamdon Road, Cleveland; his age as 36; his birth date as May 16, 1882; his occupation as a self-employed house builder; his height as tall, his build as medium, his hair color as dark brown, and his eyes as blue. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918 on Ancestry.com.

The 1920 census of East Cleveland (ward 3), Cuyahoga county, Ohio, lists the family of Peter Kilroy at 14418 Scioto Avenue:

(1920) Peter Kilroy, age 37, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1904, naturalized in 1909, a carpenter (houses), owner of a home subject to a mortgage (T-625, roll 1374, page 6B (or 119), line 76).

Catherine A. Kilroy, age 32, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1906, naturalized in 1910 [Catherine Hoban].

Matildah (sic) M. Kilroy, age 8, born in Ohio. [In the 1930 census of Cleveland, Cuyahoga county, Ohio, Matilda M. Kilroy, age 18, single, born in Ohio to parents born in the Irish Free State, is listed as an "inmate" of the school of nursing at St. Vincent's Charity Hospital on Central Avenue at East 22nd. Her position is described as "pupil nurse—hospital" (roll 1768, page 2B, line 79).]

Margaret E. Kilroy, age 4 years, 1 month, born in Ohio.

Virginia H. Kilroy, age 1 year, 11 months, born in Ohio.

Michael Kilroy [General] (September 14, 1884–December, 23, 1962), married Nan (Anne) Leonard (sister of Mag Leonard who married Michael's brother John Kilroy) of Crossmolina. Their children were Paddy (Patrick, 1915–1991, m. Kathleen Mulchrone), Mary (or Marsey, born December 3, 1917, in Newport, m. George Reid), Ethna, Peadar (m. Anne Cox in 1959 in Newport), Joe (Michael Joseph, born 1925, moved to Chicago, m. Marie Spellman on May 28, 1926, in Chicago), Jim (Edward James), moved to Chicago, m. Kathleen Lyons), and Maeve. I did not find him in the 1901 census. (The Kilroy Family website lists, in the fourth generation, Michael Kilroy who married Nan Leonard and had seven children.) Michael died on December 23, 1962, and is buried at Burrishoole Abbey. Eamon de Valera, president of Ireland, attended the funeral of Michael Kilroy in Newport, county Mayo, on December 26, 1962. Here is the obituary from page 1 of The Mayo News of Saturday, December 29, 1962:

Maj. Gen. Michael Kilroy Dies

MAJ. GENERAL MICHAEL KILROY, who died yesterday (sic—he had died on the previous Sunday morning), aged 78, at his home in Newport, Co. Mayo, was O. C. of the 4th Western Division of the IRA during the War of Independence and was regarded as one of the finest stgrategists of his time.

He stood for the Dail elections in South Mayo in 1923 and was elected with Sinn Fein. But he did not take his seat in the Dail until 1927 when he entered with Fianna Fail the year after the formation of the party. He was a deputy until 1937.

During his public life he was chairman of Mayo Co. Council and until his death was a member of the Hospitals' Commission.

In 1923, he was interned in Kilmainham and while there took part in a 40-day hunger strike. The following year he was interned in the Curragh but escaped after four months.

His ability as a tactician was evident from his plans for engagements such as the Skirdagh, Carrowkennedy and Kilmeena ambushes against the Black and Tans in Co. Mayo.

His fighting column had a great reputation and under his command were such figures as the late Dr. J. A. Madden, who had also been a member of the Dail; Comdt. Sean Gibbons, a solicitor now in Dublin; Comdt. Eamon Moan, ex T-D; Comdt. Willie Malone; Comdt. Broddie Malone; Comdt. Tom Kitterick, Westport, the late Jim Rushe and the late Joe Ring.

Reputation

Even before the rising he had been training in I.R.A. camps, and had quickly built a reputation as an excellent soldier.

He was also noted during his political life as the proposer of Mr. de Valera, now the President, as president of the Executive Council in 1932.

He is survived by three daughter, Sister Margaret Joseph, Sisters of Charity, Choma, Northern Rhodesia; Dr. Maeve Kilroy, and Mrs. Margaret Reid; sons Patric, Peadar, who is Commandant of the F.C.A. in Westport, Joe, Jim and Dominick, all in the U.S.: brothers John, Newport, and Patrick, Australia and sisters, Mrs. Matilda McDonnell, Galway, and Mrs. Nancy Whelton, Texas. The remains were removed to the St. Patrick's Church and the funeral will take place to Burrishoole Cemetery on Wednesday (actually, the previous Wednesday, December 26).

Comdt. Eamon Moane who served under Maj. Gen. Kilroy during the War of Independence said he was a wonderful soldier, officer and comrade.

"He would have achieved the highest rank in any army with his outstanding ability. In later years when he became a public figure he did not lose any of the qualities he displayed in his earlier years. His sincerity is well known to all. He was one of the finest men of his generation."

Patrick "Pakie" Kilroy (December 27, 1886–) married Kate Igoe of Carnalow and went to Melbourne, Australia. Their children were Edward (m. Evelyn Cavalier), Matilda (m. George Sandilands), Teresa (m. Jeremy McCarthy), Kitty (m. William Igoe*), Virginia (Valma) (m. Noel Hughes), and Patricia (m. Art Sommers). Another source says he married Catherine Joyce on April 3, 1914, in Newport (Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40). The 1901 census shows Patrick, age 14, a scholar, living with his parents. Kate Igoe died in 1956. Australian Electoral Rolls, 1903–1954, on Ancestry.com, shows Patrick Kilroy, carpenter, and Catherine Kilroy, housewife, in the subdivision of Newport, division of Melbourne Ports, electoral division of Gellebrand, state of Victoria, Australia, in 1919 through 1954, Here is the listing for 1949: at 36 William Street, Patrick Kilroy, carpenter; Catherine Kilroy, home duties; Catherine Veronica (Kitty*) Kilroy, dressmaker; at 72 River Street, Edward Kilroy, turner; Evelyn Jane (Cavalier) Kilroy, home duties. Edward was with Patrick and Catherine at 36 William Street in 1943.

*In 1954, William Igoe, process worker, was living with Catherine Veronica Igo at 10 Milton Street, Footscray North, Maribyrnong, Victoria, Austalia, according to Australian Electoral Rolls, 1903–1954 on Ancestry.com.

Dominick Kilroy (February 5, 1890–1919), who died without marrying, in Derrylahan (Derryloughan More?), at about the age of 29 in 1919. The 1901 census shows Dominick, age 11, a scholar, living with his parents. (Family Search lists a Dominick Kilroy born to Edward Kilroy and Matilda or Tillie Kilroy in Derrylahan, county Mayo, in about 1890, who died on February 5, 1967, while residing on Quay Road, Newport, Ireland, and who is buried at Burrishoole, Mayo, Ireland. The record was submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. The obituary of Major General Michael Kilroy in 1962 says that his brother Dominick was in the United States.

Margaret Kilroy (baptized March 27, 1893–), who married Thomas McRory (McCrory, possibly McKenny?) of northeast Omagh, county Tyrone (see below). Their children were Mary, Philomena, and Margaret (who died in 1936). (Donal O'Grady lists only one child, Mary Rose McCrory, who became a nun.) The 1901 census shows Maggie Kilroy, age 8, a scholar, living with her parents.

Matilda Kilroy (baptized April 17, 1895–), who married Peter J. McDonnell of Leenane, county Galway. Their children were Maeve (m. Pat Kelly), Joe, Peadar, Maureen, Ethna (whom we visited in Galway), Peggy, and Patrick (m. King). (O'Grady does not list Maureen.) The 1901 census shows Matilda, age 6, a scholar, living with her parents. There was another son, Eamonn or Edward, who married Mary King of county Kerry. Here is part of an email of October 19, 2006, from Sean McDonnell of Ireland:

"Subect: my grandmother "Tilly" McDonnell nee Killroy

"Thank you for an interesting read on a lot of my family history that I had no idea of. That was my grandmother Tilly who married Peter J. McDonnell of Leenane.

"One of their children Eamonn (Edward) not listed was my father; born sixth of April 1927 to 2nd August 1986. Eamonn my dad married Mary nee King of Brosna, Co. Kerry on April 6th 1953 and they had 3 children, Sean 15/5/54 (me), Diarmuid 8/1/1959 and Una 20/9/1966.

"I have many happy memories of holidays spent in "Derrlahan" Newcastle, Galway with my grandparents and their friends who often called when in Galway from Leenane and Newport."

Anne (Nancy) Kilroy (baptized February 3, 1900–1986) (Teel's mother), who was born (baptized?) on February 3, 1900. Sponsors at her baptism in the Newport chapel were Thomas Chambers and Mary Chambers. She married Patrick Whelton on June 26, 1929, in Cleveland, Ohio. They made their home in Galveston, Texas. Their children were Edward, Maurice, Ellen, Matilda (Teel—my wife), and Patrick. The 1901 census shows Anne Kilroy, age 1, living with her parents. She died in Galveston, Texas on October 25, 1986 (see the section below under the heading: Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy).

Here are excerpts from The Chambers Family History, written by Michael Chambers in 1978, pages 19–22 (with some repetition of shorter excerpts set out earlier in this section):

"Long Jim Kilroy lived in the old home. The other brother John lived quite near. Jim and John were married to two sisters named Keane from Gortaworla, a village quite near.

"Their sister Tilly Kilroy was married to Eddie Kilroy and they lived in Derrylahan about a half a mile from Newport on the East side of the Mulranny road.

"Eddie Kilroy was born in Furnace and was a brother to Jimmy Kilroy who was married to Mary Chambers my aunt. ... (see the excerpt below from page 2)

"Michael Kilroy the TD was son to Eddie and Tilly of Derrylahan .

"Long Jim Kilroy had two sons and a daughter. His daughter [Margaret] was married to a Martin Harte of Glenhest. I know they had a family .

"Jim Kilroy junior was married to Annie Chambers from Glen Laure near Skirdagh. She died a young woman and left a family. Jim and Annie were no relations.

"Jim's other brother was named Martin. He worked in England and Dublin in his youth. I lost touch with Martin.

"John Kilroy [who married Honor Keane] had 2 sons and 2 daughters. One daughter [Margaret] married Jim McHugh who had a farm nearby. They had a family. Jim died about 3 years ago. Jim McHugh was a nephew to Michael McManamon. Michael was a Glenhest man and he was married to Mary Kilroy who was a daughter to Eddie and Tilly of Derrylahan. John Kilroy's second daughter married a man named Griffen from Gortaworla. Griffen's father was a stranger but he was married to a Keane girl from Gortawarla. [Gortawarla is a townland 3 kilometers south of Newport in Kilmeena parish. Kilmeena parish is immediately south of Burrishoole parish.] There were quite a few Keane families in Gortawarla 50 years ago. I don't think any of John Kilroy's sons got married, if they did they were old.

"Tillie and Eddie Kilroy of Derrylahan. Their family.

"Michael (TD) and John married two sisters named Leonard from near Lahardane* [in the Civil and Roman Catholic parish of Addergoole]. They both had large families. Dominick died young. Paddy went to America. [Australia?]. (Please see page 6 regards John Chambers and Mary Kilroy (first cousins) were married and lived in America.)

[*"Lahardane, alias Lahardaun (Leathardan), is a picturesque village situated west of Lough Conn under the shadow of Nephin. Archbishop John Mac Hale of Tuam (1791-1881) was born in the nearby townland of Tobernaveen. There is a monument in the village in memory of Fr. James Conroy, the parish priest of Addergoole, who was hanged in Castlebar for assisting the French in 1798." The civil parish of Addergoole contains the southern part of the western shore of Lough Conn, and is immediately north of the parish of Aglish, which contains the town of Castlebar, and the parish of Turlough, which contains Foxford. Fourteen men and women from the parish of Addergoole were aboard the Titanic when it sank in April of 1912. Only three survived. See the website of the Addergoole Titanic Society and my page Sinking of the Titanic—James and George McGough Man Lifeboats. On the Addergoole site is Jack Leonard's famous photograph The Men of the West taken at 11:45 pm on June 21, 1921 with the townland of Derrymartin as the backdrop. The man at the front and center of this photograph may be my wife's uncle, Michael Kilroy. (Photo 11/15 under Addergoole's Scenery.)

[Griffith's Valuation of the parish of Addergoole listed Catherine Leonard and Matthew Leonard in the townland of Cum, and Patrick Leonard in the townland of Dervin. I record this information because John McGough (sometimes McGoff) and Bridget Leonard were the parents of William McGoff who was born in county Mayo on April 10, 1870; and Mary McGough, who was born in county Mayo on April 21, 1877. See my page: McGoughs in County Mayo. Could this be another connection between the Kilroys and McGoughs? ]

"Bridget Kilroy, their sister, married Pat McNeela my uncle of Ballycroy. They had four daughters and 5 sons. Michael one of the sons is married in the old home and has a family. Bridget Kilroy (Mrs McNeela) was daughter to Eddie and Tilly of Derrylahan.

"Mary Kilroy married Michael McManamon . They had 3 daughters and one son Joe. Joe is married and has a family. He lives in Derrylahan now for about 40 years. Joe married Tom McManamon's daughter from Graffy near Skirdagh. There is Upper Skirdagh, Skirdagh and Lower Skirdagh.

"Maggie Kilroy of Derrylahan was married to Tom McRory. He was a stranger. They lived in Derrylahan for some time. They had one daughter and Maggie died shortly after Tom McRory left Derrylahan then. (and joined the Gardai in 1933. He was in the Irish Army and was responsible for the escape of Michael Kilroy from the Glass House Prison in the Curragh in 1922/23. He deserted from the army and came to Newport with Michael Kilroy and was on the run. He was a native of Belfast and was a member of the Truce IRA under Frank Aiken who was S.O.C.. He joined Michael Kilroy's column who were then at Sheeaun Lodge, Ballycroy, which was a training camp for the IRA).

Here is another excerpt from Michael Chambers' narrative, page 2:

"Mary Chambers (my aunt) married Jimmy Kilroy of Furnace and went to America about 100 years ago. They had 12 children and were well to do. Jimmy Kilroy was uncle to Michael Kilroy of Newport who was a TD. My Aunt Mary died in America over 50 years ago and Jimmy Kilroy lived to be a very old man ."

There is a partial genealogy chart of this Kilroy family on the Chez Nama website with more detail about later generations.

 

Ancestors of Edward "Ned" Kilroy

According to information furnished me by the guru of Kilroy genealogy, Donal O'Grady of Chicago, and the Kilroy Family website, Edward "Ned" Kilroy's parents were Michael (Mickey) Kilroy, who died in Ireland on March 16, 1892, and Bridget Higgins, who died in Ireland on July 29, 1889. (The website shows their dates of death as a day later than their gravestone.) Their gravestone, in the Burrishoole Abbey cemetery, about three kilometers west of Newport, reads as follows:

 

PRAY FOR THE SOUL

OF

BRIDGET KILROY

 

WHO DIED JULY 29TH 1889

AGED 71 YEARS

ALSO HER HUSBAND

 

MICHAEL KILROY

DIED MARCH 16TH 1892

AGED 86 YEARS

 

ERECTED BY THEIR SON JAMES

 

[A register of graves at Burrishoole Cemetery omits this grave and many others. See also Ancestry.com for photographs of the cemetery.]

Michael and Bridget Higgins Kilroy had these children:

3 i. John Kilroy married Bridget O'Boyle. Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40), lists the children of John Kilroy and Bridget O'Boyle of Skerdagh as: Patrick Kilroy, born on February 21, 1882; John Kilroy, born April 22, 1883; and Margaret Kilroy, born May 17, 1884*. In the 1901 census of the parish of Burrishoole, John (a farmer, age 67) and Bridget (age 44), and their eight children, ranging in age from 26 to 7, were living in Bleachyard, Newport East: Patrick, age 26; John, age 20; Bridget, age 18; Margaret, age 16; Peter, age 14; Michael, age 12; Julia, age 9; and James, age 7. A son, Martin Kilroy, was born on November 11, 1866, to John Kilroy and Bridget O'Boyle of Lettermaghra. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson)

*Margaret Kilroy, age 19, of Newport, arrived in New York on September 22, 1906, aboard the Lucania from Queenstown. to visit her uncle, James Kilroy, at 509 Union Avenue, Cleveland .

4 ii. Edward (Ned) Kilroy married Matilda (Tillie) Kilroy in 1873; died June 7, 1902 ? at age 60. [My wife's grandparents] The IGI lists the birth of Edward Kilroy to Michael Kilroy and Bridget Higgins in about 1842 in Derrylahan, county Mayo, Ireland.

5 iii. Patrick Kilroy, married and had five children: Dominick, Bridget "Agnes," Mary, Rose, and Michael.

6 iv. James Kilroy (October 10, 1856–January 22, 1944) (On April 10, 1881, married in Cleveland [more likely Ireland] Mary Chambers who lived March 17, 1857 to June 2, 1929). [James Kilroy is listed as a doubler residing at 57 Wageman Street in the 1900 Cleveland City Directory.]

Mary Chambers, born March 17, 1857 in Ireland, died June 2 1929, in Cleveland, Ohio. She married James Kilroy, son of Michael (Mickey) Kilroy & Bridget Higgins, on April 10, 1881, in Furnace, county Mayo, Ireland. James was born on October 10, 1856, in Furnace, county Mayo, Ireland, and died on January 22, 1944, in Stuart, Florida. They had eleven children.

Michael Chambers (born in Furnace on June 30, 1916), mentions James Kilroy in The Chambers Family History (on the link, click on "Download Journal written by Michael Chambers.") that he wrote in 1978, page 2:

"Mary Chambers (my aunt) married Jimmy Kilroy of Furnace and went to America about 100 years ago. They had 12 children and were well to do. Jimmy Kilroy was uncle to Michael Kilroy of Newport who was a TD. My Aunt Mary died in America over 50 years ago and Jimmy Kilroy lived to be a very old man ."

The 1900 census of Cleveland township, Cleveland, Ohio (26th Ward, Union Street), shows James Kilroy as the head of his family, born in 1856, age 44, married 19 years, native of Ireland, who emigrated to the US in 1881, naturalized, a tin worker, literate, who owned his home free and clear. Living with him was his wife, Mary, born in Ireland in March of 1856, age 44, mother of ten children, all of whom were living, who had also emigrated to the US in 1881. Living with them were their children: Katie, age 18, born in Delaware in February, 1882; Thomas F, 16, born in Ohio in 1853; John H, born in Ohio in January, 1885; Edward, 13, born in Ohio in September, 1886; Mary E., 12, born in Ohio in January, 1888; Maggie, 10, born in Ohio on January 10, 1890; Joseph, 8, born in Ohio in September, 1891; Willie, age 5, born in Ohio in September, 1894; Ignatius, 2, born in Ohio in January, 1898; and Theresa A., born in Ohio in May of 1900, and about one month old.

Here is information from Chez Nama—The Kilroy Family:

"6. James KILROY.
Born October 10, 1856 in Furnace, County Mayo, Ireland;
Died January 22, 1944 in Stuart, Florida.
Married Apr 10, 1881 in Furnace, County Mayo, Ireland, to
Mary CHAMBERS,
Born March 17, 1857 in Ireland;
Died June 2, 1929 in Cleveland, OH.

"They had the following children:
26. i. Kathryn Agnes KILROY
27. ii. Thomas Francis KILROY [who was born in Newport on December 2, 1883, became an accountant in Cleveland, Ohio, and died as a single man on October 20, 1939, in Jensen, Martin county, Florida, according to Family Search.]
28. iii. John Henry KILROY
29. iv. Edward Aloysius KILROY
30. v. Mary Ellen (Sr. Mary James) KILROY
31. vi. Margaret Ann KILROY
32. vii. James Joseph (JJ) KILROY
33. viii. William Patrick KILROY
34. ix. Ignatius Cornelius KILROY
35. x. Mildred Theresa KILROY
36. xi. Madeleine Cecilia KILROY"

7 v. Mary Kilroy (born about 1867, married John Cleary, in Cleveland, Ohio, and had three children)

Donal O'Grady says that the parents of Michael "Mikey" Kilroy were Edmond (Edward?) Kilroy and Bridget McManamon, who had eight children. The parents of Edmond Kilroy were Patrick Kilroy and Honoria McLoughlin, who had 3 children. Donal O'Grady estimates that Honoria was born in 1700, but the year her husband was born, 1730, seems to be a better guess. A family tree on Geni (managed by Kenneth Kilroy) reports a Patrick Kilroy who was born in 1730, and died in Newport, Ireland, in 1820, who married Honoria McLoughlin, who died on November 18, 1790. They had at least three sons, two sons named Edward Kilroy, and James Kilroy.

[There was another Kilroy-McLoughlin marriage in a later generation. Patrick Kilroy (son of Michael Kilroy and Bridget Higgins) and Bridget McLoughlin were married on February 21, 1887, and resided in Furnace. Their daughter Mary was born in Lettermaghara on January 30, 1888. A son, John Kilroy, was baptized on April 14, 1889; a son Michael Kilroy was baptized on August 29, 1890; a daughter, Bridget Kilroy on September 13, 1894; a son, Dominick Kilroy, on March 28, 1896; and a daughter, Rose Kilroy on November 25, 1897. Bridget died in Newport on November 18, 1970.]

A message of July 9, 2005, from Barbe Kilroy of Cleveland on RootsWeb's Kilroy Archives, lists these parts of her family:

PATRICK KILROY - Born c. 1730 Died c. 1818
He married Honoria McLOUGHLIN- Died Nov. 18, 1790
Children : EDWARD KILROY [Probably the Edmond Kilroy listed as a son on Donal O'Grady's pedigree charts.]
Patrick Kilroy,
James Kilroy
and 2 daughters?

EDWARD KILROY , Born? Died ?
He married Bridget McMANAMON , B ? D ?
Children: Mary Kilroy 1796-1806
Judith Kilroy, 1797 -
Honoria Kilroy, 1798 -
Sabina Kilroy, 1799-
Patrick Kilroy, 1802-
MICHAEL KILROY , 1806-1892
John Kilroy, 1808-
Dominic Kilroy , 1810-

MICHAEL KILROY. Born [1806] D Mar 17, 1892 in Ireland.
He married Bridgit HIGGINS. Died Jul 30, 1889 in Ireland.
Children: John KILROY
Edward (Ned) KILROY
Patrick KILROY
JAMES KILROY
Mary KILROY

[Grace's Family Tree on Ancestry.com omits listing Edward and Patrick and names only 3 children: John Kilroy; James Kilroy, born in 1856, who married Mary Chambers (1857–1929) on April 10, 1881, in Furnace, county Mayo; moved to Delware in 1881, and on to Cleveland, Ohio before the end of 1883, was a builder of houses in Cleveland, and died at age 88 in Martin, Florida, in 1944. (Mary Chambers Kilroy was the mother of 11 children and died at age 72 in Cleveland on June 2, 1929); and Mary Kilroy (1867– ?).]

Here is an inscription from a gravestone at Burrishoole Cemetery:

The Lord have mercy on the soul of Honora Kilroy alias McLaughlin Nov 18 1790 aged (blank) years Erected by her son James Kilroy.

In an email to Regina Kilroy, the daughter-in-law of Patrick Kilroy Sr. and Grace McGough, Donal O'Grady explains Teel's relationship with Patrick Kilroy Sr. of Chicago:

"Teel is a 2nd cousin of mine, or in other words my grandfather* and her grandmother [I believe this should be mother#] were brother and sister.

"Our connection with your hubby Patrick [Kilroy Jr.] is as follows ... Patrick's grand aunt Matilda Kilroy married Ned Kilroy, my great-grandfather (Kilroy married a Kilroy) which would make my mother and Patrick 2nd cousins. Teel and Patrick would be between 2nd and 3rd cousins, your children would be full 3rd cousins (of Teels)."

(The message was from: "Donal O'Grady" <Muigheo@compuserve.com> to "Patrick J. Kilroy Jr." <salveregina@juno.com>; dated 21 Jun 2000; subject: Kilroy Family Tree.)

*Donal's grandfather was John Kilroy (1879–1963) who, in 1912 in Newport, married Margaret (Mag) Leonard (sister of Nan Leonard who married John's brother Michael) of Crossmolina, Mayo. Their oldest daughter, Mary, was born in 1914. She married James O'Grady in Newport on January 4, 1939. They moved to Chicago. Their oldest son, Donal O'Grady, was born in 1940, and has become the guru of Kilroy genealogy.

#John Kilroy was the third child and first son of Edward and Matilda Kilroy. Teel's mother, Anne (Nancy) Kilroy (1900–1986) was the tenth and last child of Edward and Matilda Kilroy. Nancy Kilroy was the youngest sister of John Kilroy and 21 years younger than John.

In a later email of June 21, 2000, to us, Donal O'Grady elaborated:

"My Mom, Mary O'Grady, maiden name Kilroy, is a first cousin of Teels. She had been in Galveston a number of times to visit Aunt Nancy [Teel's mother], and also was at the funeral. I have a huge Kilroy family tree, with over 1000 names in it, including your family but not the grandchildren. I don't have dates in some cases. I also have a copy of the origin of the 'Kilroy was here' legend. I gave Teel's nephew, Michael, a copy of the tree sometime last year, and I spoke to her brother Patrick on the phone when he was visiting Joe Kilroy (Chicago) last year in Florida. ...

"Teel is a 2nd cousin of Regina's Father-In-Law ... Pat Kilroy [Sr.], who was married to Grace McGough, or your offsprings would be 3rd cousins of Regina' husband Pat. and also a 3rd cousin of mine. Or to really confuse you ... Teel's grandfather, Ned Kilroy was my great-grandfather."

 

Ancestors of Matilda "Tillie" Kilroy

Kilroy was the surname of my wife's grandmother, Matilda "Tilly" Kilroy, before she married Edward "Ned" Kilroy. Her husband was a Kilroy born at Carrickaneady. Matilda's mother was Margaret Chambers and her father was Michael Kilroy. Margaret Chambers Kilroy had these children:

# Jim Kilroy, born at Carrickaneady, known as Long Jim Kilroy, married a Keane. [James Kilroy was born to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers on September 14, 1864, in Newport. James Kilroy married Margaret Keane; see Carrickaneady under Other Kilroys in Mayo in the 1800s, below.]

[Family Search reports that Margaret Kilroy was born on August 5, 1865, in Newport to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers.]

# John Kilroy, married a Keane. [According to Famly Search, John Kilroy was born to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers on June 7, 1868, to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers, in Newport, Mayo. John Kilroy married Honor Keane; see Cuilmore under Other Kilroys in Mayo in the 1800s, below.

# Son 3 [Dominick Kilroy was born to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers on November 4, 1872, in Newport, according to Family Search.]

# Son 4

# Matilda "Tilly" Kilroy, married Edward "Ned" Kilroy.

# Ellen Kilroy, married an O'Malley. [Elenor Kilroy was born to Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers on June 9, 1870, according to Family Search.]

The father of Margaret Chambers (Kilroy) was Paddy Chambers, who was born in 1802 at Glen na Bo. Margaret Chambers was born to his second wife. Paddy Chambers' parents were Tom Chambers and Julia McManamon. See Descendants of Thomas Chambers born Glen na Bo, Newport , c1770 by Michael Chambers (born in Furnace, Newport, on June 30, 1916) and A further family tree of the descendants of Thomas Chambers and Julia McManamon.

Thomas Chambers held land in the townland of Shrafarna in Burrishoole parish, county Mayo, Ireland, in 1832, according to the 1832 Burrishoole Parish Tithe - County Mayo, Ireland. Several McManamons held property in the same townland. "Shrafarna" may be the townland know known as Srahmore. According to the same source, Francis McManamon held property in 1832 in the townland of Tavanagranne (Tawnagrania), about 3.5 miles north of Newport, with Kilroys (including Edward) and McManamons (Michael and Francis) as his neighbors.

Michael Chambers (born in Furnace on June 30, 1916), mentions James Kilroy on page 19 of The Chambers Family History (on the link, click on "Download Journal written by Michael Chambers"), which he wrote in 1978.

"Margaret Chambers was step sister [I would say half-sister] to my grand dad Tom. She was a Mrs Kilroy from Carrickaneady about one and a half miles the Castlebar side of Newport. She had 4 sons and 2 daughters. Two of her sons got killed on the railway in America .

"Long Jim Kilroy lived in the old home. The other brother John lived quite near. Jim and John were married to two sisters named Keane from Gortaworla, a village quite near. Their sister Tilly Kilroy was married to Eddie Kilroy and they lived in Derrylahan about a half a mile from Newport on the East side of the Mulranny road. Eddie Kilroy was born in Furnace and was a brother to Jimmy Kilroy who was married to Mary Chambers my aunt . Please see page 2."

 

Kilroys on the Flax Growers' List in Mayo in 1796

These two Mayo families were on the list of Irish Flax Growers, 1796:

Killroy, Widow, Ballyovey, Mayo

Kilroy, Hugh, Crossmolina, Mayo

On the list for county Galway was:

Kilroy, Michael, Ballymacward, Galway

 

Kilroys in 1832 Tithe Applotment Books of Burrishoole Parish

These names are compiled from 1832 Burrishoole Parish Tithe - County Mayo, Ireland on the Heaphy-Holly-Keane-Mulchrone Family Page 1795–1915.

Carrickaneady (about 1.1 miles southeast of Newport)

Daniel Kilroy

James Kilroy

John Kilroy

Inishkee (an island about 4.25 miles west of Newport:

Kilroy & Co

Knockatinweele (Knockatinnyweel) (1 mile east of Newport)

John Kilroy

Lettermaghera (about 4 miles northwest of Newport in the mountains)

Dominick Kilroy

Edward Kilroy

John Kilroy

Pat Kilroy

Tavanagranue (Tawnagrania) (about 3.5 miles north of Newport)

Edward Kilroy

James Kilroy

Patt Kilroy

Peter Kilroy

(also Francis Chambers and Francis and Michael McManamon)

Other Kilroys in Mayo in the 1800s

Ardagh (a short distance west of the town of Newport)

Edward Kilroy and Catherine Gaughan were the parents of these children baptised in the Newport Chapel on the dates shown: Patrick Kilroy, March 4, 1908; Catherine Kilroy, December 11, 1909; Thomas Kilroy, December 16, 1911.

Ballyteige

Patrick Kilroy, landholder, and Honor Philben, were the parents of: Honor Kilroy, born on July 29, 1865; Sarah Kilroy, born on September 29, 1867; and Ellen Kilroy, born on August 6, 1870. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, page 56)

Carrickaneady

James Kilroy [Long Jim Kilroy, whose mother was Margaret Chambers] married Margaret Keane, whose maiden name is also reported as Caine, Kain, and Kane in the baptismal records of Newport Chapel. Baptisms of their children shown by these records are: Mary Kilroy, March 11, 1900 (Kain); John Kilroy, April 14, 1901 (Keane); Margaret Kilroy, May 8, 1902 (Keane); Bridget Kilroy, May 2, 1904 (Keane); Patrick Kilroy, December 10, 1905 (Caine); Michael Kilroy, December 10, 1905 (Caine); Michael Kilroy, March 9, 1908 (Caine); and Martin Kilroy, May 9, 1910 (Kane). The records note that Patrick Kilroy married Anne (probably should be Grace) McGeough at the Chapel of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Chicago on May 27, 1947. Newport Chapel Records, Co. Mayo, Ireland—Baptismal Records, 1892–1911, by William G. Masterson, page 22 (Family History Library, British 941.73/82, K29mwg). Margaret Keane of Gortawala was the sister of Honor Keane who married James' brother, John. See Cuilmore, below.

Martin Kilroy, landholder of Carrickaneady, and Bridget Geraghty, were the parents of nine children: Patrick Kilroy, born February 15, 1868; Mary Kilroy, born March 25, 1869; James Kilroy, born March 11, 1871; John Kilroy, born November 16, 1872; Matilda Kilroy, born August 20, 1874; Martin Kilroy, born October 24, 1876; Thomas Kilroy, born November 28, 1878; Michael Kilroy, born July 22, 1880; and Dominick Kilroy, born July 22, 1880. County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, at page 55. Two additional children listed in Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40, are: Bridget Kilroy, born December 28, 1882; and Peter Kilroy, born on January 20, 1887. Another child is listed in Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1892–1911, by William G. Masterson, page 22: Laurence Kilroy, bon July 28, 1904; baptized July 30, 1904..

The 1901 census of Burrishoole parish lists in the townland of Carrickaneady: Martin Kilroy, age 60, farmer, Roman Catholic, born in Ireland; his wife, Bridget, age 54; and children: Mary, age 27; Bridget, age 17; and Peter, age 13; and a visitor, Bridget Chambers, age 40.

Michael Kilroy and Margaret Chambers are listed as the parents of these children in County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, page 55: James Kilroy, born September 16, 1864; Margaret Kilroy, born August 5, 1866; John Kilroy, born June 7, 1868; Eleanor Kilroy, born June 9, 1870; and Dominick Kilroy, born November 4, 1872. Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40, lists Dominick Kilroy, born November 3, 1872. Here is a quote from The Chambers Family History, written by Michael Chambers in 1978, page 19:

"Margaret Chambers was step sister to my grand dad Tom. She was a Mrs Kilroy from Carrickaneady about one and a half miles the Castlebar side of Newport. She had 4 sons and 2 daughters. Two of her sons got killed on the railway in America."

Patrick Kilroy, landholder, Carrickaneady, and Anne Cunningham, were married on February 26, 1865, and were the parents of these children: Patrick Kilroy, born January 7, 1866; Anthony Kilroy, born December 3, 1867; Martin Kilroy, born November 4, 1868; Mary Kilroy, born September 29, 1870; and Margaret Kilroy, born April 16, 1873. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, page 56). Patrick Kilroy, age 68, a farmer, is listed in Carrickaneady in the 1901 census of Burrishoole parish, with his wife, Anne, 55, and son, Patrick, age 32. Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40

Cuilmore

John Kilroy and Honor Keane were parents of these children whose baptisms are in the records of Newport Chapel: Michael Kilroy, October 5, 1910; Margaret Mary Kilroy, November 16, 1911 (who married James McHugh on November 24, 1943, at the residence of Joseph McManamon). Honor Keane (of Gortawala) was the sister of Margaret Keane who married John's brother, James [Long Jim] Kilroy. See Carrickaneady, above. Margaret Chambers was the mother of James [Long Jim] amd John Kilroy.

Derryloughan

John Kilroy, herdsman, laborer, and landholder, and Mary McTigue, were the parents of Patrick Kilroy, born on December 24, 1874; Mary Kilroy, born on May 17, 1876; Catherine Kilroy (sometimes listed as John), born on May 3, 1878; and John Kilroy, born on April 3, 1880. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson). Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40, lists the children this way: Patrick Kilroy, December 23, 1874; Mary Kilroy, May 15, 1876; Catherine (John) Kilroy, May 3, 1878; John Kilroy, March 27, 1880; Bridget Kilroy May 13, 1882; Margaret Kilroy, September 22, 1884 (married Eugene (Owen?) LaVelle on February 22, 1911, possibly in Cleveland); Peter Kilroy, born March 22, 1887 (married Mary Bridget Kettrick on December 30, 1916, in Newport); and Michael Kilroy; born May 11, 1889. Another son, James Kilroy, born at Bleachyard, was baptized ar Newport Chapel on June 3, 1894. Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1892–1911, by William G. Masterson, page 22.

Lettermaghera

Dominick Kilroy married Mary O'Boyle on June 22, 1883, and they had these children: Bridget Kilroy, born January 20, 1884; Mary Kilroy, born December 8, 1885; Sara Kilroy, born on February 4, 1889; and Catherine Kilroy, born on March 4, 1893 (1892?). Other baptisms listed in the records of Newport Chapel are: John Kilroy, August 24, 1893; Thomas Kilroy, December 9, 1895; and Dominick Kilroy, July 25, 1898 (married Bridget Masterson on August 29, 1920). This family is listed in the 1901 census of Burrishoole parish in Lettermaghera South: Dominick Kilroy, farmer, age 40; Mary Kilroy, age 42, wife; children: Bridget, age 15; Mary, age 13; Sarah, age 11; Catherine, age 9; John, age 7; Thomas, age 5; Dominick, age 2.

John Kilroy of Lettermaghera is listed in Griffith's Valuation. John Kilroy, landholder, and Bridget O'Boyle, of Lettermaghera, were the parents of Martin Kilroy, born on November 11, 1866. See Skerdagh below.

Michael Kilroy, landholder, of Lettermaghera, and Catherine Moran, were married on May 10, 1870, and were the parents of these children: Michael Kilroy, born on November 12, 1873 (baptized November 24, 1873); Thomas Kilroy, born on December 26, 1875? (baptized December 18, 1875); and Patrick Kilroy, born on August 12, 1878. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, page 56). Other children listed in Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 41, are: Peter Kilroy, baptized December ? 1880; Dominick Kilroy, baptized on September 28, 1882; Catherine Kilroy, baptized, October 15, 1884; Mary Kilroy, baptized October 26, 1887 (married James Walsh on December 12, 1911, in Newport); James Kilroy, baptized on January 5, 1890. This family is listed in the 1901 census of Burrishoole parish, Lettermaghera: Michael Kilroy, age 55, farmer; his wife, Catharine, age 50; and these children: Dominick, age 17; Mary, age 12; and James, age 10.

Michael Kilroy, age 40, a farmer, is listed in the 1901 census of Burrishoole parish in Lettermaghera South, with his sister Mary Kilroy, age 45; and sister, Cathrin Kilroy, age 37.

Patrick Kilroy and Bridget McLoughlin were married on February 21, 1887, and their daughter Mary was born in Lettermaghara on January 30, 1888. A son, John Kilroy, was baptized on April 14, 1889; a son Michael Kilroy on August 29, 1890; a daughter, Bridget Kilroy on September 13, 1894; a son, Dominick Kilroy, on March 28, 1896; and a daugher, Rose Kilroy on November 25, 1897. Patrick's wife, Bridget McLoughlin Kilroy, died in Newport on November 18, 1970. The family is listed in the 1901 census of Burrishoole parish in Furnace (or Srahmore): Pat Kilroy, age 60, farmer, Roman Catholic, born in Ireland; his wife, Bridget, age 38; children: Mary, age 13; Michael, age 10; Bridget, age 6; Dominick, age 5; and Rose, age 3. Their son John may have died before 1901. The daughter, Bridget Kilroy, moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1925, and her brother, Dominick Kilroy, followed her a year later. Bridget Kilroy, age 31, single, a domestic, who could read and write English, arrived in Boston from Cobb/Queenstown on September 5, 1925, aboard the Scythia. The manifest lists Bridget Kilroy's place of birth as Newport, and her nearest friend or relative in Ireland as her uncle, Edward Kilroy, Derrylahan, Newport, county Mayo (Edward "Ned" Kilroy, my wife's father). (Some Kilroy genealogies indicate that Bridget was also known as Agnes. Bridget Kilroy, who would have been 35 when the 1930 census was taken, may be listed in the 1930 census of Shaker Heights, Cuyahoga county, Ohio, as Agnes Kilroy, age 28, single, born in the Irish Free State, emigrated in 1926, a domestic servant in the home of Edwin J. Blandon at 16210 Parkland Road.) Dominick Kilroy, age 31, single, a carpenter, who could read and write English, whose last permanent residence was Newport, county Mayo, Ireland, whose destination was Cleveland, Ohio, and whose nearest friend in Ireland was his brother, Michael Kilroy, of Furnace, Newport, county Mayo, arrived in Boston aboard the Cedric from Cobh (Queenstown), Ireland, on April 11, 1926. The manifest says that Dominick intended to join his sister, Bridget Kilroy, at 2923 Brighton Road, Shaker (misspelled Shankey) Heights, Cleveland, Ohio, and that he intended to stay in the United States for ten years. Boston Passenger Lists, 1820–1943, on Ancestry.com. He almost certainly was the son of Patrick Kilroy (son of Michael Kilroy and Bridget Higgins, and brother of my wife's grandfather, Edward "Ned" Kilroy) and Bridget McLoughlin, who were married on February 21, 1887. A petition for naturalization was granted to Dominick Kilroy, age 31, by the U.S. District Court in Cleveland, Ohio, on September 18, 1931; his residence was at 9605 Heath Avenue, Cleveland (Petition 44465 on U.S. Naturalization Records Indexes, 1794–1995 on Ancestry.com).) He probably is the Dominick Kilroy who served as a witness to the marriage of my wife's parents, Anne Kilroy (Dominick's first cousin) and Patrick Whelton, in Cleveland on June 26, 1929.

Mullaun

John Kilroy of Mullaun is listed in Griffith's Valuation.

Maria Kilroy was born to Daniel Kilroy, a carpenter, and Mary McManamon, on November 18, 1864, in Mullaun. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson)

Newport

Ellen Kilroy of St. George's Street, Newport, is listed in Griffith's Valuation.

John Kilroy was born to Edward Kilroy, a laborer, and Mary Geraghty, of George's Street. Newport, on April 9, 1871. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson)

Thomas Kilroy, mason, Newport, and Bridget Kelly were parents of James Kilroy, born on May 16, 1864; and Mary Kilroy, born on May 16, 1864. (County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson, page 56). In the 1901 census of Burrishoole parish, Thomas Kilroy, age 78, a mason, was listed as living alone in Newport.

John Kilroy, age 22, a laborer of Newport, county Mayo, Ireland, was listed on the manifest of the Baltic when it arived in New York from Queenstown on November 10, 1905. His destination was the home of his sister, Mary McMahon, at 134 Woolsey Street, Cleveland, Ohio.

Skerdagh (Upper and Lower)

John Kilroy married Bridget O'Boyle. Newport Chapel, County Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records, 1872–1891, by William G. Masterson, page 40), lists the children of John Kilroy and Bridget O'Boyle of Skerdagh as: Patrick Kilroy, born on February 21, 1882; John Kilroy, born April 22, 1883; and Margaret Kilroy, born May 17, 1884. In the 1901 census of the parish of Burrishoole, John (a farmer, age 67) and Bridget (age 44), and their eight children, ranging in age from 26 to 7, were living in Bleachyard, Newport East: Patrick, age 26; John, age 20; Bridget, age 18; Margaret, age 16; Peter, age 14; Michael, age 12; Julia, age 9; and James, age 7. The family was in the same place in the 1911 census. A son, Martin Kilroy, was born on November 11, 1866, to John Kilroy and Bridget O'Boyle of Lettermaghra. County Mayo Families, Newport Area Families, 1864–1880 by William G. Masterson.

 

Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy

My wife's father, Patrick Whelton, was born on August 18, 1901, in Desert, county Cork, Ireland. His parents were John Whelton and Ellen Donovan. My wife's father, Patrick Whelton, was issued a British passport, with the endorsement "Travelling to United States of America," by the "Branch Passport Office, Liverpool" on February 9, 1921, and it was endorsed by the American Consulate at Cork (Queenstown) Ireland on February 15, 1921. Notations on the passport say "New York - March 4, 1921" and "Galveston - April 6, 1921." The Ellis Island website shows this Patrick Whelton arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the Cedric on February 24, 1921. He was a single male, a "Farm Labourer," age 19, who could read and write, British nationality, Irish race, from Clonakilty, county Cork, Ireland. In the box for "The name and complete address of nearest relative or friend in country whence alien came" was: "Mother, Mrs. Whelton, Dessert, Clonakilty, Co. Cork." His final destination was listed as Flushing - L.I. - New York. His mother's maiden name (not shown on the passport) was Ellen Donovan.

My wife's mother, Anne (Nancy) Kilroy, was issued a passport by the Irish Free State, Passport Branch of the Department of External Affairs, in Dublin, on February 12, 1927. Quota Immigration Visa No. 24507 was issued to her by the American Consul in Dublin on April 11, 1927. My wife's parents, Patrick Whelton and Anne Kilroy, met on the boat that brought Anne (Nancy) Kilroy to the United States for the first time in 1927. Patrick Whelton was returning from a visit to Ireland. Nancy went to a home in Cleveland of a relative, probably of her brother and sister-in-law, Peter Kilroy and Catherine (Kate) Hoban Kilroy. Patrick returned to his job in Galveston, Texas. They continued their friendship by correspondence, and they were married in St. Cecilia Catholic Church in Cleveland, Ohio, on June 26, 1929. Witnesses were Domenic Kilroy and Matilda Kilroy. (This Matilda Kilroy was probably the daughter of John Kilroy, Anne's (Nancy's) brother, and his wife, Catherine Hoban, with whom I believe Anne was living in Cleveland at the time of the wedding.) A record of the marriage of Nancy Kilroy and Patrick Whelton will be found at volume 157, page 171, page match 29, of the records of the Probate Court of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, which are on the Internet under Historical Marriage License Index, 1810 - April 1998. The newly married Wheltons settled in Patrick's then home town, Galveston, Texas, where they were listed in the 1930 census of Galveston in a rented house at 1119 25th Street (roll 2334, page 218):

Patrick Whelton (head), age 28, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1921, married at age 27, naturalized, fireman for railroad.

Annie Whelton (wife), age 30, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1927, married at age 29, no occcupation.

They had six children: Their children and many other Whelton relatives in Galveston are listed on my web page: Patrick Whelton and Anne (Nancy) Kilroy; Wheltons of County Cork and Galveston, Texas.

 

Matthew Kilroy and the Boston Massacre

Matthew Kilroy was one of nine British soldiers involved in the Boston Massacre of March 5, 1770, and who were indicted for murder on the following day. He was one of the soldiers who fired his musket, and one of two soldiers convicted of manslaughter (but acquitted of murder) and sentenced to have their thumbs branded. Kilroy was convicted of killing a rope maker named Samuel Gray. He was defended by John Adams. By law, the defendants were not allowed to take the witness stand in their own defense! See: The Boston Massacre Trials. See also: John Adams and the Boston Massacre Trials. (I do not know if Matthew Kilroy was related to the Kilroys mentioned above.)

The soldiers were members of the 29th Regiment of Foot, which, at least after 1800, was known as the Worcestershire Regiment. British Orderly Books show that the regiment arrived in Boston in (September) 1768 and returned to England in 1773. The 29th Regiment was the first unit of the Crown forces to shed the blood of the American Colonists, and was given the nickname The Blood Suckers or The Vein Openers. See: History of the Worcestershire Regiment (1694–1970). Enlistments were for life and at very low pay. See: Soldier of the King.

Here is an excerpt from The Summary of the Boston Massacre Trial by Stephen C. O'Neill (page 4) on the website of the Boston Massacre Historical Society:

"Kilroy and Montgomery faced the death penalty at the sentencing on December 14, 1770. To escape execution they 'prayed the benefit of clergy,' a Medieval remnant of the time when clergymen were excepted from the secular courts. To receive the benefit they had only to prove they could read Psalm 51, verse 1*, the 'neck verse,' at a time when most people were illiterate. Although illiterate himself, Kilroy was able to obtain the benefit because the reading requirement was abolished in 1705.

*Psalm 51:1 "Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving kindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions."

"Suffolk County Sheriff Stephen Greenleaf branded Kilroy and Montgomery on the right thumb with an 'M' for murder. The brand was to prevent them from ever being able to invoke the benefit of clergy again."

Kilroy returned to the Twenty-ninth Regiment, which had left Boston by ship following the Massacre—but the Regiment may not have returned to Great Britain until 1773. Most of the enlisted men in the 29th Regiment in 1770 seem to have been Irish, and the word Irish occasionally appears after the name of the regiment. Masonic Lodge #322 was formed within the Regiment, and is said to have been formed under an "Irish constitution." The regiment was in southern Ireland in 1750. Here is a part of a history of the 29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot:

"The 29th left Gibraltar in October, 1745, for Louisburg in Cape Breton where it remained until 1749, when it left for Chebuctoo Harbour, Nova Scotia and was employed in clearing the site of the present city of Halifax. They landed in Cork in 1750.

"In 1765 the 29th returned to Halifax, from Ireland, where it remained until 1768, then going to Boston."

Ann Rinaldi has written a novel about the friendship of Matthew Kilroy and Rachel Marsh who was a nanny to the children of John and Abigail Adams. The Fifth of March: A Story of the Boston Massacre (Gulliver Books Paperbacks, November 30, 1999). Here is part of a review from Publishers Weekly:

"Rachel is 14, bound as a nursemaid to the children of John and Abigail Adams, at whose house she sees many of the town's 'movers and shakers' (one of the book's few faults is its jarringly anachronistic language). When British troops are sent to Boston to keep order, Rachel—despite her increasingly anti-Royalist sentiments—takes pity on Matthew Kilroy, the young sentry posted at the Adamses' door. Their relationship gradually blossoms, but Rachel, who has embarked on an ambitious program to educate herself and who rightly fears 'getting into circumstances,' refuses to demonstrate her affection in more than verbal terms. Lonely, frustrated, underpaid and reviled by the citizenry he was sent to protect, Matthew explodes during a riot on March 5, 1770, after which he and his fellows are tried for murder and manslaughter in the deaths of five colonialists. How Rachel acts according to her newly awakened social conscience and sense of self-worth makes for engrossing and educational reading. However, readers may object to Rachel's sense of guilt over Matthew's sexual frustration, and to her pronouncements on 'good breeding.'"

[The Pre-Revolutionary Irish in Massachusetts, 1620–1775, by George Francis Donovan. (George Banta Publishing Company, Menasha, Wisconsin, 1932. 158 pages) lists a Matthew Kilroy in Boston in 1770. Donovan extracted only names of Irish origin—almost entirely from Whitmore's Port Arrivals ... Boston, 1715–1716 and 1762–1769 (indexed as source no. 9750 in PILI, 1st edition). Donovan's work was originally a doctoral dissertation at St. Louis University in 1931. Genealogy.com cites this work and gives a "permanent entry number" of 2760524 and "source publication code" of 1642. ]

 

Kilroys from Newport in Chicago

Here are the listing of Kilroys in Chicago Irish Families, 1875–1925 (now on Ancestry.com):

"Kilroy, Mary, nee Conway, April 25, 1899, wife of Michael, daughter of James Conway, sister of Patrick, James, Michael and Thomas Conway, native of Newport, Co. Mayo, aged 34 yrs. Funeral from resid., 652 N. Campbell to St. Mark's Church to Calvary"

"Kilroy, Nora, wife of Michael, and daughter of Ellen Cusick, and the late Matthew Cusick, and sister of Mrs. Frank O'Malley, Mrs. Michael Gill, Mrs. James Hannon and Kate, Delia, Peter and Margaret Cusick. Funeral from resid., 83 E. Huron st. to Holy Name Cathedral to Calvary, native of Co. Mayo. -June 2, 1902"

There is a Michael Kilroy, age 39, a laborer, from county Mayo, on the manifest of the "Atmosphere" that arrived in New York from Liverpool on March 20, 1865. With him was Mary Kilroy, age 8, and Catherine Kilroy, age 6, both from county Mayo.

The manifest (line 8) of the Caronia, which arrived in New York City from Queenstown, on August 30, 1905, listed Annie Kilroy, of Newport Ireland, age 46, married, a housekeeper, whose race was Irish and whose destination was Chicago to join her husband, Patrick Kilroy, at 1848 Superior Street., Chicago, Illinois. On the same page of the same manifest (line 11), and traveling on the same ticket, was James Kilroy, age 11, a single child, whose destination was also 1848 Superior Street in Chicago. Manifest entries indicate that both Annie and James had previously been in Chicago in 1905.

The list of US citzens on the manifest of the Panama when it arrived in New York City from Cristobal, C. Z, (Panama Canal Zone), on March 17, 1921, included: Daniel Kilroy, age 45, born January 6, 1876, in Chicago, and residing with his family at 2959 Fulton Street, Chicago; his wife, Ada Kilroy, age 38, born on December 2, 1882, in Washington, Springfield county, Kentucky; and their son, Daniel Kilroy, Jr., age 14, born April 15, 1906, in Chicago.

James Kilroy, age 48 (?), single, whose last residence was Newport, Ireland, and whose father was Martin Kilroy of Newport, county Mayo, Ireland, was listed on the manifest of the Caronia when it arrived in New York from Queenstown on May 31, 1911. His destination was the home of his brother, Michael Kilroy, at 2015 Seminary Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. His place of birth was Newport, Ireland.

John Kilroy, age 22, whose occupation was farming, whose last residence was Newport, Ireland, and whose father was James Kilroy of Newport, was on the maifest of the Baltic when it arrived in New York from Liverpool on March 13, 1923. John was going to join his Uncle, Michael Kilroy, at 1630 North Whipple Street, Chicago, Illinois. He was born in Newport, Ireland.

Margaret Kilory, age 18, single, a teacher, of Newport, who father was J. Kilroy of Carrickeneady, Newport, arrived in New York from Liverpool aboard the Carmania on April 8, 1921. With her was Catherine Keane, age 34, single, a tailor, also from Newport, whose closest relative was her brother, was O. Keane of Cuilmore, Newport. They both listed as their destination the home of their uncle, T. Kilroy, at 2436 Wilson Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. Each stated that they intended to remain in the US for 5 years.

Martin Kilroy, age 25, single, a policeman, who last residence was Newport, Ireland, is listed on the manifest of the Campania that arrived in New York from Queenstown on August 9, 1902. His destination was 3037 Broad Street, Chicago, Illinois (an aunt, Mrs. Vaughan). In the 1910 census, at 3037 Broad Street in Chicago, there was listed Anna Vaughan, age 62, a widow, mother of 5 children, 2 of whom were living, born in Ireland. emigrated in 1870 (T-624, roll 244, page 10A, line 20). In the same household were her son, James T. Vaughan, age 33, a widower, born in Illinois to parents born in Ireland, clerk for a railroad; her son, Richard J Vaughan, age 28, single, born in Illinois to parents born in Ireland, clerk for a railroad; her son, John H. Vaughan, age 25, single, born in Illinois to parents born in Ireland; a sister, Mary Garthy, age 62, single, born in Ireland, emigrated in 1870, no occupation; and a grand-child, Mary Anna (Vaughan?), age 6, born in Illinois to parents born in Illinois (probably the daughter of James T. Vaughan).

Michael Kilroy, age 25, a farmer, from Newport, Ireland, was on the manifest of the Carmania that arrived in New York from Queenstown on May 2, 1906, with a destination of 3037 Broad Street, Chicago, Illinois (an aunt, Mrs. Vaughan).

[Reverend Peter Kilroy, age 25, a clergyman of Newport, Ireland, arrived in New York from Queenstown aboard the Olympic on September 10, 1913, with a destination of Philadelphia. The manifest notes that he knew Archbishop Prendergast of Philadelphia. Peter's father was Martin Kilroy of Newport, county Mayo. The same Peter Kilroy, age 33, single, returned to New York on August 20, 1920, aboard the Celtic. His address was 3728 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Apparently, he had been naturalized in Philadelphia on March 4, 1919.]

 

Links

Descendants of Thomas Chambers & Julia McManamon of Newport, Crossmolina Parish Co. Mayo, Ireland, an oral history by Michael Chambers of Furnace, County Mayo in 1978. Michael Chambers was born in Furnace of June 30, 1916.

Kilroy Family

Chez Nama—The Kilroy Family

(Mac) Elroy, (Mac) Gilroy, Kilroy on GoIreland

Kilroy Genealogy Queries on CousinConnect.com

Kilroy Family Genealogy Forum on Genealogy.com

1832 Burrishoole Parish Tithe—County Mayo, Ireland

1901 Census for the parish of Burrishoole.

A superseded website, Search for My County Mayo Roots, by William G. Masterson, a member of the Chambers family, contains a list of valuable sources he has compiled:

"Anybody interested in the history of the parish of Burrishoole will find a mine of information in five publications by William G. Masterson. The publications are:

County Mayo, Ireland, Newport Area Families 1864–1880 by William G.Masterson, April 1994, 144 pages indexed, no permission required by General Register Office. Price $18. [Available at Family History Library, Salt Lake City: British 941.73/B2 V2mw 2000]

Newport Chapel, Co. Mayo, Ireland, Baptismal Records 1872-1891 by William G.Masterson May 1996 (revised January 2000), 128 pages, indexed, permission granted by the parish priest. Price $16 [Available at Family History Library, Salt Lake City: British 941.73/B2 K29mw]

[Newport Chapel, Co. Mayo , Ireland , Baptisms 1892–1911 by William G. Masterson September 2001 , 69 pages , indexed, permission granted by the parish priest . Price $15 . Added from Publications of William Masterson on an earlier version of the Newport Historical Society's Homepage. Available at Family History Library, Salt Lake City: British 941.73/B2 K29mw]

A Collection of Newport/Westport Co Mayo Marriages 1821–1911, by William G. Masterson, March 1999, 206 pages, indexed, permission to publish from Archbishop of Tuam. Price $23

Burrishoole Parish, Co Mayo, Ireland, Tithe applotment Book Transcription (1832) by William G. Masterson June 1992, approximately 60 pages, self indexed, with permission to publish from the National Archives, Dublin. Price $13

1901 Census, Burrishoole Parish, County Mayo, Ireland, by William G. Masterson Dec 1990, 171 pages, transcription and index, with permission to publish from the National Archives, Dublin. Price $20. [Available at Family History Library, Salt Lake City: British 941.73/B2 X2m]"

[1911 Census , Burrishoole Parish , County Mayo, Ireland , by William G. Masterson May 2002, 158 pages , transcription and index , with permission to publish from the National Archives , Dublin . Price $21. Added from Publications of William Masterson.]

The information is now largely contained in a fine website by Bernie McCafferty, Clew Bay to Cleveland, and CDs containing the information are available through him.

See the Kilroys in the index to the Chambers family page on the website of Burrishoole Roots - Newport Historical Society Genealogy.

Glorious Glenhest.

Burrishoole Civil Parish Townlands, Churches and Graveyards, County Mayo, Ireland on County Mayo Beginnings.

Chronology of Irish History 1919 - 1923.

Timeline of the Irish War of Independence


The Kilroy Connection
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